The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Lecture

A classroom session (or similar venue) that can be presented in the form of a video or audio recording, slide presentation or a transcript, accompanied by speaker's notes. Should include any materials that would accompany the lecture, such as a handout.

(Y2S2) ELDER Project: Cognition, Dementia, Depression, Delirium.

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The curriculum is based onthe John A. Hartford Foundations' best practices in the care of older adults. This is session two of six that are targeted toward nursing assistants (NA) in home care and long term care settings. Topics for this session include: teaching the NA what to report to the nurse regarding patients who have cognitive changes; basic differences between depression, delirium and dementia; how to talk to patients who have cognitive changes.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of today’s session, the nursing assistant will be able to:

List two mental changes that you may see in older adults.

List two symptoms that you may see in an older adult who is depressed.

State two helpful hints when caring for an older adult with dementia.

 

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
(Y2S2) ELDER Project: Cognition, Dementia, Depression, Delirium. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y1S8) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Pain

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford best practices in the care of older adults, and this session is designed to assist care providers in long term or home care settings in assessing for and treating pain; and in providing palliative care for older adults. This is session 8 of 11 and is targeted toward Registered Nurses (RNs), LPNs, and other licensed health care professionals.  There are two modules within this session, Pain, and Palliative Care. Pain topics include: acute versus chronic pain; causes of pain; undertreatment; use of pain scales to assess pain; pharmacologic treatment and side effects of pain medications; non pharmacologic treatments and atypical presentation of pain in older adults. Palliative care topics include: World Health Organization definition of palliative care; philosophy and basic priniciples of palliative care; quality of life; final hours of life; and working within an interdisciplinary team for patients in need of palliative care.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss barriers to pain relief for older adults.
  2. Identify strategies in assessing pain in older adults.
  3. Identify strategies in treating pain in older adults.
  4. Define palliative care.
  5. Discuss the assessment parameters important to palliative care.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing (2001, 2003)
Mather LifeWays, 2003

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y1S8) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Pain. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y1S7) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Urinary Incontinence

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford best practices in the care of older adults. This is session 7 of 11 and is targeted toward Registered Nurses (RNs) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) and other licensed professionals. Topics include: Prevalence of urinary incontinence; bladder control issues; cost of incontinence; risk factors and types of incontinence; treatment options including pharmacologic and non pharmacologic methods; and risks of using indwelling catheters..

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the different types of urinary incontinence.
  2. Discuss assessment options for urinary incontinence.
  3. Discuss treatment options for urinary incontinence.
  4. Discuss appropriate and inappropriate uses of indwelling urinary catheters
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing (2001, 2003)
Mather LifeWays, 2003

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . (Y1S7) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Urinary Incontinence. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y1S6) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Pressure Ulcers & Nutrition

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford best practices in the care of older adults. This is session 6 of 11, and is targeted toward Registered Nurses (Rns) and Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) and other licensed health care professionals. The session is divided into 2 modules: Pressure Ulcers, and Nutrition. Pressure Ulcer topics include: Definition of pressure ulcers; prevention of, staging,  and tools to assess ulcers; risk assessments; early treatment; and dressing selection; Nutrition topics include: malnourishment in older adults; use of a food diary; physical assessment for nutritional status; hypoalbuminemia and lab tests to assess nutrition; anorexia; and factors that contribute to malnutrition on older adults.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Define Pressure Ulcer, including staging.
  2. Plan patient care for prevention of pressure ulcers.
  3. Assess diet history and nutritional status.
  4. Plan care to maximize the self-feeding capacity of older adults
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing (2001, 2003)
Mather LifeWays, 2003

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 11/25/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y1S6) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Pressure Ulcers & Nutrition. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y1S2) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Functional Status & Sleep

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

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The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford best practices in the care of older adults.This is Session 1 of 11, and is targeted toward Registerd Nurses (RNs) and LPNs. Topics include: Attitudes about Aging, Agism; Myths about aging; Cross Cultural Influences on Older Adults, Sensory Changes and their effect on communication with Older Adults.

 

The curriculum is based on the John A. Hartford best practices in the care of older adults.This is Session 2 of 11, and is targeted toward Registerd Nurses (RNs), LPNs,and other licensed health care professionals.  Topics include: Assessing the functional status of older adults; use of validated tools to assess function; planning strategies to promote function; describing normal changes to sleep patterns associated with age; identifying causes of sleep disturbances; and evaluating safey in homes of older adults.. 

Educational objectives: 
  1. Describe some characteristics of functional decline in older persons.
  2. Assess function using validated tools.
  3. Plan strategies to promote/maintain optimal function in older adults.
  4. Describe the normal changes in sleep patterns associated with age.
  5. Identify the causes of sleep disturbance among elderly adults.
  6. Discuss pertinent safety issues that should be evaluated upon a home visit.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing (2001, 2003)

 
Date posted: 
Fri, 11/25/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 11/25/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y1S2) ELDER Project: Best Nursing Practices: Functional Status & Sleep. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Precepting Challenging Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This exercise is designed for use in small Preceptor groups led by a faculty tutor. Participants will learn by observing the videos, sharing personal experiences, and discussing precepting approaches. The exercise uses video clips of a trainee and Preceptor in a clinical setting. In each of the cases, the trainee has been assigned a patient, has performed a history and physical examination of the patient, and is now prepared to make an oral case presentation to the Preceptor. The Preceptor is ready to listen to the case presentation and give appropriate feedback on the presentation. For the purpose of this exercise, the Preceptor’s role is limited to the case presentation and feedback provision. It is assumed that the Preceptor will later go to the bedside with the trainee to examine the patient, and together they will arrive at a working differential diagnosis and management plan.

Educational objectives: 

The purpose of this exercise is to enhance Preceptor skills with challenging trainees. At the end of the exercise, Preceptors will be able to:

  • Communicate and set expectations for trainees’ performance
  • Analyze trainees’ difficulties in oral case presentations
  • Recognize and correct own improper precepting behavior and attitude
  • Recognize and correct inappropriate behavior and attitudes of challenging trainees   
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Preceptorship is an essential component of medical education and clinical training. Precepting allows education to be individualized, links classroom knowledge to real patient management problems, and provides role modeling as the trainee develops knowledge, skills and attitudes for practice. In an idealized clinical practice teaching episode, the trainee performs the assessment and makes an oral case presentation to the Preceptor with a differential diagnosis and management plan outlined. The Preceptor refines the assessment and plan, and the trainee implements the plan with assistance as needed. As trainees gain experience with more patients over time, they are expected to increase their knowledge and skills, improve practice efficiency and effectiveness, and become increasingly independent in managing patient care. The Preceptor provides feedback and support to the student and evaluation data to both the student and course chair.

Although preceptorship is usually a positive experience for both teacher and trainee, problems occasionally arise. Sometimes this difficulty is related to poor student performance. Other problems may include poor communication between student and Preceptor, characteristics of the clinic or perhaps a poor match between the learning style of the trainee and the teaching style of the Preceptor. A “challenging student” may be frustrated, anxious, bored, overwhelmed, unprepared, distracted, ill, or have a true learning disability.  Errors in knowledge or skills are typically due to limited experience, unclear expectations, and inadequate feedback rather than the result of insufficient ability, interest, or care.

When presenting this material, it is important to consider adequate time allotted for the exercise. Completion of all three cases may require a workshop as long as 2.5 to 3 hours. If only one hour is available, it is more appropriate to focus on a single case, allowing adequate time for learning, group discussion and reflection.

This product can also be accessed at 
http://dev.medsch.ucla.edu/precepting/index.html
Date posted: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Precepting Challenging Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Gray Matters - Exploring the Mature Mind

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Gray Matters, a 27-minute documentary on the aging brain, focuses on the positive aspects of aging and on steps individuals can take to preserve their cognitive health as they age. The documentary features clinical and academic experts in several fields, but is also intended for general audiences. It is appropriate for college and graduate level health science classes, community groups, hospitals, senior centers and other audiences.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This is a project of the Wyoming Geriatric Education Center (WyGEC) with funding from UW Division of Social Work, Richard Chatham, the Wyoming Department of Health - Office of Multicultural Health, Cheyenne Regional Medical Center, the UW Area Health Education Center and with WyGEC funds provided by the Ellbogen Foundation for Excellence. In-kind support was provided by AARP Wyoming and the St. John’s Institute for Cognitive Health in Jackson, WY.

The video was produced by Wyoming PBS, a public television station licensed to Central Wyoming College, and Wyoming AARP. It is preceeded by several messages from these sponsors. 

Date posted: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , and . Gray Matters - Exploring the Mature Mind. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Cognitive Disorders

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This 20-slide PowerPoint presentation addresses the following issues: differences between reversible and irreversible cognitive disorders, non-dementia cognitive disorders, difference between delirium and dementia, various dementias and their symptoms, and treatment.

Educational objectives: 

Define and discuss cognitive disorders.

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Cognitive Disorders. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

The UAB Train the Trainer Experience: Teaching Geriatrics to Change Behavior

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

This product guides the user through a four-hour workshop aimed at teaching clinician educators how to teach four geriatrics topics: delirium, medication management, health literacy, and dementia. A variety of innovative teaching techniques are integrated into each topic area. There is an introductory session on adult learning theory, and all teaching techniques introduced in the workshop are based in these theories. All materials needed to teach the four topics are included in the guide.  

Educational objectives: 
  1. Name three key principles of adult learning theory.
  2. Describe three instructional techniques that illustrate principles of adult learning theory.
  3. Teach three key points about each of the following topics: delirium, dementia, medication management and health literacy.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Instructors that wish to present selected components of the experience will need to download the facilitators guide and only selected materials.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

This product was presented at the 2011 Donald W. Reynolds Foundation Annual Meeting in St. Louis, MO. 

Date posted: 
Tue, 01/01/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 01/01/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
The UAB Train the Trainer Experience: Teaching Geriatrics to Change Behavior. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Anatomy Image Atlas on Aging: Kidney

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The Image Atlas of Aging is an original UMMS educational product developed to highlight the normal age-related anatomic and histological changes within the renal system. The Image Atlas of Aging is a PowerPoint module that features normal gross and histological images to model the aging kidney – and to serve as an easily replicated prototype to eventually incorporate other organs and organ systems. The module introduces the principle of homeostenosis as a function of aging that emphasizes that aging is neither equivalent to disease nor does it signify inevitable disease. This original geriatrics content has been integrated into the first year medical student “Development, Structure, and Function” (DSF) course curriculum. This product contains two versions of the lecture: the complete presentation intended for the educator and the shortened student module. 

 

Educational objectives: 

After completion of their DSF course, the MS1 learner will be expected to:

  1. Explain that renal disease is not inevitable with normal aging
  2. Differentiate normal anatomic, physiologic, and histological differences between the young and aged kidney
  3. Define the principle of homeostenosis, illustrating how the renal system becomes more susceptible to acute injury with the loss of age-related functional reserve
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

There is a dearth of existing available educational resources that pictorially contrast normal age-related anatomic and histological organ system changes. (Most of the available resources demonstrate normal versus pathologic.)

Pivotal to Image Atlas completion was developing partnerships with the UMMS pathology department and anatomy and cell biology division. UMMS' Advancing Geriatrics Education (AGE)/Reynolds summer student, UMMS MS2 Patrick Bonavitacola, forged new working relationships with the director of surgical pathology and renal pathology, the current chief resident, and the co-director of the MS1 DSF course. Existing images were culled from: 1) the former chief of pathology's legacy slide collection within the UMMS pathology department, 2) dissections in the anatomy lab; and 3) recent autopsies in the pathology lab. Images were also incorporated from local textbooks and an image database taken with permission from the University of Connecticut.

Formal discussions have been held with the DSF course directors, who are currently reviewing the PowerPoint module and strategizing  how to best integrate this model and original content into the DSF curriulum. UMMS geriatricians will teach from this curriculum in the anatomy lab this fall.

Date posted: 
Mon, 05/13/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 05/13/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , and . Anatomy Image Atlas on Aging: Kidney. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

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