The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Lecture

A classroom session (or similar venue) that can be presented in the form of a video or audio recording, slide presentation or a transcript, accompanied by speaker's notes. Should include any materials that would accompany the lecture, such as a handout.

Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Although health care practitioners have a legal and ethical duty to identify and intervene in suspected cases of elder abuse and mistreatment, the existing lack of knowledge and perceived barriers to reporting often interferes with this duty. The goal of the elder abuse and mistreatment learning modules is to provide case-based training to health care professionals. The training consists of two presentation modules with embedded speaker notes. Module One: Identifying Elder Abuse, focuses on the descriptions, signs and symptoms of elder abuse and mistreatment. Module Two: Screening and Intervening, concentrates on screening for elder abuse and mistreatment and provides guidance for intervention. Combined, these modules provide a basic understanding of elder abuse and mistreatment to assist health care practitioners in identifying and reporting this prominent public health problem. 

Educational objectives: 

After reviewing these modules, participants will be able to:                      

  1. Describe three types of elder abuse.
  2. List five signs and symptoms that raise suspicion of elder abuse.
  3. Identify three factors for elder abuse and neglect.
  4. Determine the steps to screen for elder abuse.
  5. Describe three interventions for victims of elder abuse.
  6. Discuss three interventions for stressed caregivers.
  7. List common community resources available to elders and their families. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Many of the slides within these presentations contain animations. It would be advisable to closely review slides prior to presenting to an audience. Embedded speaker notes are an additional feature of the presentations. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Selected Citations:

  1. Dyer CB, Hyman DJ, Festa NA, Pavlik VN:  The Profile of Texas Adult Protective Services Clients with Multiple Reports.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 22, 1999.
  2. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Festa NA:  Elder Mistreatment:  Analysis of Allegation Types and Variables Associated with Multiple Allegations from a Statewide Database.  Selected for
  3. Presentation at the Presidential Poster Session at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Nashville, TN, May 20, 2000.Dyer CB, Toronjo C, Pavlik VN, Keith M, Silverman E:  How do Adult Protective Service
  4. Specialists Recognize Valid Self neglect.  Presented at the Gerontological Society Meeting, Washington D.C., November 19, 2000.
  5. Harrell R, Toronjo C, Dyer CB:  How do Geriatricians Diagnose Elder Abuse and Neglect?  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  6. Heath J, Dyer CB, Mosqueda L:  Partnering With Adult Protective Service Agencies for Educational Experiences in Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  7. Pavlik VN, Barth J, Khan F, Phung M, Lo M, Turner R, Hyman DJ, Dyer CB:  Abnormal Nutritional Markers in Elder Mistreatment Patients.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 17, 2001.
  8. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Mitchell B, Hyman DJ, Poythress EL:  Neurospychiatric Testing in Elders with Self-Neglect.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., May 11, 2002.
  9. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, Ma, November 24, 2002.
  10. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, MA, November 24, 2002.
  11. R Hariharan, SG Nash, VN Pavlik, J King, CB Dyer: Medical Complexities Among Elderly Abused and Neglected Patients. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  12. CB Dyer, VN Pavlik, T Regev, M Vogel, DJ Hyman, B Mitchell, EL Poythress: Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Unresolved Elder Mistreatment Cases. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  13. Poythress E, Tremaine B, Dyer CB: Self-Neglecters Who Live in Squalor. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  14. Dyer CB, Pavlik V, Delgado M, Regev C, Vogel B, Tremaine B: Characterizing Victims of Financial Exploitation. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  15. Patel A, Fisher CJW, Dyer CB: Characterizing Sexual Abuse in Older Adults. Presented at the  American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Las Vegas, Na, May 20, 2004.
  16. Kim L, Nieves L, Dyer CB:  Do Medical Examines Determine Elder Mistreatment as a Cause of Death?  Presented at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 14, 2005.
  17. Dyer CB, Nieves LE, Delossantos O, Barth J, Poythress EL, Vogel M, Tremaine B, Neycheril A, Harlan J, Kim L: The Cognitive, Functional and Social Profiles of 500 Cases of Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 11, 2005.
  18. Dyer CB, Kim LC: "Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, & Exploitation" Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefeld, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston, and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  19. Dyer CB,Kim LC: “Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation”, Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefield, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  20. Mehta MM, Dyer CB:  “A Practical Approach to Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation”, Practice of Geriatrics, 4th Edition, 2007.
  21. Brandl B, Dyer CB, Heisler CJ, Otto J, Stiegel L, Thomas R: Elder Abuse Detection and Intervention: A Collaborative Approach.  2006 Springer.

Selected Presentations:

  1. “ Elder Mistreatment: Identification, Treatment and the Prevention of Premature Death” Principles of Geriatric Care: A Certificate Program for Health Care Professionals,Houston, TX Feb 21, 2012
  2. “The Medical Signs of Abuse and Neglect”. Elder Justice Care Seminar, National Advocacy Center, Columbia, SC, January 5, 2011.
Date posted: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

House Calls 101

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is a power point presentation designed to help residents/ fellows/ physicians start to incorporate home visits into their practice. A start to finish guide from identifying the patient to completing the billing and follow up. Includes information on eligibility of patients, logisitics of making the visit, completing the paperwork and approximate medicare payments. By the end of the presentation learners should be comfortable in scheduling their first patients for a home visit. For physicians already performing home visits it is a refresher on caring for patients at home and following current medicare guidelines. Also there are some details on collaborating with an interdisciplinary team in the clinic or with home health agencies.

Educational objectives: 

At the end of the presentation the learner should be able to:

  • Identify patients that would likely benefit from house calls
  • Select the equipment necessary for a basic house call
  • Understand how to set up and perform a house call and bill for the service
  • Implement house calls as part of your regular practice
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This lecture has been reviewed and approved by the University of New Mexico Geriatric Division Geriatric Interest Rounds.

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/08/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/08/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
House Calls 101. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Handover and Care Transitions Training for Internal Medicine Residents

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The presentations and exercises in this resource are intended to serve as introductory training tools for interns and residents for them to better perform care transitions. In this context, care transitions are defined as “the movement patients make between health care practitioners and settings as their condition and care needs change during the course of a chronic or acute illness” (Care Transitions Program, http://caretransitions.org). For our training exercises, we have focused on two types of transitions: handovers of patients between hospital providers, as well as hospital discharges.

In this resource, we have two different training experiences offered to internal medicine interns and residents at the Emory University School of Medicine: a two-hour workshop on care transitions issues offered to interns during their initial orientation, as well as an interactive presentation given to all residents a month into the academic year.

Educational objectives: 

After completing the course, learners should be able to:

  1. Identify what patient information should be included at handover.
  2. Communicate the essential elements of a nightly handover.
  3. Recognize patients at risk during transitions of care.
  4. Communicate clearly with patients and families, and members of the health care team during hospital discharge.
  5. Manage discharge medications to ensure safety and patient adherence.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Effectiveness and Significance
The enclosed learning materials are part of a comprehensive curriculum for internal medicine interns and residents addressing care transitions in the hospital. It specifically covers handovers of patients in the hospital, as well as issues regarding patient care at discharge.

On the first implementation of this curriculum during the 2010-2011 academic year, the interns receiving the initial orientation gave the course a 4.1/5 in terms of perceived effectiveness. Interns’ confidence in their ability to perform care transitions tasks improved from 19.8 to 25.7 on a 30-point scale (p<0.0001), and knowledge scores improved from 4.5 to 5.7 out of 8 (p<0.0001), from pre- to post-course. After the course, 79% (34 of 43) answered “agree” or “strongly agree” when asked whether the course played a key role in their ability to hand over patients. 67% (29 of 43) answered “agree” or “strongly agree” when asked the same question about their ability to discharge patients.

This was the first dedicated curriculum on handovers or care transitions for medical residents at the Emory University School of Medicine. The lectures and exercises included in this resource are the core of a longitudinal care transitions curriculum that is now part of Emory's internal medicine training program.

Special Implementation Guidelines or Requirements
The materials contained in this package are meant to help with training of internal medicine (or family medicine) interns and residents on issues surrounding care transitions. The files attached were utilized for two distinct sessions: a two-hour session during the weeklong intern orientation, as well as an hourlong core lecture given a month later for the entire class of PGY 1-3 in Medicine.

Implementation of Intern Orientation
Detailed instructions on how to implement the exercises involved in intern orientation are in the attached documents. About two hours would be required for the exercise. Forty-five minutes would be used for the initial slide presentation, and about one hour would be used for the small group exercises. The handover and discharge summary exercises should be carried out dividing the larger class into groups of no more ten interns. The number of faculty required for this exercise will depend on the size of the intern class.

Core Lecture
The lecture can be given by one faculty member in a conference room. There is no predetermined limit on class size, as the interactive parts can be performed by asking residents to work in pairs and then having a discussion with the larger group.

The first document we recommend reading is facilitator_guide.doc, which contains instructions for both sessions.

Lessons Learned
We have received encouraging feedback for our training sessions on care transitions. The most important challenge we've worked with has been the integration of the lessons learned in the course into daily clinical practice. Our on care transitions transitions is very skills-oriented, so we needed to work with the faculty and administration at our different clinical sites to make sure that the skills our residents were learning were able to be integrated into clinical practice.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Eskildsen M, Bonsall J, Miller A, Ohuabunwa U, Payne C, Rimler E, et al. Handover and Care Transitions Training for Internal Medicine Residents. MedEdPORTAL; 2012. Available from: www.mededportal.org/publication/9101

Date posted: 
Thu, 03/22/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 03/22/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Handover and Care Transitions Training for Internal Medicine Residents. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Building a Palliative Care Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is a PPT presentation given to the NJ Hospital Association's Council on End-of-life and Palliative Care. This presentation looks at the tools needed to start a Palliative Care Program in various settings. From this presentation, the reader will learn how to make an inventory of their own needs as well as those of the facility where they are intending to begin the program. There is a step-by-step approach delineated as to how to assess your stakeholders and address their needs. Once the program has been considered, the reader will learn how to make the appropriate "pitch" to the administrators and stakeholders of the facility to appeal to the monetary as well as humanitarian aspects of care. The reader will also learn about sources of funding and how to make a program that is sustainable and will become a staple in the institution.

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Building a Palliative Care Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

In-Class Writing Portfolio

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

The in-class writing portfolio product is comprised of three items:  1) instructions for the student and theoretical underpinnings 2) PowerPoint presentation on dysphagia: safety vs. autonomy, and 3) case illustration on Mr. Kane: Autonomy versus Beneficence and Justice.

Educational objectives: 

The purpose of the in-class writing portfolio is to provide opportunities for students to interact with material presented in class, writing about how it makes them feel, or their understanding of the relevance to nursing. This moves the material from rote memory to integration and synthesis.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

From the course NUR 552/652: Understanding & Intervening in Common Mental Health Problems of Elders

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
In-Class Writing Portfolio. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This session is based on the ELNEC (End of Life Nursing Educational Consortium) curriculum and contains activities and information regarding best practices in end of life care. The module focuses on basic principles of palliative care including dying well, sources of suffering, life closure, quality of life, causes of death, interdisciplinary teams, and hospice services and billing. There are several suggested group activities. Both licensed and unlicensed professionals are the target audience.

Educational objectives: 
By the end of the session, the participant will be able to:
  1. Discuss the concept of “dying well” and how it applies to end-of-life (EOL) care.
  2. Compare and contrast the concepts of palliative care and hospice care.
  3. Describe the role of the health care team in providing quality palliative care for elder patients in various care settings.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

City of Hope & the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2007; Revised, 2010. The End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)- Geriatric Training Program and Curriculum is a project of the City of Hope (Betty R. Ferrell, PhD, FAAN, Principal Investigator) in collaboration with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (Pam Malloy, RN, MN, OCN, Co-Investigator).

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009). End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Factsheet. Retrieved February 9, 2009, from http://www.aacn.nche.edu/elnec/about.htm
Wilkie, D. J., Judge, M. K., Wells, M. J., & Berkley, I. M. (2001). Excellence in teaching end-of-life care: A new multimedia toolkit for nurse educators. Nursing and Health Care Perspectives, 22, 226 -230.

http://www.ct.gov/longtermcare/cwp/view.asp?a=1398...
©2001 D.J. Wilkie & TNEEL Investigators

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/25/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y6S1) ELDER Project: Palliative Care - Basic Principles. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Care of Older Adults Case Study

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

Two case studies (the Bradys and the Fifes) outline medications and positive coping factors for each.  True or False sections test students’ knowledge.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify areas of bio-psycho-social & spiritual areas for geropsychiatric nursing assessment.
  2. Identify risk factors r/ to geropsychpathology.
  3. Distinguish between delirium and dementia (particularly Alzheimers Disease = A.D.) in characteristics, onset, and course of disease.
  4. Formulate nursing diagnosis, expected outcomes, and interventions for patients with impaired cognition, and accompanying behavioral challenges.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Care of Older Adults slide set is from GNRS 584: Mental Health Nursing.

Identified by the Geropsychiatric Nursing Collaborative as being useful for infusing geropsychiatric nursing content into curricula.See Geropsychiatric Nursing Curriculum Materials.

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/04/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Care of Older Adults Case Study. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Medicare Hospice Benefit Game

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

One of the most significant barriers for patients receiving hospice services is the lack of medical providers’ knowledge regarding what hospice is and what it offers (JHPN. 2009;11(5):291-301). The AAMC lists “presenting palliative care (including hospice) as a positive, active treatment option for a patient with advanced disease” as one of its minimum competencies for medical students. Yet few physician trainees are provided with formal end-of-life care training (Sullivan AM, Lakoma MD and Block SD. J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Sep;18(9);685-95).

The Medicare Hospice Benefit (MHB) Game is a competency-based educational tool designed to evaluate physician trainee’s knowledge of the MHB and their comfort describing services provided by the MHB while educating them in an interactive format.

Educational objectives: 
  1. To present palliative care (including hospice) as a positive, active treatment option for a patient with advanced disease.
  2. To identify services that are covered and not-covered by the Medicare Hospice Benefit.
  3. To outline the process of certifying a patient as eligible for hospice care.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Effectiveness and Significance
Internal Medicine Interns (n=24) at the University of Utah have played the game during their geriatrics rotation. The interns completed a pre-game survey, which assessed their self-reported knowledge of the MHB and their comfort describing the MHB to patients. The interns were given 10-15 minutes to sort a set of 30 cards with statements about the MHB into a true or false pile and record the statements they miscategorize on an answer sheet. Detailed answers were distributed and a preceptor leads a 30-45 minute interactive discussion about the MHB. At the conclusion of the session the interns completed a post-game survey assessing changes in their knowledge and comfort. Both pre and post-game surveys utilized a 7-point Likert scale for measurement. Prior to playing the game, the interns’ self-reported comfort describing services provided by the MHB was low 2.2 (± 1.1). This was congruent with the objective assessment of the interns’ knowledge of the MHB as measured by the mean game score of 63.9% (± 8.9). The baseline knowledge scores of interns that played the game after completing a substantial portion of their internship were no better than those who played at the beginning. After playing the MHB game the intern’s self-reported comfort describing the MHB improved to 5.9 (± 0.9), they strongly agreed that the game added to their knowledge of the MHB 6.4 (± 0.7) and was enjoyable 6.0 (± 1.1).

Lessons Learned
Explaining the MHB is an important core competency that is not learned passively through completion of a medicine internship. The MHB game is an effective and enjoyable way to improve physician trainee’s knowledge of the MHB and their comfort explaining hospice services.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Brandon S. Medicare Hospice Benefit Game. MedEdPORTAL; 2011. Available from: www.mededportal.org/publication/9058

Presidential Poster Award at the American Geriatrics Society annual meeting.

Selected for the American Geriatrics Society meeting material and methods swap.

Date posted: 
Tue, 03/13/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 03/13/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Medicare Hospice Benefit Game. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Dementia and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake.  A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards.  Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Dementia and Aging "ACOVE" is number 3 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 

1.  Differentiate dementia from delirium and depression

2.  Recall the testing characteristics of screening instruments

3.  Differentiate types of dementia

4.  Recognize and manage caregiver stress

2.  Demonstrate appropriately 3 screening instruments to differentiate dementia, delirium, and depression

 

 

Date posted: 
Tue, 06/12/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 06/12/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Dementia and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

(Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

 


Both licensed and unlicensed participants discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of several different cultures and the impact these factors have on health care.



Educational objectives
  1.  
Educational objectives: 
  1. Compare and contrast the belief systems of Judaism and Islam.
  2. Discuss the role of religion, traditional health care beliefs, social values, and family structure of Judaism and Islam and the impact these factors have on health care.
  3. Identify specific culturally sensitive practices that can be incorporated into your work with Jewish and Muslim patients.
  4. Define culture and how it is reflected in our everyday lives.
  5. Distinguish between visible and invisible aspects of culture.
  6. Explain how the invisible aspects of culture influence the visible aspects of culture.
  7. Specific cultures include African American, Hispanic, Asian Indian, Jewish, Islam, Vietnamese, and Russian.
  8. Define and discuss components associated with cultural competence.
  9. Acknowledge healthcare disparities amongst cultures within healthcare.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

 

Date posted: 
Sun, 01/01/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 12/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . (Y5SJI) ELDER Project: Cultural Diversity: Judaism and Islam. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/36

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