The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Curriculum/Syllabus

An instructional plan of lessons and objectives aimed at helping learners gain a particular set of skills and knowledge. This plan can include a reading list, syllabus, lesson plan or course outline. Sometimes describes the implementation of programs such as chief residency training or student mentor programs.

SMILE: Senior Mentor Independent Living Education Program with Meals-on-Wheels

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

This is a one-morning community experience pairing a medical student with a volunteer driver (age 65+) for the local Meals-on-Wheels program.  The student accompanies the driver on the delivery route and en route conducts a life history of the driver and delivers a prevention message on an aspect of healthy aging.  Afterwards, the student writes a reflection paper on the experience with this high-functioning senior.  Students evaluate the experience and are evaluated by the driver and a faculty member on professionalism and communications. Evaluation forms are included.

Educational objectives: 
  • Successful aging
  • Self-care capacity
  • Professionalism
  • Communication
  • Interviewing skills
  • Prevention counseling
  • Attitudes toward older adults
Date posted: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . SMILE: Senior Mentor Independent Living Education Program with Meals-on-Wheels. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Syllabus for an Internal Medicine Residency Program Rotation in Geriatrics

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This syllabus provides the layout for a residency program curriculum with a rotation in ambulatory geriatric medicine. It integrates self-paced didactics with relevant clinical experience.

Date posted: 
Thu, 01/27/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 01/27/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Syllabus for an Internal Medicine Residency Program Rotation in Geriatrics. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Student/Senior Partner Program (SSPP)-Medical Student Handbook

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This handbook is designed for first-year medical students participating in a Student/Senior partnership program.  The overall focus is the patient-physician relationship.  It provides basic information about the Student SeniorPartner Program (SSPP), its guidelines and requirements.

Educational objectives: 

Participating in the Student Senior Partner Program (SSPP) will allow the student to develop a strong foundation in patient-centered medical care by focusing on patient-doctor relationship and skills in communication, health literacy and shared decision making. 

Date posted: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/28/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Student/Senior Partner Program (SSPP)-Medical Student Handbook. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Vision and Aging in Older Adult Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Vision and Aging "ACOVE" is number 1 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify whether an eye exam has been done within the past year
  2. Perform a funduscopic exam and identify if the patient had Primary Open Angle Glaucoma, Cataracts, Age Related Macular Degeneration, or Diabetic Retinopathy. 
  3. Refer the patient to Ophthalmology if an eye exam has not been done within the past year or if the funduscopic exam shows signs of 1 of the 4 most common diseases.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The lecture is available in video format at the website. (http://mcintranet.musc.edu/agingq3/visionacove1.htm)

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/11/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/11/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Vision and Aging in Older Adult Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Falls and Mobility of Older Adult Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Falls and Mobility "ACOVE" is number 2 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Recognize the risk factors, consequences, and interventions associated with falls in the older adult patient. 
  2. Demonstrate a "Timed Up and Go" test on an older adult patient.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Caton C, Wiley MK, Zhao Y, Moran WP, Zapka J. Improving internal medicine residents' falls assessment and evaluation: an interdisciplinary, multistrategy program. J Am Geriatr Soc. Oct 2011;59(10):1941-1946. Also available online

Date posted: 
Thu, 08/23/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 08/23/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Falls and Mobility of Older Adult Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Elder Patient Navigator Program 2.0

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Navigator Program is a novel University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) geriatric curricular initiative that targets first and second year medical and nursing students. Initially conceived by a UMMS medical student, the Navigator Program is based around the health care encounters of older patients in the ambulatory setting. Students are paired with older patients, whom they “navigate” through outpatient medical encounters to help the patient more fully understand health problems and treatments.

Educational objectives: 

After completing the Navigator Program, the medical or nursing student learner will be able to:

  • Consider the complexity of multiple medical morbidities, polypharmacy, involvement of family members and/or caretakers, and possible cognitive impairment when communicating with older persons in the ambulatory clinical setting.
  • Demonstrate how to accurately reconcile a patient’s medications, including prescribed, herbal, and over-the-counter medications.
  • Develop communication skills for effectively relating to older patients and apply them during their clinical years.
  • Recognize health literacy issues affecting older patients.
  • Consider how integrative geriatric care is managed across specialties, particularly cardiology, orthopedics, psychiatry, and oncology.  
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The pilot Navigator Program was instituted during the 2009-2010 academic year through which 11 medical students were trained as Student Navigators (SNs), serving a total of 22 patients in an outpatient cardiology clinic (http://www.pogoe.org/node/2458). Based on pilot program evaluation data and a student focus group discussion facilitated by geriatrician faculty advisors, the intention of the program has been changed such that each student is now paired with one older patient whom they navigate throughout an academic year in order to provide a more longitudinal patient-centered experience. Geriatrician faculty advisors and preceptors in the UMMS Longitudinal Preceptor Program now allow SNs to see patients in their respective practices while longitudinally following those patients to sub-specialist appointments.

Faculty advisors and student leaders jointly developed a Student Navigator Resource Handbook for the new Navigator 2.0 program, which includes relevant geriatric literature and teaching modules specifically in the areas of effective older patient-physician communication with older adults, geriatric prescribing and medication reconciliation, and geriatric specialty-specific considerations (cardiology, orthopedics, psychiatry).  During the academic year, geriatrician faculty advisors facilitate three small group sessions with participating SNs to teach the module.

The Navigator Program 2.0 was developed by the University of Massachusetts Medical School Advancing Geriatrics Education (AGE) program, which is supported by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. 

One of the keys in piloting the Navigator Program at UMMS was the involvement of a Student Navigator Leader, one of the leaders of the medical school’s student-run Geriatrics Interest Group (GIG).  The Student Navigator Leader is a second year medical student who is responsible for the day-to-day management of the program, including the oversight of Student Navigator orientation and the collection of all Navigator program evaluation data.  (To encourage and support these student leaders, the co-leaders of the GIG receive a modest stipend through our Reynolds grant, in part, for Navigator Program leadership.)  Prospective Navigators are recruited through GIG-sponsored luncheons and student group meeting presentations, as well as through direct classmate recruitment by the GIG leaders and members.

Two geriatrician faculty in the Division of Geriatric Medicine, appointed as faculty advisors to the Navigator Program, are responsible for weekly meetings with the Student Navigator Leaders, mentoring student leadership development, and oversight of data collection and analysis.

New SNs are trained jointly by geriatrician faculty advisors and experienced SNs using a “Train-the-Trainers” model.  Current Navigators train new Navigators, who are given a newly developed Student Navigator Resource Handbook upon enrollment, which includes professional literature specific to geriatric prescribing, medication reconciliation, effective communication with older persons, and geriatric specialty-specific considerations.  The Student Navigator leaders oversee new SN training and meet weekly with the geriatricians for mentoring.  The geriatrician faculty advisors facilitate small groups with participating SNs three times during the academic year to teach the modules presented in the Handbook.

Once trained, the SN accompanies their assigned older patient into the examination room, taking notes on a standardized template to document vital signs, test results, assessments, instructions, and medication changes.  Immediately following the visit, the SN summarizes the information with the patient (and caregiver) and provides a copy of the standardized encounter form which includes a reconciled medication list that has been signed by the participating physician.

Additional features built into Navigator 2.0 include an exit interview with the patient (and family) to discuss their respective experiences with the program, as well as how the Navigator Program influenced the SN's own communication style and outlook before entering residency. Additionally, the SN is required to navigate their patient a minimum of three times during the academic year to receive credit for participation. It is also expected that the Navigator Program will become an officially sanctioned Optional Enrichment Elective through the UMMS Office of Medical Education.

Four Program Evaluation forms are used in the Navigator Program, and have been revamped for Navigator 2.0 to represent the updated goals and geriatric competencies of the new curricula (three modules in the newly developed Handbook).

  1. Student Survey
  2. Patient Survey
  3. Provider Survey
  4. Overall Student Survey

Patients are asked to complete an evaluation form, which may either be completed and returned to the SN at the end of the session or later mailed to the Student Navigator Leader in a self-addressed stamped envelope provided to the patient. The Student Navigators are responsible for returning completed evaluation forms to the Student Navigator Leader, who oversees the collection of all evaluation data. The Student Navigator Leader also collects monthly evaluations from participating physicians. After collecting all these various forms, the Student Navigator Leader forwards all evaluation data to the UMMS Division of Research and Evaluation.

For more information on this program at UMMS, go to http://umassmed.edu/AGE/Navigator.aspx.


 

Date posted: 
Thu, 04/14/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 04/14/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , and . Elder Patient Navigator Program 2.0. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Dementia

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module was designed to teach medical students about dementia. It is used in combination with a discussion group about the case studies, in order to apply the learned material as well as discuss any questions that may have arisen. Topics include identification and workup of various types of dementia, including Alzheimers, Vascular, Frontotemporal, and Pseudodementia secondary to a variety of underlying conditions. In addition, the module includes information about disease progression and prognosis. Various pharmacologic and environmental treatment options are also discussed.

Educational objectives: 

Attitudes - Medical students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the complexities of an older patient with dementia
  • Have an increased comfort level in diagnosing the various types of dementia in older adults

Knowledge - Medical students should be able to:

  • Describe the cost implications of dementia in an increasingly older population
  • Identify the various dementia syndromes
  • Identify diagnostic criteria of dementia and cognitive impairment
  • Identify the stages of Alzheimer’s dementia
  • Identify ways to minimize decline of functional disabilities
  • Discuss the ethical and legal issues surrounding patients with dementia, especially advanced directives
  • Describe possible caregiver support systems

Skils - Medical students should be able to:

  • Follow diagnostic criteria in patients suspected of dementia
  • Develop a treatment plan for patients with confirmed dementia
  • Develop both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic care for patients with dementia
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Please review the Objectives, Content material, and Cases before our class session. We will apply the tasks in the Skills Objectives to these cases, and you should think about them ahead of time.

Date posted: 
Tue, 01/18/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 01/18/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Dementia. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Advance Directives

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module is intended to assist in teaching undergraduate medical students about advance health care planning; including, the various documents available to the provider for discussion and documentation of the wishes of patients and their surrogate decision makers. This module also discusses the issues of determination of decisional capacity and competency, with an approach provided to assess decision-making capacity. Additionally, students are provided information on the advance directive discussion and communicating with patients, families and surrogate decision makers.

Educational objectives: 

Attitudes - Medical students should be able to:

  1. Realize the importance of establishing the wishes of the patient prior to their loss of decisional-capacity when surrogacy would be required.
  2. Realize the importance of the role of the health care provider in providing the patient and their family a realistic and clear understanding of the patient's clinical situation and likely prognosis.
  3. Acquire an ability to effectively engage patients and families in discussion of these issues.

Knowledge - Medical students should be able to:

  1. Discuss a Living Will, including the definition, acquisition, utility, and limitations.
  2. Discuss a Health Care Treatment Directive, including the definition, acquisition, utility, and limitations.
  3. Discuss a DNR, including the definition, acquisition, utility, and limitations.
  4. Discuss a Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, including the definition, acquisition, utility, and limitations.
  5. Recognize the cognitive and emotional qualities which contribute to the assessment of competency and decision-making capacity.
  6. Recognize the scope and importance of the legal context of advance directives.
  7. Recognize the importance of selected issues relating to advance directives.
  8. Describe how to appropriately begin the advance directive discussion.
  9. Describe the importance of communicating with families and surrogates concerning advance directives.
  10. Describe the importance of clarifying unclear statements.
  11. Describe the best approach to documenting the discussion of advance directives.

Skills - Medical students should be able to:

  1. Define the following entities and discuss how one acquires such a document: Living Will, Health Care Treatment Directive, DNR, Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care.
  2. Participate in a family "discussion" about these entities and recommend appropriate interventions for the patients presented in the case that follows and the Standardized Patient Encounter.
  3. Create a framework for how one would initiate and/or discuss such issues with real patients and families.
Date posted: 
Sat, 10/16/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sat, 10/16/2010
Product Viewing Instructions: 
N/A
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Advance Directives. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Curriculum for an Integrated Geriatric-Oncology-Hematology Fellowship

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

This curriculum lists the ABIM requirements for combined fellowship training in Geriatrics and the subspecialities of hematology and/or oncology and includes descriptions of the clinical, educational, and research venues through which the training can be accomplished.

Educational objectives: 

At the end of training (36 months for combined Medical Oncology and Geriatric Medicine or combined Hematology and Geriatric Medicine; 48 months for Hematology, Medical Oncology, and Geriatric Medicine), the fellow will be able to do the following:

  1. Provide competent, compassionate care to adults, age 65 and over, across the continuum of care while also appropriately caring for their malignancy or hematological disorder
  2. Evaluate and treat older adults who have chronic illnesses, including geriatric syndromes, with the overarching goal of preserving function and quality of life
  3. Demonstrate effective communication with patients and families, interacting with them in a respectful manner
  4. Interact effectively and respectfully with other disciplines who provide care to older adults, especially geriatric interdisciplinary teams
  5. Teach medical students, residents and other professionals key concepts and principles of geriatric medicine
  6. Demonstrate scholarly activity in the field of Geriatric Medicine and Hematology or Oncology
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Assumes that an academic geriatric program and an academic hematology/oncology program are already in existence

Date posted: 
Mon, 12/07/2009
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/23/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Curriculum for an Integrated Geriatric-Oncology-Hematology Fellowship. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2009 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Elder Patient Navigator Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The Navigator Program is a geriatric education curriculum for medical students based on a service program for older patients. Students are paired with older patients, whom they “navigate” through their medical encounters to help them more fully understand their health problems and treatment. Through this structured curriculum and pre-clinical immersive experience, students gain important knowledge in how to communicate with older patients, the complexity of chronic disease management, medication reconciliation, and the role of family supports. The Navigator Program was developed by the University of Massachusetts Medical School Advancing Geriatrics Education (AGE) program, which is supported by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

Educational objectives: 

After completing the program, the medical student learner will be able to:

  1. Consider the complexity of multiple medical co-morbidities, polypharmacy, involvement of family members and/or caretakers, and possible cognitive impairment when communicating with older persons in the ambulatory clinical setting.
  2. Demonstrate how to accurately reconcile a patient’s medications, including prescribed, herbal, and over-the-counter medications.
  3. Develop communication skills for effectively relating to older patients and apply them during their clinical years.
  4. Weigh standard recommendations for health screenings and treatments with the age, functional status, and the goals of care for their older patients.
  5. Reflect upon the psychological, social, and spiritual needs of their patients with advanced illness and their family members.
  6. Recognize health literacy issues affecting older patients.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Getting Started – Recruitment:

a) Faculty Advisors – Faculty Advisors work closely with medical students involved in the Medical School’s Geriatrics Interest Group (GIG). One GIG student is appointed the Student Navigator Leader and Faculty Advisors meet bi-monthly with the Student Navigator Leader to offer counsel, review the past month’s Navigator data, and discuss recent evaluation data from students, patients, and faculty. A Student Navigator Resource Handbook is developed by the Faculty Advisors and distributed to new Student Navigators with relevant articles in the areas of effective older patient-physician communication, polypharmacy in the elderly, and the burden of multiple co-morbidities on older patients.

b) Medical student champions – One of the keys to success in piloting the Navigator Program at our Medical School was the early involvement of a student champion, a GIG co-leader who initially conceived of the project. GIG leaders have continued as the Student Navigator Leader, the student in charge of the day-to-day management of the program, orientation of Prospective Navigators, and collecting and collating evaluation data. To encourage and support these student champions, the co-leaders of the GIG receive a modest stipend through our Reynolds grant, partly for their efforts in leading the Navigator Program. Medical student leadership is central to the program, which is designed to promote student leadership development through the mentorship of the Faculty Advisors. To ensure the ongoing training of new Student Navigators, a “train-the-trainer” model is used, with second-year Student Navigators responsible for training entering first year Student Navigators. Students are recruited through GIG-sponsored lunches and presentations at student group meetings, and by direct recruitment of classmates by the GIG leaders and members.

c) Outpatient clinic sites: Initially, we recommend piloting the Navigator Program at a single outpatient clinic site especially receptive to the goals of the program. We identified the physician director of a specialty clinic who has been supportive of geriatrics education. The clinic director recruited other clinic physicians to participate in the program. Faculty Advisors and Student Navigator Leaders meet with all clinic staff, including the nurse manager, nurses, medical assistants, and the desk staff. Space is also an important consideration in clinic choice to guarantee privacy for the student and patient to meet after the doctor’s visit and should be actively sought.

d) Recruiting older patients: Patients are recruited through diverse outreach efforts, including GIG leader presentations at local senior centers, and the distribution of English-Spanish bilingual brochures both as part of these presentations as well as in the participating clinics. An email account and a telephone number with voice mail have been set up for patients to conveniently request a Student Navigator. The Student Navigator Leader is responsible for monitoring both the email and voicemail accounts as well as the follow-up phone calls to patients confirming arrangements for an assigned Student Navigator to be present at an upcoming appointment. Participating physicians can also identify patients in their practice they believe would benefit from the Navigator Program and notify the Student Navigator Leader. Such patients are contacted by Student Navigators several days prior to their scheduled appointment to determine if they would like to participate in the program.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

G. Blanchard, C. DuBeau, S. McGee, et. al., The University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA. "The Navigator Program: Patient Support Instructs Geriatrics Medical Education." Poster to be presented at The American Geriatrics Society annual meeting, Orlando, FL, May 12-15, 2010.

Date posted: 
Fri, 01/01/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 08/09/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , , , and . Elder Patient Navigator Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

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