The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Curriculum/Syllabus

An instructional plan of lessons and objectives aimed at helping learners gain a particular set of skills and knowledge. This plan can include a reading list, syllabus, lesson plan or course outline. Sometimes describes the implementation of programs such as chief residency training or student mentor programs.

Achieving Quality Improvement and ACGME Core Competency Training Through a Nursing Home Polypharmacy Intervention

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

Polypharmacy is common in elderly nursing home patients and predisposes them to risk of potentially inappropriate medication uses, potential drug-drug interactions, and increased health care costs. This innovative model of an educational quality improvement intervention project addresses polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among nursing home residents using standardized tools and fulfills the ACGME core competencies of Practice-based Learning and Improvement and Systems-based Practice for Geriatric Medicine trainees.The intervention consists of 6 phases: pre-intervention training session, identification of target population, data collection, identification of potentially inappropriate medications, identification of potential drug-drug interactions and contraindications, and implementation. The intervention requires approximately 5 hours for 5-7 fellows and faculty geriatricians for 70-80 nursing home residents with polypharmacy. We found that the intervention worked best when incorporated into protected didactic "workgroup" sessions.This intervention increases medication safety, reduces medication costs and provides practical experience and education on polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use to Geriatric Medicine trainees and nursing home community physicians.

Educational objectives: 
  1. To fulfill ACGME core competencies of Practice-based Learning and Improvement and Systems-based Practice for Geriatric Medicine fellows.
  2. To provide practical education on polypharmacy and inappropriate medication uses among nursing home residents to Geriatric Medicine fellows and nursing home community physicians.
  3. To provide practical experience in a nursing home quality improvement project.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The tools used in this intervention are the Beers Criteria to identify potentially inappropriate medications and the Epocrates online drug-drug interaction program to identify potential drug-drug interactions and contraindications. These tools can be replaced by more updated or relevant tools according to settings or target populations to optimize the intervention effects.

We recommend using the updated Beers Criteria: freely available on the American Geriatrics Society Website: http://www.americangeriatrics.org/health_care_prof...

We found that the implementation of this quality improvement project was most successful when there was a dedicated faculty geriatrician overseeing the project. We designated "workgroup" times on the didactic schedule for the Geriatric Medicine trainees to review the selected patients' charts to complete the data collection form. The faculty geriatrician and the trainees discussed the potential recommendations for each patient as a group, which was also very helpful and provided an additional method of teaching. We also found it very helpful to have the nursing home consultant pharmacist and nursing home director of nursing assist in identifying the nursing home patients with polypharmacy and providing input about the impact of the project on the nursing home staff. We had very positive feedback from both the consultant pharmacist and director of nursing about this project.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Publications:

Tamura BK, Bell C, Lubimir K, Iwasaki W, Ziegler L, Masaki K. Physician Intervention for Medication Reduction in a Nursing Home: The Polypharmacy Outcomes Project. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2011; 12(5):326-30.

Kojima G, Bell C, Tamura BK, Inaba M, Lubimir K, Blanchette PL, Iwasaki W, Masaki K. Reducing Cost by Reducing Polypharmacy: The Polypharmacy Outcomes Project. J Am Med Dir Assoc.2012 Sep 4. [Epub ahead of print]

Presentations:

Lorenzo P, Bell C, Iwasaki W, Masaki K, Blanchette P. Polypharmacy Improvement Adherence Project: Nursing Home Medication Cost Outcomes. Poster presentation at American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, May 2009, (role: Co-mentor, co-author of Fellow Pia Lorenzo). Abstract in J Am Geriatr Soc 2009; 57(1, suppl): S147-148.

Lubimir K, Ziegler L, Bell C, Masaki K, Iwasaki W, Blanchette P. "Cost-Effectiveness of Reducing Polypharmacy in a Nursing Home: The Polypharmacy Outcomes Project." Poster Presentation, American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Washington, D.C., May 2008 (role: Co-mentor, co-author of Fellow Karen Lubimir). Abstract in J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56(1, suppl): S50-51.

Ziegler L, Lubimir K, Bell C, Masaki K, Iwasaki W, Blanchette P. “Medication Reduction in a Teaching Nursing Home: The Polypharmacy Outcomes Project.” Poster Presentation, American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Washington, D.C., May 2008, (role: Co-mentor, co-author of Fellow Laura Ziegler). Abstract in J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56(1, suppl): S49-50.

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/07/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/07/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Achieving Quality Improvement and ACGME Core Competency Training Through a Nursing Home Polypharmacy Intervention. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Office-Based Inter-Professional Care Transitions Curriculum for Third Year Medical Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

This product consists of a series of activities conducted as a month-long module among third-year medical students during their ambulatory rotation aimed at educating them about provider-related factors in care transitions and best practices that assure patient safety during transitions. This product is also aimed at educating the students on the critical role of the receiving outpatient physician in care coordination and inter-professional collaboration during the transitions period. The activities are delivered in the context of an interactive case-based learning workshop followed by month-long web-based activities. 

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Structure the post discharge visit and perform post discharge outpatient best practices including medication reconciliation, review of a discharge summary with implementation of critical elements of the discharge care plan.
  2. Identify patient discharge care needs including factors that present a risk for re-hospitalization; develop a multidisciplinary care plan to address identified needs.
  3. Identify available community resources for the post discharge patient.
  4. Identify appropriate care settings for the post discharge patient.
  5. Apply skills for inter-professional team collaboration and care coordination in the management of a discharged patient.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Blackboard Software for the web-based activities.

 

 

The transfer of patient care from the hospital team to providers in the community is a high-risk process characterized by fragmented, non-standardized, haphazard care. The contributory role of provider-related factors to failure in transitions of care is becoming more prevalent as a result of the lack of continuity of care with the emerging role of hospitalists in the care of patients, increasing the need for understanding of the roles of sending and receiving providers in the care transitions process.

 

 

The initial workshop consists of an interactive case-based presentation on the issues that occur at the point of transition, followed by recommended care transitions best practices. The workshop also incorporates hands on activities that simulate a patient’s post-discharge office visit with the participants role playing as the patient’s primary care physician. During this activity, the learners are trained on: structuring of the post discharge visit; identification of patient care needs, along with factors that present a risk for re-hospitalization; and, development of a multidisciplinary care plan to address the needs of the patient. This session is followed by a month-long web-based module that consists of participants’ review of web based study materials, completion of assignments along with online peer-peer and facilitator interaction. During the month, the participants continue to role play as the patient’s primary care physician while collaborating with other members of the healthcare team in caring for the patient. This aspect of the curriculum focuses on educating learners about the role of members of the healthcare team, inter-professional team collaboration and care coordination in the management of the discharged patient. It also highlights the role of the patient and family in the care transitions process, identification of available community resources to meet patient care needs, and appropriate discharge care settings.

The rotation is concluded with a wrap up session at the end of the month where interactive discussions are held to reinforce lessons learnt along with a discussion on appropriate discharge care settings, eligibility criteria and funding sources. The students then get to vote on a choice of an appropriate discharge care setting for their patient.

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Office-Based Inter-Professional Care Transitions Curriculum for Third Year Medical Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Primer of Medical Directorship in the Nursing Home for Geriatric Medicine Fellows

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

We developed this curriculum for first year Geriatric Medicine Fellows to prepare them for the role of nursing home medical director. This curriculum has been integrated into the Department of Geriatric Medicine's Fellowship training program at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. The curriculum should be taught by an AMDA Certified Medical Director. Seven one-hour sessions are delivered over a 3-month period. The curriculum is based on AMDA’s description of the roles and responsibilities of the medical director as outlined in their position statement. These roles and responsibilities are divided into four categories: 1) Physician leadership, 2) Patient Care-Clinical Leadership, 3) Quality of Care, and 4) Education, Information and Communication. Fellows should be guided through this framework in developing strategies to address issues specific to each topic. Throughout these sessions, we ask the fellows to describe examples of cases they have seen during their clinical rotations in the LTC facilities. This leads to richer learning and application during the didactic sessions.

Educational objectives: 

The primary goal of the curriculum is to equip fellows with skills and knowledge that are uniquely applied to the role of medical direction in nursing homes. Specific learning objectives include:

  1. The fellow will be able to describe the roles of the medical director in a LTC facility according to American Medical Directors Association (AMDA)'s position statement
  2. The fellow should be able to apply what they have learned in order to fulfill the responsibilities of the medical director role
  3. The fellow will recognize the value of teamwork as a critical aspect in effective medical direction
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The seminar series should be scheduled in the middle of the first year of the fellowship. Scheduling this curriculum in the middle of the academic year ensures that fellows have sufficient clinical experience, a strong foundation in nursing home care, and an appreciation of the role of LTC facilities within the complex medical care system.

The integration of medical directorship training into a geriatric medicine fellowship program proved to be synergistic. Core concepts were able to be covered efficiently over seven one-hour seminars. The focus on case discussions provided the opportunity to practice application. The seminars complemented and supplemented the clinical aspects of their geriatric medicine fellowship training very well.

Date posted: 
Thu, 06/27/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 06/27/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Primer of Medical Directorship in the Nursing Home for Geriatric Medicine Fellows. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Student-Senior Partnership Program: Curriculum and Facilitator's Guide

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Student-Senior Partnership Program aims to introduce first year medical students to the concepts of patient/doctor relationship, patient-centered communication, health literacy and shared decision-making. Students participate in 4 small group sessions each facilitated by a faculty leader. During these sessions, students observe and engage in patient/physician interactions, practice relationship building with their senior partner and develop lasting relationships with community seniors who in turn introduce students to broad concepts in aging. The program offers an extended track to those students wishing further experience in geriatric patient care.

Date posted: 
Thu, 08/08/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 08/08/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Student-Senior Partnership Program: Curriculum and Facilitator's Guide. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home Flexible Clinical Experience is a weeklong elective rotation for the third year medical student and offers an introduction to the care of the older adult provided at home and along the trajectory of disease from health care maintenance and prevention to end-of-life. Medical students are scheduled for home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. Students also experience a home visit with elder protective services and other members of the inter-professional home care team. In addition, students spend time with a palliative care physician and make home visits with hospice staff. The students receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care and are required to complete independent learning assignments. Students receive feedback from the inter-professional team, nurse practitioners and attending physicians on knowledge and professionalism.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  • Identify the role of interprofessional staff in the care of an elderly patient at home
  • Describe the role of elder protective services in the community
  • Perform and document an assessment of fall risk and safety evaluation in the home
  • Demonstrate medication reconciliation with home medications
  • Explain the roles of palliative care and hospice in caring for frail older adults
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Flexible Clinical Experience Program

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home experience was developed within the framework of the new MS3 Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, first implemented in the current academic year (2012-2013). Students are required to select 4 FCE courses from approximately 80 faculty-designed experiences. These one to two week electives emphasize one-on-one interaction between the student and teacher. The methods employed include working in the inpatient and outpatient settings under supervision of physicians, oral and written case presentations, and education in specialized testing procedures used in the specialty.

The following list of overall program objectives provides course design flexibility while maintaining curricula continuity.

  • Allow for career exploration and or development, and planning for senior study
  • Allow exposure to evolving and cutting-edge branches of medicine, and to the growing importance of coordinated, patient-centered care models
  • Provide an opportunity to work with recognized experts in different fields of medicine and allied sciences
  • Provide exposure to novel concepts or systems of care not normally available within the core clinical experience
  • Allow for student designed innovative experiences within the guidelines for this elective

FCE Educational Methodologies & Student Assessment (background)

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home FCE provides the third year medical student the opportunity to experience care provided by multiple team members. Students are scheduled to participate in home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. They also are scheduled to go on home visits with additional members of the inter-professional team, such as physical therapy or a visiting nurse. The FCE includes time with a palliative care physician and going on home visits with members of the hospice team. In addition, students go on a home visit with elder protective services. Students are given a reading list and independent assignments, including a reflective essay. They receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care. Assessment criteria are based on attendance, case history and presentations, participation in home visits and didactics, feedback from inter-professional team and attending physicians on competence, knowledge, and professionalism.

***********

Included Documents

Course Description

The course description is formatted as a Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) course handout for students to download for their portfolios. All FCEs include supervisor (preceptor), sponsoring department, description of activities, learning objectives, assessment and evaluation methods, and offered dates.

Independent Learning Assignments

The assignments list is the self-directed component for the experience.

SAMPLE Schedule

The student schedule is dependent on the resources (professionals and facilities) that are available during particular terms through the academic year. An actual schedule for one student, this sample demonstrates the variety of exposures for the student.

 

Date posted: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Alliance for Geriatric Education in Specialties Curriculum

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Alliance for Geriatrics Education in Specialties (AGES) consists of 8 interactive core curriculum modules: iatrogenic injury, delirium, dementia, polypharmacy, transitions of care, basics of geriatrics assessment and levels of care, physiology of aging, palliative care communication and medications. These 8 modules have been designed to teach specialty faculty, at all levels of their career, how to increase effectiveness and quality of care for their older adult patients. In 2009, the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill conducted a needs assessment to evaluate the potential for improvement of UNC Healthcare System specialty/subspecialty faculty regarding geriatrics care through training. Based on the assessment results, the AGES curriculum was developed, implemented, evaluated, and now available for use through POGOe. The AGES curriculum can be taught as an entire course or each module can be taught as a separate training session. The UNC Healthcare System is currently using all 8 modules for training its non-geriatrician specialty faculty. Each of the 8 module PowerPoint presentations will take approximately 60 minutes per training session. *This curriculum may also be applicable to internists and family medicine practitioners.

Educational objectives: 

Objectives by Module

Module 1:    The Physiology of Aging

•          Learners will be able to describe the normal changes that occur with aging

•          Learners will be able to identify the common age-related changes that occur in the following systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, hematology/immune, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurologic, musculoskeletal, and reproductive

 

Module 2:    Dementia

•          Learners will be able to define dementia

•          Learners will be able to name risk factors/causes for dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss why delirium and depression are predictors/red flags for dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss assessment tools/strategies for identifying dementia

•          Learners will be able to name at least 5 types of dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss the treatment options for dementia

 

Module 3:    Delirium

•          Learners will be able to define delirium and describe its cardinal features and underlying pathophysiology

•          Learners will be able to recognize that delirium is common, under-diagnosed, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality

•          Learners will be able to, regarding delirium, identify ways to: 

»      prevent

»      diagnose

»      evaluate

»      manage

•          Learners will be able to teach key concepts in < 1 minute

•          Learners will be able to define delirium and describe its cardinal features and underlying pathophysiology

 

Module 4:    Transitions of Care

•          Learners will be able to define transitional care

•          Learners will be able to identify barriers to providing improved transitional care to patients

 

Module 5:    Basics of Geriatric Assessment & Levels of Care

•          Learners will be able to illustrate the importance of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial assessments for older adults

•          Learners will be able to describe Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs)

•          Learners will be able to demonstrate gait assessment and falls risk assessment with an older adult

•          Learners will be able to demonstrate cognitive and depression screening with an older adult

 

Module 6:    Iatrogenic Injury

•          Learners will be able to list the most common types of iatrogenic injuries

•          Learners will be able to identify the most common cause of nosocomial fever in the hospital

•          Learners will be able to identify the reasons for use of restraints and how to avoid using them

•          Learners will be able to list the appropriate use of urinary catheters

 

Module 7:    Palliative Care Communications

•          Learners will be able to address Palliative Care misconceptions: What, Why, Where, Who

•          Learners will be able to review outcomes of Palliative Care

•          Learners will be able to present general communication strategies

•          Learners will be able to discuss pain assessment and management principles for older adults

 

Module 8:    Polypharmacy

•          Learners will be able to identify risk factors for Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) in older adults

•          Learners will be able to identify the physiologic changes associated with normal aging that influence pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

•          Learners will be able to recognize ADEs when an older adult presents with a new clinical condition or complaint

•          Learners will be able to avoid potentially harmful medications for older adults

•          Learners will be able to utilize strategies for shortening medication lists and carefully introducing new medications

 

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/29/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/29/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , and . Alliance for Geriatric Education in Specialties Curriculum. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

An Interactive Curriculum on Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This is a 2.5 hour curriculum for medical students in their clerkships on pressure ulcers. The medical students completed an online module to gain basic understanding of pressure ulcers - descriptive techniques and classification. This online module included a knowledge based pre-test. The faculty identified SNF patients with a variety of pressure ulcers - different stages and sites. The faculty conducted clinical rounds on these patients with medical students to practice pressure ulcer description, risk factors, staging and prevention. Subsequently medical students completed a post test to measure their progress towards the objectives. They also completed a program evalution survey.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Identify risk factors for pressure ulcer development
  2. Name the sites at risk for pressure ulcer development
  3. Describe pressure ulcers
  4. Stage pressure ulcers
  5. Enlist pressure ulcer prevention methods
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

20 minutes to complete online module.

Limit bedside rounds to 4 students at a time with faculty members to promote better learning and clear viewing of the pressure ulcers.

This curriculum has been reviewed by geriatrics fellows and faculty at DUMC and visiting faculty participating in the Reynolds Faculty Development program.

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . An Interactive Curriculum on Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Communication Skills Workshop for Medicine Residents During Geriatrics Elective

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Effective communication is essential to health care delivery, especially in care of the elderly, and is associated with increased adherence to treatment and patient satisfaction. This communication skills workshop was created to be integrated in the 4-week Geriatrics block in the first year of Internal Medicine residency training. The workshop consists of 2 small group sessions, ~75 minutes each, requiring a facilitator and 2 or more trainees. Learning format includes didactic learning, discussion, role-play and self-study. Skills taught include Active Listening, Ask-Tell-Ask and SPIKES [Baile WF, et al., Oncologist 2000; 5:302–311]. The product includes a faculty guide and a trainee guide for each of the 2 sessions; a pre-test questionnaire to be completed by trainees prior to session 1, a post-test questionnaire to be completed by trainees after session 2, and a follow-up questionnaire to be completed at 3 months after completion of the curriculum. These questionnaires collect anonymous demographic information about the participants, comfort and confidence in use of communication skills before and after the course, and feedback from the students about the different components of the workshop. There are no right or wrong answers, but information gathered should be used to improve future sessions of the course.

Educational objectives: 

At the end of the 2 sessions of this communication skills workshop, participants will:

  1. Recognize the importance of effective communication in a physician-patient relationship.
  2. Practice specific skills to improve communication in regular and challenging situations, such as Ask-Tell-Ask and SPIKES.
  3. Demonstrate increased comfort and confidence in their communication with older patients.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Session 2 is based on an article describing the SPIKES protocol:
Breaking bad news: the S-P-I-K-E-S strategy. Buckman, RA. Commun Oncol 2005; 2:138–142.

Date posted: 
Thu, 06/21/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 12/01/2020
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Communication Skills Workshop for Medicine Residents During Geriatrics Elective. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Pressure Ulcers and Malnutrition

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Pressure Ulcers and Malnutrition "ACOVE" are numbers 11 and 12 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of this ACOVE, residents will be able to:

  1. Correctly demonstrate how to examine a hospitalized patient for presence of pressure ulcers.
  2. Correctly demonstrate how to evaluate a hospitalized patient for undernutrition.
  3. Correctly assess an undernourished hospitalized patient for reversible causes of poor nutritional intake.
  4. Correctly stage and document a pressure ulcer on hospitalized patient.
Date posted: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 03/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Aging Q3 Pressure Ulcers and Malnutrition. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Pain Management of Older Adult Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake.  A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards.  Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Pain Management "ACOVE" is number 10 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  • Demonstrate proper assessment and management of chronic and persistent pain in patients 65 years and older.
  • Demonstrate assessment of uncontrolled pain, including the proper use of PCA management for pain.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the opioid conversion chart.
  • Identify side effects of opioid therapy.

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 09/30/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 09/30/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Pain Management of Older Adult Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

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