The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Physical Therapy Students

Mobility Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This mobility Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) is designed to use with a learner during an actual patient encounter. The leaner first views the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) videos on the Timed Up and Go Test, 30 Second Chair Stand and 4 Stage Balance tests and handouts prior to the administration of the Mini-CEX. The teacher observes the learner during the patient encounter and completes the Mini-CEX. The teacher reviews the form with the learner and provides feedback of what skill was observed, partially observed, not observed, not applicable and comments about the encounter.

Educational objectives: 

Learners who are administered this mobility Mini-CEX will:

1)acquire knowedgle about various tests for mobiilty, strength and balance.

2)be observed assessing mobility during a patient encounter.

3)receive feedback about their communcation and professionalism skills in assessing mobility.

Date posted: 
Mon, 01/23/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 01/23/2017
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Learner views videos prior to Mini-CEX
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Mobility Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/537

Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education - Interprofessional Team-Based Training, Assignments & Grading

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education (SAGE) program consists of an educational curriculum and community based outreach program aimed at increasing student opportunities for early exposure to older adults and issues of geriatrics. The program strives to create meaningful relationships for the interprofessional teams of students while gaining knowledge about today’s senior population and their needs. The educational component involves health care profession students interacting with each other and their senior mentor through structured assignments delivered in the home environment.

Student teams are paired in groups of 3-4 healthcare profession students. The student teams are then matched with a community-dwelling senior who receives services from Meals on Wheels or a senior volunteer from the local community. The program includes 6 visits over a 2 year period providing students an opportunity to apply their classroom education in the context and care of an older adult. Students practice and demonstrate basic clinical skills; including taking histories, interviewing, conducting examinations and cognitive assessments, and advising clients on nutrition, home safety, community resources and advance care planning.     

Educational objectives: 
  • Health professions students will develop competency with older adults;
  • Strengthen health care students clinical applications of medical education through an Interprofessional team experience in the SAGE Program;
  • Health professions students learn from each other and appreciate each others professions.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

SAGE Presentations

Marquez-Hall, S. (2015). Interprofessional practice: Seniors assisting in geriatric education. A round table presentation at the Interprofessional Practice Symposium, University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, TX.

Marquez-Hall, S. Lane, Y. (2014) seniors assisting in geriatric education (SAGE): Reynolds program address the lack of training in geriatrics and provides a model for interprofessional education. Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Education Annual Conference, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA.

SAGE Poster Presentations:

Marquez-Hall, S., Pitts-Lane, Y. Knebl, J., (2015). Seniors assisting in geriatric education (SAGE): Reynolds program addresses the lack of training in geriatrics and provides a model for interprofessional education. Poster presentation at Research Appreciation Day, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX.

Marquez-Hall, S., Lane, Y., Smith, R. (2014) Survey of medical students in a geriatric training program. Poster presentation at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Baltimore, MD.

SAGE Awards:

2013 Mae Cora Peterson Senior Spirit Award in recognition of the Seniors Assisting in Geriatrics Education (SAGE) Program, Senior Citizens of Tarrant County, Texas.

2011 AACOM Excellence in Communications Award. Second Place - Best Community Service Program-Serving Fewer Than 1,000. SAGE Program; University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine.  

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/13/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/13/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education - Interprofessional Team-Based Training, Assignments & Grading. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/537

Geriatric Interprofessional Teaching Clinic (GITC)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 
•Collaborative interprofessional practice and care are essential to the complex healthcare needs of a rapidly growing older adult population.
•Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) occurs when various health care practitioners, clients and/or caregivers work together to improve a client’s overall health.
•Teaching an IPC model continues to be a major gap in every health professionals’ education.
•To address this gap, the Geriatrics Interprofessional Teaching Clinic (GITC) at the University of Kansas Medical Center's Landon Center on Aging was created. It incorporates six professions: Students and faculty from  Physical Therapy, Medicine, Pharmacy, Social Welfare, Dietitics/Nutrition and Occupational Therapy.
•It is scheduled one half day a week with four patients scheduled on a "rolling" basis allowing for interprofessional teams of three to see patients in a staggered fashion. On average, each visit takes approximately 60-90 minutes.
•Logistically, students from 3 professions review the medical record together, discuss what they want to accomplish in the room, and how they will approach the patient encounter as a team. The students then see the patient and report back to the attending physician and other health professions faculty as a team. The assessment and plan for the patient is developed by the team.
•Team members are asked to define their roles by what the patient needs at that particular visit, starting with their own professional training and scope of practice, but then encouraged to allow themselves to participate in new ways. The interprofessional clinic faculty assist the learners by facilitating reflection on their clinical performance as individuals and as a team at the time of the clinic visit, incorporating their reflections into their next clinical encounter and through debriefing.
•To quantify interprofessional collaboration, evaluation tools are being piloted to assess for team dynamics, and surveys are sent out to each individual learner to assess for behavior and attitude changes. These are both done at the "beginning" and "end" of their GITC experience.
 
 
Educational objectives: 
•Create an interprofessional (IP) clinic involving multiple learners, emphasizing the national interprofessional competencies (values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, interprofessional communication and teams/teamwork).
•Train students in IP teams to evaluate their communication with the patient and with other team members following a patient encounter in GITC using a validated rubric. 
•Monitor changes in IP team behavior through individual learner evaluations.
Date posted: 
Mon, 10/10/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/10/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Interprofessional Teaching Clinic (GITC). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/537

Interprofessional Grand Rounds

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, together with the Rutgers University School of Nursing, and Rutgers School of Health Related Professions, piloted an interactive, team-based “Interprofessional Grand Rounds” as an instructional strategy to promote interprofessional care plan development and enhance understanding of roles and responsibilities across disciplines.  A total of 235 nursing, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, and medical students collaborated in small groups to problem-solve a complex, multi-faceted case presented with video elements to facilitate gait analysis.  Students answered case study questions using an innovative scratch-off ticket technique.  A team of interdisciplinary faculty facilitated the case-based group discussions. 

Educational objectives: 
  • Explain the importance of effective team communication in a healthcare setting
  • Stimulate team skills in respectful communication and cooperation by creating collaborative interprofessional groups
  • Report increased knowledge of other health care professions and individual confidence in taking an active role as a member of an interprofessional team
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Students were seated in small groups of 5 to 7 students representing different health care professions.  This design created a collaborative atmosphere and allowed open communication among the students from all professions.

  • Chairs in clusters (no tables)
  • Mixture of team members from each health care profession
  • Typical team composition: 3 to 5 Medical Students, 1 Nursing student, 1 to 2  Physical Therapy students, and 1 Respiratory Therapy student
Date posted: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Grand Rounds. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/537

A Developmental Approach to Campus-Wide Interprofessional Education: From Exposure to Immersion using a Geriatric Case Study

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This session will provide health professions students the opportunity to become immersed in a realistic interrprofessional (IP) care planning activity for an older adult.  The primary purpose of this session is to provide a health care specific experiential learning opportunity through which students may better understand the challenges of and develop skills for working with an interprofessional health care team.  The secondary purpose of the session is to provide an opportunity for students to better understand the roles of different health care professions early in their career.

Educational objectives: 

During this small group activity, student participants will:

1. Develop an interprofessional care plan by integrating their own discipline's plan with that of students from other professions.

2. Identify three types of professional competencies: (1) complementary individual professional competencies that are unique to a profession; (2) common clinical competencies that are held by more than one profession; and (3) interprofessional collaborative competencies such as team skills, communication skills, and an understanding of roles and responsibilities.

3. Use the SBAR tool to structure interprofessional communication and communicate essential information to team members about a patient.

4. Improve their orientation toward interprofessional team-based care as compared to multidisciplinary care.

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/18/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/18/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
A Developmental Approach to Campus-Wide Interprofessional Education: From Exposure to Immersion using a Geriatric Case Study. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/537
Subscribe to RSS - Physical Therapy Students