The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Case-Based Instruction/Learning

An in-depth example of a clinical scenario, real or generated, which can be used to illustrate concrete concepts about one or more topics. Typically used as a basis for discussion or as a learner exercise. Can be a problem-based learning exerciase (PBL).

Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Introduction: Frailty is a diagnosable and treatable medical condition. It is a common syndrome in older adults, characterized by: physiological decline, marked vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, increased healthcare utilization, disability, high risk of falls, multiple comorbidities, and mortality. Our goal was to create a case-based educational resource in frailty for medical and other healthcare students.

Methods: A multidisciplinary team at the Miami VAHS, Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, designed and implemented an 8-module educational resource on frailty: An Introduction and 7 cases covering screening, diagnosis, management, and comorbidities. This curriculum was used and evaluated by 4th-year medical students from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Evaluation included a pre-/post-test and a curriculum evaluation with questions on content, learning objectives, value of the learning, and multimedia module usability. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used with unilateral Monte Carlo significance to compare pre-/post-test performance, significant at p<.05.

Results: Fifty-one students completed 4 modules and the pre-/post-test from November 2020 to March 2021. Students’ post-test performance demonstrated significant improvement (p<.05) in knowledge of frailty. Fifty-five percent agreed the multimedia educational activity enhanced their knowledge of frailty and will include frailty assessment in their future practices. The combined “Good + Excellent” rating from evaluations of content linked to learning objectives ranged from 82.3-94.2%. Overall, written comments were positive regarding multimedia usability.

Conclusion: These case-based modules on frailty were highly rated and positively critiqued by students. Pre-/post-test evaluations demonstrated an increase in knowledge of frailty.

Keywords

Frailty, sarcopenia, comorbidities, multimedia, case-based learning

Educational objectives: 

There are twelve (12) learning objectives for the seven (7) cases; two learning objectives repeat for multiple cases. The number(s) in parentheses at the end of each learning objective below designates the cases in which the learning objective applies. All learning objectives start with the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe.”

  1. Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools (1)
  2. Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions (1)
  3. Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional (2 through 7)
  4. Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination (2)
  5. As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team (2, 3, 6, 7)
  6. Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains (3)
  7. Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care (4)
  8. Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases (5)
  9. Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions (5)
  10. Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function (6)
  11. The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis (7)
  12. The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer (7)
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

 

Facilitator’s Guide

Understanding Frailty: Screening, Diagnosis and Management

Authors

Lubna A. Nasr, MD

Department of Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Bruce W. Carter Miami VAMC, Miami, FL, USA

Raquel Aparicio-Ugarriza, PhD

ImFINE Research Group. Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science-INEF

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Douglas Salguero, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA.

Michael J. Mintzer, MD, AGSF

Director and Associate Director for Education & Evaluation

Miami Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Miami, FL, USA

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank:

Rose van Zuilen, PhD, and Corinne B. Ferrari for their help in reviewing the modules and including this frailty training as a component of the MS4 geriatrics clerkship

 

Overview

Frailty is a term widely used in clinical medicine but often ill-defined. The primary purpose of these modules is to teach learners the definition, screening modalities and diagnostic methods for frailty. In addition, the secondary purpose to is display healthcare issues of older adults commonly associated with frailty. These include comorbid conditions, social disruptions, end-of-life care, etc.

This training is composed of eight PowerPoint narrated and animated presentations. PowerPoint was chosen because of its ubiquitous availability to virtually all learners. The introduction presents the basics of frailty definition, screening and diagnosis. The subsequent seven case-based modules ask students to apply their knowledge. We recommend that learners complete a minimum of four modules starting with the introduction and ending with Case 7; learners are free to choose two modules from cases 1 through 6 and are welcome to complete all these optional cases. Finally, case 7 is the most complicated and longest module; if a learner uses the fully narrated and animated features, it will run approximately 25-minutes. To meet individual needs, learners have the option to disable audio (narration and dialog) on some or all of the screens. (These PowerPoint-based modules do not provide the option of varying the speed of audio tracks as in some programs). Most students can complete the minimum of 4 modules in 60-75 minutes; all the modules can be completed in 2-2.5 hours. The list of module titles is included in Learning Objectives below.

All cases use a standardized template. Navigation instructions are included in the Introduction; all cases follow the same instructions. Learners must start with the Introduction followed by cases in numerical sequence; cases become more complex with progression. In evaluating this curriculum, we used: Introduction, followed by Case 1, Case 5 and Case 7. Students can return to the Introduction module at anytime to review terms and definitions.

Materials and Supplies

Access to a computer with Microsoft PowerPoint or other compatible software is required. Headphones or earbuds may be needed if learning is occurring in a congregate environment or because of learner preference. This training requires no other special instructions, materials or supplies. The PowerPoint presentations can be easily uploaded to the school’s learning management system for assignment to learners.

Learning Objectives

Learning objectives are included in each case. These objectives also act as a “preview” for the content within the animated and interactive modules. The introduction has no learning objectives because it is a “definition of terms” module for frailty, sarcopenia, and frailty screening, diagnosis and management. These topics are specifically addressed within the learning objectives of the cases. There are 12 unique learning objectives. Some of the learning objectives appear in more than one case. This is intentional. It allows learners to apply their learning to a new clinical circumstance or a new domain of care. The learning objectives follow the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe:” and are listed here by case:

Case 1: Mild Frailty

  • Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools
  • Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise, nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions

Case 2: Moderate Frailty and Falling

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 3: Frailty and Cognitive Symptoms

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 4: Severe Frailty, Dependency and Palliative Care

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care

Case 5: Frailty and Depression

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases
  • Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions

Case 6: Frailty and Major Neurocognitive Disorder

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 7: Frailty and Cancer

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis
  • The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Evaluation

During this curriculum evaluation, we used identical pre- and post-tests, containing seven questions with twenty correct answers, to measure learning. This pre-/post-test is available upon request. All questions were effective in discriminating an increase in learning. Learner comments on content, presentation and usability of the modules were overwhelmingly positive.

Use of These Modules

These modules are free for use for all teachers, instructors and trainers. They can be used as produced and be incorporated into an existing curriculum, in part or in full. When these frailty modules are used or included in another curriculum, questions from the pre-/post-test may be adapted for assessments of students’ learning. As with all student assessments, these questions would likely require revision after several years of use. If adapted versions of this curriculum, or parts of this curriculum, are published, attribution to original authors must be included and these new materials must be equally accessible to teachers, instructors and trainers as are the original materials. These materials may not be used or adapted for commercial purposes. (See Creative Commons criteria: CC BY-NC-SA [Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike]).

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/11/2021
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 06/09/2021
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2021 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Medical Student Synthesis Block - Hazards of Hospitalization

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

As part of the new curriculum at the University of Nebraska Medical School, geriatrics was utilized as “synthesis block”.  This allowed the presentation of geriatric material with the emphasis of review of material previously learned in the core curriculum in preparation for boards.  The cases were developed with this emphasis on review with the design to teach the information through a geriatric lens.  We addressed several of the major geriatric syndromes while reviewing board-pertinent information through discussion of cases.  The cases that follow were presented in the section of the course focused on the hazards associated with hospitalization.

Educational objectives: 

1. Identify potential hazards of hospitalization for all older adult patients.
2. Identify potential prevention strategies for potential hazards of hospitalization in older adults.
 

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 06/26/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Medical Student Synthesis Block - Hazards of Hospitalization. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Palliative Care of a Patient with End-Stage Liver Disease: An Unfolding Case Study

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This case study was developed for use in academic coursework and as a standalone training for health care providers (MDs, ARNP, Pharmacists, Social Workers, Nurses). This unfolding case study about the management of an adult in the midst of a health crisis. This case is a composite of many actual cases seen in clinical practice. During the course of this case study, learners are presented with information as the providers learn of the patient’s emergent and ongoing health concerns – from his Emergency Department admission through the development of his palliative care plan. Learners are asked to make decisions and use their best judgment about how to care for this patient and family.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of this case study, the learner will be better able to:

  1. Understand the natural history and disease management of end stage liver disease (ESLD).
  2. Use evidence-based practice to collaboratively develop and refine goals of care for patients with chronic, progressive conditions.
  3. Work interprofessionally to ensure the best quality of care for the patient and family.
Date posted: 
Fri, 09/14/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/15/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Palliative Care of a Patient with End-Stage Liver Disease: An Unfolding Case Study. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

ACUTE MANAGEMENT OF OLDER ADULT FOUND DOWN WITH ALTERED MENTAL STATUS

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This case study was developed for use in academic coursework and as a standalone training for health care providers (MDs, ARNP, Pharmacists, Social Workers, Nurses). This unfolding case study about the management of an older adult in the midst of a health crisis. This case is a composite of many actual cases seen in Emergency Departments. During the course of this case study, learners are presented with information as the providers learn of the patient’s emergent and ongoing health concerns – from her Emergency Department admission through her Intensive Care Unit stay. Learners are asked to make decisions and use their best judgment about how to care for this patient.

Educational objectives: 

 

  • Apply knowledge of evidence-based care provision to an older adult found with altered mental status after a ground level fall
  • Describe the contributions of the interprofessional team to care management
  • Demonstrate effective communication during handoffs in care
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Citations are listed at the bottom of the screen throughout the case study.

Date posted: 
Fri, 07/27/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 05/22/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
ACUTE MANAGEMENT OF OLDER ADULT FOUND DOWN WITH ALTERED MENTAL STATUS. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Iron Deficiency Anemia Across the Lifespan

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The Iron Deficiency Anemia across the Lifespan module was created for first-year medical students in the Cellular Function in Medical Genetics Course. The purpose of the module is to teach first-year medical students the basic biochemistry of anemia, the metabolism of iron and common clinical presentations of anemia.

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency; therefore it is likely that most students will care for patients with IDA sometime during their career. While Anemia is one of the most frequent problems encountered in Primary Care, its diagnosis could be easily overlooked, as the clinical presentation is not usually classic/traditional. For example: tiredness, and lack of energy, may be mistakenly attributed to aging instead of that to anemia. Therefore we thought that an important competency that students need to demonstrate early during training is the ability to recognize clinical presentations of iron deficiency anemia in different age groups. Early exposure and thorough understanding of IDA presentation across the lifespan is important to preparing learners to recognize and treat IDA effectively.

This module incorporates interactive case studies related to the profile of three at risk populations. The case studies are provided at the end of the module for learners to apply principles to virtual patient cases. The module is designed to enhance learning by comparing and contrasting between IDA signs, symptoms and treatment throughout the lifespan. The clinical symptoms and presentations of the cases are adequate for first-semester medical students. Students were given an hour to complete the module, which should be sufficient for students in their first year.

Educational objectives: 
  • Identify common conditions that might predispose a patient to iron deficiency anemia (IDA).
  • Interpret the signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that are associated with IDA.
  • Evaluate three case studies resembling groups that are at high risk for IDA.
Date posted: 
Wed, 05/16/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 04/02/2018
Product Viewing Instructions: 
We recommend using Google Chrome. Users will need to ensure that flash is enabled on their browser.
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Suggested Citation:
Iron Deficiency Anemia Across the Lifespan. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Interprofessional Didactic on Medication Reconciliation for Medical and Pharmacy Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Introduction
Medical schools are now required to include interprofessional training in which students collaborate with other healthcare professionals. This interprofessional didactic session was created by a pharmacist and physicians to teach a group of medical and pharmacy students about medication reconciliation.
Methods
A physician and pharmacist collaborated to deliver this 50-minute PowerPoint didactic during second-year medical students’ clinical skills course. Participating students included second-year medical students at the author’s institution, plus all pharmacy students rotating at the institution on the day of the didactic, since the author’s institution does not have its own pharmacy school. The didactic consists of lecturing, interprofessional small group work on cases, and large group discussion. Students were surveyed after the didactic to assess their attitudes about the session.
Results
A total of 63 students (54 medical and 9 pharmacy students) attended this didactic. Survey response rate was 58/63 (92%). On a 5-point Likert scale (1=Strongly Disagree, 5=Strongly Agree), students generally agreed that the lecture was valuable (mean +/- SD 4.7 +/- 0.5), provided new information (4.4 +/- 0.7), and should be continued for future students (4.7 +/- 0.5). Students also agreed that their school should have more interprofessional didactics (4.6 +/- 0.6).
Discussion
This 50-minute interprofessional didactic for medical and pharmacy students was highly valued by students, and provides a valuable setting for interprofessional education. This interprofessional didactic can be replicated at other institutions, including medical schools that do not have an on-site pharmacy school.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of this activity, learners will be able to:
1. Appreciate the difficulties many patients have with taking medications appropriately.
2. Describe how to approach patients in a collaborative, nonthreatening manner about their medications.
3. Identify how to appropriately obtain and document a patient’s complete medication list.
4. Appreciate the importance of maintaining an accurate medication list during times of transitions of care.
5. Appreciate the value of interprofessional learning.

Date posted: 
Thu, 02/15/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 02/15/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Didactic on Medication Reconciliation for Medical and Pharmacy Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The VA Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education began educational activities in Academic Year 2011-2012 to improve primary care education, particularly to harmonize the education of clinician trainees with the emerging and future practice of primary care exemplified by patient centered care such as VA’s Patient Aligned Care Team model for primary care delivery. This volume shares examples of educational strategies that have
emerged from the first four academic years of the project, with each chapter being a case study from a participating site. Each case study reports on the implementation of a curricular element within their unique Center of Excellence. These case studies are intended to be of use to those interested in introducing curricular activities in accredited programs for health profession trainees that will lead to
the advancement of interprofessional, Veteran/patient-centered primary care. These case studies also represent one component of the project’s evaluation plan, designed by Annette Gardner, Ph.D. We have attempted to inform readers about the context of the institutions and readiness for change, the steps each program completed to design and develop strategies, gain leadership commitments,
implement, and evaluate these interventions in the spirit of continuous improvement. Additional reports about the project have been published, are in press, or are in the pipeline. Further, many of the references in this document have full-text available online. We have provided live links for ease of access to these additional resources.

Educational objectives: 

Shared Decision-Making: Care is aligned with the values, preferences and cultural perspectives of the patient. Curricula focus is on communication skills necessary to promote patient’s self-efficacy.


Sustained Relationships: Care is designated to promote continuity of care; curricula focus on longitudinal learning relationships.


Interprofessional Collaboration: Care is team based, efficient and coordinated, curricula focus is on developing trustful, collaborative relationships.


Performance Improvement: Care is designed to optimize the health of populations; curricula focus on using the methodology of continuous improvement in redesigning care to achieve quality outcomes.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (2017). Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments 2011-2016 (S. Gilman & L. Traylor Eds.): United States Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Academic Affiliations. ISBN: 978-0-16-094202-0

Date posted: 
Wed, 05/16/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 05/16/2018
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Download Adobe pfd file
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Compendium of Five Case Studies: Lessons for Interprofessional Teamwork in Education and Workplace Learning Environments. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Advance Directives

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Advance Care Planning (ACP) is more than documenting life-sustaining treatment choices or identifying a surrogate decision-maker; it is a comprehensive, continuing communication and ‘shared decision-making’ process between the patient, family, and medical providers designed to document patient values and goals for treatment.

This interactive self- learning module is designed for undergraduate medical students with the goal of introducing learners to ACP while building their confidence in facilitating difficult conversations with patients. At the beginning of the module, we provide background on ACP including the challenges and benefits associated with the process. We showcase an elderly couple discussing how important it is to have advance directives in place. The second portion of the module reviews the common forms that are used to document advance directives and two patient case scenarios where the students can interact and reflect on the acquired content.

Educational objectives: 
  • Recognize the relevance in conducting and documenting advance directive discussions with patients.
  • List commonly used advance directives documents.
  • Develop the skills necessary to engage patients in a discussion about advance directives through the use of realistic patient case scenarios.
     
Date posted: 
Wed, 07/19/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 07/19/2020
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Interactive self learning module
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Advance Directives. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

VirginiaGeriatrics.Org

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The VirginiaGeriatrics.Org website consists of 6 primary resources and a secondary list of resources for further research. These primary resources include a video archive of the geriatric grand round lecture series, interactive pre-clinical basic science geriatric case studies for medical students, more advanced geriatric case studies for clinical residents, a quick consult guide for geriatric consults, an "ask the expert" discussion resource, and various educational materials related to the Virginia Geriatrics Society Conference. Additionally, spread through the website are external educational resources to complement the core material. Finally, there are some resources for patients and families that may be interested in contacting clinics and/or geriatricians.

Educational objectives: 

Listed through 6 primary education sections (Grand Rounds, Med Student Materials, Resident Materials, Quick Consults, Ask the Expert, etc)

Date posted: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
VirginiaGeriatrics.Org. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Elder Mistreatment

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Although estimates vary, it is generally believed that 11% of the elderly are abused. According to the National Incidence Study on Elder Abuse, approximately 450,000 elderly experienced abuse each year. If self-neglect is included, the number increases to 551,000. Elder mistreatment is too large of a problem for any one person or one discipline to resolve. Incorporating the expertise of all the members of the interprofessional healthcare team is critical to determine the facts in the situation and the motives of the people involved. Healthcare providers can only see what is presented in the clinical setting. There is so much of the story that may not be manifested in a routine exam and encounter. Having all team members knowledgeable about the sometimes subtle signs of elder mistreatment is helpful for eliciting information and devising a holistic intervention plan.

The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTSHC) Reynolds Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas (IGET-IT) Program has developed an Elder Mistreatment module as part of the Interprofessional Communication Improvement Modules (ICIM) Elder Safety series. The ICIM Elder Safety modules were created in collaboration with the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) and are supported, in part, by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. The goal of the Elder Safety ICIMs is to provide innovative and sustainable programs to improve the ability of physicians to work with other health disciplines in teams to provide better care for geriatric patients. The care of older adults can be very complex and studies have shown that a team approach can be most effective in leading to quality outcomes.

 

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Define “elder mistreatment”
  • Describe the prevalence of elder mistreatment in the US
  • Define the multiple forms of elder mistreatment
  • Identify risk factors for elder mistreatment
  • List indicators of elder mistreatment
  • Prioritize the steps of elder mistreatment assessment
  • Determine the approach for including an elder mistreatment assessment in an IP team model of geriatric assessment
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Marquez Hall, S. (2016, May). Assessment Tool for Elder Safety on the Topics of Falls Risk and Elder Mistreatment. Presented at American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting Education Product Showcase, Long Beach, CA.

Date posted: 
Wed, 10/05/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 10/05/2016
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Select your activities and add them to your cart. In the cart, click Proceed to Checkout. You will be prompted to create a new account or log in to your existing one. Once your account is created, you will be directed back to complete your registration.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Elder Mistreatment. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/38

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