The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Video

A product that is primarily delivered in video format. Usually contains audio as well.

Alzheimer's Disease and Implications for Underserved Populations

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This one hour video lecture with accompanying PowerPoint slides provides an overview of Alzheimer's Disease in underserved populations. The target audience is Interdisciplinary Health Care Professionals.

Educational objectives: 

1) List populations that are at risk for delays in dementia diagnosis and treatment.

2) Identify strategies to optimize health services for underserved persons with Alzheimer's disease.

3) Identify key components of a comprehensive assessment of older adults geared towards maintaining function and independence in the community.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This material is from the Geriatrics and Gerontology Interest Groups (GGIG)

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/13/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/13/2014
Product Viewing Instructions: 
This video may take a few moments to load depending on your connection. Please wait if it does not appear right away.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Alzheimer's Disease and Implications for Underserved Populations. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Behavioral Approach to Agitation in Dementia

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This one hour video lecture with accompanying PowerPoint slides provides guidance for behavioral approaches for agitation in patients with dementia.  The target audience is Interdisciplinary Healthcare Professionals.  

Educational objectives: 

1) Define Dementia and discuss how it impacts communication and behavior

2) Define agitation and risks associated with pharmacological management of agitation in patients with dementia.

3) List non-pharmacological interventions for agitation.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This material is from the Geriatrics and Gerontology Interest Groups (GGIG)

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/13/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/13/2014
Product Viewing Instructions: 
This video may take a few moments to load depending on your connection. Please wait if it does not appear right away.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Behavioral Approach to Agitation in Dementia. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Hearing Loss in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

This PowerPoint video and audio discusses the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of hearing loss. Communicating with patients with hearing loss will be taught, all in less than 6 minutes.

Educational objectives: 

Understand the causes of hearing loss

Be able to better communicate with patients who have hearing loss

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/30/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 03/16/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Hearing Loss in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Interdisciplinary Team Care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Research suggests that good interdisciplinary team communication leads to improved patient and family outcomes (i.e., high levels of patient and family satisfaction, symptom control, and reductions in length of stay and hospital costs). The purpose of the interdisciplinary team is to foster regular, structured and expert communication among health professionals from different disciplines in order to establish, prioritize, and achieve patient treatment goals.

Interdisciplinary team communication is vital in an inpatient healthcare setting, as the complex nature and demands of the healthcare work environment requires the expertise and knowledge of differing disciplines or specialists who can work together to solve multifaceted and complex patient care problems. Interdisciplinary teamwork can improve the diagnostic and prognostic abilities of health professionals more than individual health professionals working alone.

The IDT conference focuses on:
1.    Establishing the patient’s progress toward medical goals;
2.    Considering possible resolutions of any problems that could impede the patient’s progress toward these goals;
3.    Reassessing the goals previously established, if needed; and
4.    Monitoring and revising the treatment plan, as needed

Educational objectives: 

At the end of this module, the student should be able to:
1.    Define the concept of interdisciplinary team care;
2.    Describe the professional role and scope of practice of individual members of an interdisciplinary health care team;
3.    Learn to structure an IDT Conference;
4.    Understand the goals of the IDT Conference;
5.    Identify ways to run an IDT Conference effectively; and
6.    Discuss common pitfalls of the IDT Conference

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/26/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/26/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interdisciplinary Team Care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Breaking Bad News using Role-Playing: A Multimedia Instructional Activity for Faculty/Facilitators Teaching Medical Trainees

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

A small-group instructional session on breaking bad news has been a component of the medical student curriculum in the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Longitudinal Theme in Geriatrics, Pain Management and Palliative Care for many years. The session used two complex clinical scenarios; each unfolding over 3-parts (see van Zuilen, et. al., at www.mededportal.org/publication/9604). For several years, faculty/facilitators expressed anxiety and uncertainty in their abilities to facilitate these complex scenarios using role-playing. In order to address faculty concerns the lead author developed a variety of shorter cases that progress through increasingly more difficult clinical scenarios. The author used these shorter clinical scenarios over several years and the sessions were rated equally well by students compared to the original cases. The faculty curriculum developers believed this new format lent itself to recording as a multimedia module: shorter cases more readily demonstrate the skills of delivering bad news. This recorded instructional activity was prepared and produced through a collaborative effort between faculty and students. We believe this recorded adaptation of the breaking bad news session provides a valuable learning opportunity and resource for faculty, especially those with limited experience in facilitating role-playing instructional activities. One drawback in using shorter cases is that students have a limited opportunity to practice the structured format (Buckman’s 6-step or SPIKES) for delivering bad news. Students may need to be given other opportunities in the curriculum to demonstrate their competency in using a structure format.

Educational objectives: 

Learning objectives for Faculty/Facilitators

After viewing and understanding the module and related materials, faculty/facilitators will be able to:

  1. use role-playing as an instructional activity
  2. implement or augment a role-playing instructional activity for breaking bad news within their curriculum

 

Learning objectives for Students

Using short scenarios, the student will:

  1. Appreciate the physician’s responsibilities regarding breaking bad news
  2. Understand the six-step protocol for breaking bad news
  3. Appreciate the impact receiving bad news can have on patients
  4. Develop communication skills for breaking bad news
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

To view the original educational material from which this material was adapted, see van Zuilen, et. al., at www.mededportal.org/publication/9604

Date posted: 
Fri, 01/24/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 01/24/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Breaking Bad News using Role-Playing: A Multimedia Instructional Activity for Faculty/Facilitators Teaching Medical Trainees. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Brief Cognitive Screening in Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module provides an overview of a variety of brief cognitive screening measures that exist in the public domain and can easily be integrated in care settings that serve older adults. The online module is designed to be an interactive didactic experience, which includes short videos, reflection questions, and experiential exercises.

Although this module is best implemented as a group activity with partners (particularly Section 3, which includes role play as both clinician and patient), it can be adapted and completed individually as well.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the purpose of evidence based brief cognitive screening instruments
  2. Review pros and cons of five brief screens
  3. Practice administration and scoring of brief cognitive screens.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The entire course for Brief Cognitive Screening for Older Adults is hosted on the Oklahoma Geriatric Education Center (Ok-GEC) website through the Donald W. Reynolds Dept of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC). http://www.ouhsc.edu/okgec/documents/Sorocco_Online_Courses/BriefCognitiveScreenCourse.pdf and consists of three sections:

  1. Intro to Brief Cognitive Screens for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar and two open-ended reflection questions (Survey Monkey link).
  2. Selecting a Brief Cognitive Screen for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar, links to download and review 5 brief cognitive screening tools, and reflective question (Survey Monkey link).
  3. Experience Using a Brief Cognitive Screen for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar, an experiential exercise of provider/patient role play (you will need to find a partner for this exercise) with instrument of choice (from the links provided in Section 2) to practice administration and scoring, reflective question, and final learner and course assessments (Survey Monkey link).
Date posted: 
Tue, 09/23/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 05/01/2015
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Please view course at: http://www.ouhsc.edu/okgec/documents/Sorocco_Online_Courses/BriefCognitiveScreenCourse.pdf
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Brief Cognitive Screening in Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

AEGIS - Surgical Informed Consent of the Geriatric Patient: First Do No Harm

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Informed Consent is an essential surgical skill that has moral, ethical and practical implications for the older patient. This module uses three video trigger tapes that present the “Typical” surgical informed consent, its potential aftermath, and follows with an example of an “Effective” informed consent. This module is part of the Advanced Education in Geriatrics for Surgeons (AEGIS) project.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion, learners should be able to

1. Describe the informed consent process including components

2. Discuss unique concerns for the geriatric surgical patient during consent

Date posted: 
Wed, 12/04/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 12/04/2013
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Videos are located on the PHUSC Geriatrics Channel on Youtube
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , , and . AEGIS - Surgical Informed Consent of the Geriatric Patient: First Do No Harm. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Shared Decision Making

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This educational video module is on shared decision making with older adults. By the end of this module you should be able to work effectively as a member or leader of a health care team that practices shared decision making with older patients and families. You will learn to incorporate their cultural background, health literacy, desired level of participation, preferences, and goals of care.

The module focuses on the special issues in engaging in shared decision making with older patients, including those with cognitive impairment.  Concrete behaviors are discussed that can be engaged in to help shared decision making happen.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion, learners will be able to:

  • Define patient-centered care & shared decision making, and know what a shared care plan is.
  • Describe the sorts of verbal and nonverbal behaviors that contribute to effective patient-centered care.
  • Incorporate patients' cultural background, health literacy, desired level of participation, preferences and goals of care.
  • Discuss the benefits to health care providers and patients who engage in this style of communication.

.

Date posted: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Product Viewing Instructions: 
QuickTime Player is required for viewing
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . Shared Decision Making. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

It's My Old Back, Again: An Approach to Diagnosing and Managing Back Pain in the Older Adult.

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Assessing and treating pain in older adults is of critical importance for nearly all health care providers. Back pain is a common, costly, disabling, yet under-addressed condition in this population. Specifically, musculoskeletal conditions, such as back pain - the focus of this educational module - are the leading causes of pain as adults age. This self-directed, web-based, interactive educational module addresses the evaluation and management of back pain in older adults. The audience for this module is anyone who provides care (both out-patient and in-patient) for older adults with back pain.

Educational objectives: 

1) Summarize the prevalence and impact of back pain in older persons.

2) Describe how to clinically evaluate back pain including a detailed examination.

3) List the differential diagnosis of back pain in older persons.

4) Explain how to manage the most common etiologies of back pain in older adults.

4) Summarize the risks, benefits and guidelines for specific pharmacologic management of back pain in older adults and how to minimize and monitor for adverse effects.

5) Summarize the various non-pharmacological approaches to managing back pain.

6) Describe which situations are appropriate for referral to more specialized care.

Date posted: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . It's My Old Back, Again: An Approach to Diagnosing and Managing Back Pain in the Older Adult. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Urinary Incontinence and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Urinary Incontinence and Aging "ACOVE" is number 15 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  • Understand the characteristics of primary types of incontinence
  • Demonstrate an initial workup/management of incontinence
  • Understand the importance of removing foley catheters
  • Define valid indications for inpatient foley catheters
Date posted: 
Wed, 07/16/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 07/16/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Urinary Incontinence and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/44

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