The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Curriculum/Syllabus

An instructional plan of lessons and objectives aimed at helping learners gain a particular set of skills and knowledge. This plan can include a reading list, syllabus, lesson plan or course outline. Sometimes describes the implementation of programs such as chief residency training or student mentor programs.

Geriatric Cardiology OSCE: The Hidden Curriculum, Identifying End Stage Heart Disease & Clarifying Care Goals

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Fellowship Programs must soon comply with the ACGME's Next Accreditation System (NAS) Milestone performance tracking and reporting requirement and consider Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) to measure fellow performance. At the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), geriatricians and cardiologists worked together to create and implement a geriatric cardiology education OSCE for cardiology fellows. Key curriculum content gaps (identifying end stage heart disease, identifying and discussing palliative care goals in cardiac patients), were identified through cardiology fellow and faculty knowledge/performance gaps on a needs assessment survey/pretest. Curriculum content was delivered using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) educational method. Fellows self-assessed their competency level in those EPAs both pre and post OSCE curriculum intervention. The curriculum session included the OSCEs station followed by a debriefing session and learner self-evaluation.

This OSCE station may be given alone or combined in a two station OSCE session, with our other geriatric cardiology OSCE titled, "Geriatric Cardiology OSCE: The Hidden curriculum, Identifying Hypoactive Delirium when Obtaining Procedural Consent."

This resource, also available on MedEDPortal, contains all materials for the geriatric cardiology OSCE regarding end stage heart disease and end of life goal setting, but also contains an additional agenda & timeline and a second evaluation form to be used if the two stations are combined.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Identify end stage cardiac disease in an elderly patient.
  2. Determine the patient’s cognitive and functional capabilities.
  3. Elicit the patient’s goals of care.
  4. Make care recommendations that are consistent with the patient’s life and care goals.

As educators, our goal was to see if the learners were able to recognize that the cardiac disease was at an end stage process, and then follow with an exploration of cognitive, functional and social situations in the context of the patient's goals and wishes to discuss a hospice/palliative care approach. To increase clinical relevance and keep the simulation closer to the reality of clinical care, learners were asked to review the patient's case and discuss plans for his treatment and care. This allows for some learners to make the clinical error of only adjusting medications and suggesting AICD battery replacement if they do not fully assess the patient holistically and delve into their care goals. We believe that this to be a more realistic and powerful way to learn.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This curriculum was successfully implemented in the cardiology fellowship core curriculum but could also be implemented with other levels and types of learners (residents, medical students). Resource limitations may include space and standardized patients.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Published first on MedEDPortal

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/26/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/26/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Cardiology OSCE: The Hidden Curriculum, Identifying End Stage Heart Disease & Clarifying Care Goals. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Can You Swallow This? A Practical Approach to Dysphagia

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This interactive, "hands-on", small group session emphasizes a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of dysphagia in older adults.  Created by a speech and language pathologist and geriatrician team, the session begins with a brief overview of swallowing anatomy and phases.  A small group brainstorming session then highlights potential etiologies of dysphagia, followed by the use of video fluoroscopic studies and the learners' sampling of thickened liquids and trials of swallowing manoeuvers to make learning "stick".

1) The session starts with the facilitator reviewing a PowerPoint presentation (9 slides).  These slides cover the session learning objectives, the definition of dysphagia and review of  health consequences of dysphagia, and orient the learner to swallowing basics through cross-sectional diagrams of the head and neck describing swallowing anatomy and phases of swallowing.

2) The session continues with a small group brainstorming session with learners working in groups of two or three to fill in a chart listing "what conditions/diseases may lead to dysphagia or aspiration?" The group lists the etiologies under the three headings of swallowing phases (e.g., oral, pharyngeal, esophageal).  The facilitator has the groups share findings with the large group, highlighting key points.

3) The facilitator returns to the PowerPoint Presentation, reviewing key factors in identifying dysphagia through history and physical examination (4 slides).  Evaluation through video fluoroscopy is demonstrated through 5 short video clips (e.g. normal swallow, aging swallow, aspiration, thick/thin liquids modifications).

4) Learners try nectar and honey thickened liquids to experience potential therapy/treatment options and to then practice basic compensatory swallowing strategies.

 

Educational objectives: 

Educational Objectives:

1. Identify the 3 phases of swallowing (oral, pharyngeal, esophageal) and conditions causing potential dysphagia.

2. List 5 factors (clues) that a patient may be at risk for aspiration.

3. List treatment options for aspiration (swallowing exercises, position changes, dietary modification).

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Educational Objectives:

1. Identify the 3 phases of swallowing (oral, pharyngeal, esophageal) and conditions causing potential dysphagia

2. LIst 5 factors (clues) that a patient may be at risk for aspiration

3. List treatment options for aspiration (swallowing exercises, position changes, dietary modification)

 

Of Note:

This exercise is designed to cover the practical aspects of swallowing and dysphagia.  It's goal is to help learners identify risk factors for aspiration in older adults and to be able to then implement an initial assessment plan to evaluate the condition further.  Trial of the liquids is done to increase empathy and understanding of the risks and benefits of modifying liquid consistence for patients and the challenges of postural and behavioral modifications as well.  The teacher/facilitator does not need to be an expert in swallowing and dysphagia.  The materials provided are an initial point for teaching and the Frequently Asked Questions/References  (Ask the Speech Therapist Sheet) is designed to supplement the session and to provide a starting place for further study.

While the session is most easily taught as a small group session (6-8 learners), it was taught at the American Geriatrics Society Clinical Skills session to approximately 60 learners.  The small group portions were completed by having learners work with one or two persons next to them to complete the Dysphagia Etiologies Chart, and liquids were passed on trays.

Materials needed for the session:

1. Session Agenda - facilitator (one)

2. Session Agenda - Participants (one for each participant)

3. PowerPoint presentation with included 5 video clips

4. Dysphagia Etiologies sheets - blank (one for each participant or for each small group)

5. Dysphagia Etiologies sheet - answer key (one for the facilitator)

6. Nectar and honey consistency thickened liquids.  These may be made with a starch/thickener product such as "Thickit" (mix the starch with water according to ratios in the product directions - be aware that the liquids thicken further upon standing, so you may need to thin the liquid out with more water), or by purchasing pre-thickened liquids in the two consistencies ( a more expensive, but easier approach).  It is a time-saver and stress-reducer to have the liquids prepared in the small cups prior to the session.  They may be place on the table or passed around via a tray.  It is important to identify which liquid (nectar or honey thickened) is in which cup.  This may be done with a marker "N" or "H" on the cups, or by simply using two different style/color of cups.

7. Small, disposable cups (2 per learner)

8. Spoons and napkins, tray (optional)

9. Frequently Asked Questions/Reference Sheet

 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Presented at:

Wisconsin Geriatrics Board Review Course and Update, Lake Geneva, WI, Sept, 2013

Wisconsin Family Medicine Winter Refresher Course, Oconomowoc, WI February 2014

 American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Clinical Skills Session, Orlando, FL, May 2014

Date posted: 
Mon, 09/29/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 09/29/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Can You Swallow This? A Practical Approach to Dysphagia. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Care Transitions Curriculum for Medicine Residents.

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The Joint Commission, American Geriatric Society, ACGME and LCME have all identified care transitions as a core element of patient care and a critical component of health professional education. Only 16% of Internal Medicine residency programs have formal discharge curricula. We describe a comprehensive Care Transitions Curriculum (CTC) developed for Internal Medicine Primary Care and Categorical residents. 

The curriculum is delivered in the setting of an interactive case based 90 minute workshop using a multimodal approach that combines didactics with small group discussions and an interactive board game exercise. The curriculum focuses on addressing the core aspects of discharge care including (1) Appropriate Predischarge Assessment, (2)Medication Reconciliation, (3) Provider – Provider Communication, (4) Patient Education, (5) Care Coordination,  (6)Post discharge settings of care.

Evaluations received so far have shown that the curriculum is well received by the residents. 

 

Educational objectives: 
  1. Define transitions in care and the roles patients, providers and the system play in safe transitions.
  2. Describe the care transitions process and identify potential multilevel factors that are contributory to failure in transitions of care.
  3. Describe the effects of unsafe transitions and recognize the key elements of safe transitions.
  4. Identify appropriate discharge locations for patients.
  5. Identify processes of efficient and effective care coordination that will ensure seamless transition of patients to other care settings.
  6. Communicate effectively with accountable care providers at the point of discharge – Interdisciplinary team members, PCP, Home Health team, providers at other health care facilities.
  7. Complete an effective pre-discharge patient education on diagnosis, medications and warning symptoms.
Date posted: 
Fri, 03/07/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 03/07/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Care Transitions Curriculum for Medicine Residents. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

First Think Delirium! An effective way to teach residents and fellows about delirium

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Three twenty-minute standardized patient encounters that are designed for learners of all levels and backgrounds to teach the Confusion Assessment Method and the diagnosis, evaluation, and management of delirium. Standardized cases include the following:

  • Older man with hypoactive delirium after taking Tylenol PM

  • Older woman with delirium in the setting of possible alcohol withdrawal

  • Older woman with terminal cancer presenting with delirium

Each case is designed to require the learner to interact with the patient's family member to obtain information about the acuity of the mental status change. There are no physical exams included but these could be added if desired. Feedback to the learners is provided by faculty facilitators who are geriatricians or specialty faculty who have been trained by geriatricians.

Submission includes standardized patient training materials, facilitator training materials, and PowerPoint materials for a didactic pre- and post-session. Finally, pre- and post-surveys to evaluate the learners and the workshop are included.

Educational objectives: 
  1. To evaluate all older adults for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method Use.
  2. To interview an older adult's family member to obtain baseline health information, including activities of daily living and cognitive status.
  3. To manage delirium without using physical or chemical restraints.
  4. To consider alcohol withdrawal in an older adult presenting with altered mental status.
  5. To discuss goals of care with a patient's family member when the patient lacks capacity.
  6. To consider an adverse medication event as a cause of an older adult's altered mental status.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This workshop may be modified for use by learners from different specialty backgrounds. At our institution, the workshop has been modified for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation learners. In addition to changes in the patient conditions, patient presentation was changed to the Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation service or the Orthopedic Unit, two places were these learners see patients. The SP/CI pairs were re-trained prior to the workshop when changes were made. As a result, our SP/CI pairs received more training than the recommended two hours. We believe two hours is sufficient to train the SP/CI pairs as long as no changes are made between workshops. We highly recommend that the training sessions be led by a clinical content expert and an educator with experience in training standardized patients.

Finally, due to scheduling conflicts, we were unable to use the same actor pair for the same case with each workshop. Each case was portrayed by at least two actors, which highlighted the fact that some actors perform better than others. We highly recommend that the clinical content expert review the actors' portrayal of the cases before the workshop to ensure accuracy.

This workshop also requires training of faculty facilitators. Learners need feedback from faculty facilitators regarding their evaluation and management. Faculty facilitators must undergo a thorough, standardized training in order to function as effective teachers in this workshop setting. Our faculty facilitators, all of whom had already participated in a faculty development retreat on Geriatric Medicine topics, completed a 1 hour training session led by a geriatrician prior to the workshop. Again, we highly recommend that the facilitators undergo training led by a clinical content expert and receive additional information and training as needed depending on their clinical experience and background.

We recommend that the session occur in a clinical skills lab or an environment that simulates a clinical setting.

This entire workshop takes about 2 to 3 hours to complete when the full didactic session, pre- and post- tests, and program evaluation are included.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Waller N, Biese K, Caprio A, Busby-Whitehead J.  “Three Standardized Patient Cases to Teach the Confusion Assessment Method to Diagnose Delirium."  MedEdPORTAL Publications.  Mar 2013.  Available from: www.mededportal.org/publication/9393.

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Hollar D, Waller N, Biese K, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.”  Journal of American Geriatrics Society.  2013, Volume 61, Issue Supplement s1, S43, Abstract A75.  Full text published first online on April 3, 2013.

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Caprio A, Winzelberg G, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.” Journal of American Geriatrics Society.  2012, Volume 60, Issue Supplement s4, S209-S210, Abstract D66.  Full text published first online on April 4, 2012.

Wilson LA, Waller N, Biese K, Roberts E, Busby-Whitehead J. “First Think Delirium!  An effective way to teach residents and fellows about delirium.” Annual Scientific Meeting, American Geriatrics Society, Grapevine, Texas.  May 4, 2013.  (Presentation, Invited). (1.5 hours, 50 attendees).

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Hollar D, Waller N, Biese K, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.”  Annual Scientific Meeting, American Geriatrics Society, Grapevine, Texas.  May 3, 2013. (Poster, Solicited).

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Hollar D, Waller N, Biese K, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.”, Council on Emergency Medicine Residency Directors Academic Assembly 2013. Denver, Colorado. March 7, 2013. (Poster, Solicited).

Wilson LA, Waller N, Adams S, Iwata I, Biese K, Vanderberg E.  “Using Standardized Patients and Collateral Informants in Geriatric Medicine Education.”  The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation 2012 Reynolds Grantee 19th Annual Meeting, St. Louis, Missouri.  October 22, 2012.  (Didactic Oral Presentation/Workshop, Solicited). (1 hour, 10 faculty members).

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Hollar D, Waller N, Biese K, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.” The John A. Hartford Foundation Interdisciplinary Scholars Communications Conference, Chicago, Illinois, July 10, 2012. (Poster, Solicited).

Wilson LA, Roberts E, Caprio A, Winzelberg G, Busby-Whitehead J. “An Innovative Approach to Teaching Delirium Using Standardized Patients.” Annual Scientific Meeting, American Geriatrics Society, Seattle, Washington, May 4, 2012. (Poster, Solicited).

Wilson LA, Caprio A, Roberts E“Training Subspecialty Faculty With Simulated Patients: Teaching General Skill Sets to Faculty.”  Gerolina, Kiawah Island, SC.  December 2, 2011. (Didactic Oral Presentation/Workshop, Solicited). (1 hour, 12 faculty members).

Date posted: 
Tue, 07/02/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 09/20/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . First Think Delirium! An effective way to teach residents and fellows about delirium. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Hearing Loss and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Hearing Loss and Aging "ACOVE" is number 16 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  • Perform an Otoscopic exam to identify treatable causes of hearing loss.
  • Identify causes of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss.
  • Treat immediately reversible causes of hearing loss.
  • Be familiar with auditory assistance devices for those who can't be helped by ENT or can't afford hearing aids.

 

Date posted: 
Thu, 08/07/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 08/07/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Hearing Loss and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Urinary Incontinence and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Urinary Incontinence and Aging "ACOVE" is number 15 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 
  • Understand the characteristics of primary types of incontinence
  • Demonstrate an initial workup/management of incontinence
  • Understand the importance of removing foley catheters
  • Define valid indications for inpatient foley catheters
Date posted: 
Wed, 07/16/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 07/16/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Urinary Incontinence and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Depression and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. In the clinic, Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. A "Yellow Sheet" cues the Resident to address the featured issue on the hospital wards. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

The Depression and Aging "ACOVE" is number 14 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3.

Educational objectives: 

Understand the epidemiology of late-life depression

Recognize the risk factors for depression in older adults

Recognize medications adversely associated with depression

Perform an initial screening for depression using the PHQ-9

Describe treatment options of non-psychotic major depressive disorder in older adults

 

 

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/14/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/14/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Aging Q3 Curriculum on Depression and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Aging Q3 Curriculum on Osteoarthritis and Aging

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Using the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (or ACOVE) paradigm and the principles of Academic Detailing, Aging Q3 is developing curricula on 16 different topics for teaching residents about providing quality care to elderly patients. Aging Q3 uses a sequence of multiple interventions where residents learn and experience the practice of Geriatrics in the clinical setting with limited interruption to the process of patient care. Each ACOVE is featured for 3 months. The curriculum includes a resident lecture during one of the residents' scheduled noon conferences, a handout used by the faculty to detail the resident on the issue during precepting or rounds, a poster which is displayed strategically in resident areas of the hospital and clinic, and observed demonstration and assessment of a defined skill. Residents are "cued" to address the featured issue with their elder patients by a "Blue Sheet" which contains a few brief questions on the ACOVE topic that the Patient Care Technician or Nurse have discussed with the patient during intake. Residents are assessed pre and post on knowledge, skill, and attitude by a Survey Monkey questionnaire.

Osteoarthritis "ACOVE" is number 13 of 16 different curricula being developed in Aging Q3

Educational objectives: 

Define Osteoarthritis and the scope of the problem

Review potential causes and associated symptoms of Osteoarthritis

Review diagnostic criteria, treatment options, and interventions

Date posted: 
Fri, 09/20/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 09/20/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Aging Q3 Curriculum on Osteoarthritis and Aging. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Curriculum development for Geriatric Medicine Fellows PACE ( Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) rotation.

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This curriculum design serves as a tool to guide educators, involved in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly) or similar models of care, to develop a structured learning environment. The learners (fellows, residents or medical students) will benefit from reviewing the curriculum and gaining a better understanding of expectations at PACE and similar models of care.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion, the educator will be able to: 

1) Develop and implement a structured educational plan to help the geriatric learners gain knowledge, skills and attitude  to provide compassionate, integrated care to community dwelling frail older adults while working with an interdisciplinary team in the PACE setting. 

2) Develop an active learning environment for geriatric learners in the PACE setting to help them achieve a significant learning experience. 

3) Utilize this curriculum design as a springboard for educational strategies in settings outside PACE to integrate various learning strategies with assessment methods in order to achieve the desired goals and objectives. 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly) provides a very unique learning environment for Geriatric Medicine Fellows and other learners with an interest in Geriatrics. Learners are exposed to a population of frail, nursing home eligible older adults that continue to dwell in the community with the support of an integrated medico-social model of care. Learners can gain valuable insight on the functioning of a highly effective interdisciplinary team and learn about PACE and similar models of care.

Geriatric Medicine fellows at Virginia Commonwealth University currently spend one month at the PACE site in Richmond, Virginia. A new PACE curriculum was designed with the overarching goal of creating a significant learning experience. The first step was a general Needs Assessment with analysis of the difference between the current approach and an ideal approach. This was followed by a targeted Needs Assessment of the current and past learners as well as their learning environment.  Goals and objectives were then developed, and feedback and assessment methods were determined for each objective. The learning strategies were then assigned to each objective to develop an integrated course design.

Date posted: 
Thu, 09/05/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/05/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Curriculum development for Geriatric Medicine Fellows PACE ( Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) rotation. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

Medical Student Curriculum: Cognitive & Behavioral Disorders Domain

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The curriculum module was developed for faculty use in teaching medical students the fundamental knowledge and skills required to build competence in the AAMC Cognitive and Behavioral Disorders Domain. The module can be offered as a stand-alone unit or as part of a course. The formal content is taught in the context of clinical scenarios and includes a range of instructional strategies to reinforce learning and skill acquisition.

Standardized patients have also been developed for this domain; they are available on POGOe, as well (Items 21301 and 21302).

Educational objectives: 

The module includes instruction that is designed to build student knowledge and skill in each of the five cognitive and behavior disorders domain competencies. The specific learning objectives are to:

  1. Distinguish normal and abnormal physiologic changes in the aging brain
  2. Utilize a systematic approach to assessing a patient presenting with memory loss
  3. Distinguish between the unique clinical signs and symptoms of dementia, delirium and depression
  4. Describe the etiology, diagnosis and management of dementia, delirium and depression
  5. Administer four common cognitive and affective assessment instruments (MMSE, Clock Draw, Sweet 16, Geriatric Depression Scale) and interpret the results
  6. Recommend appropriate pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for a patient presenting with dementia, delirium or depression
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Overbeck KJ.  “Innovative Competency-based Curricular Models for Undergraduate Osteopathic Medical Education – Competency-based MS II Geriatrics Block Module,” presented at the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) 2011 Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD, April 2011.

Date posted: 
Tue, 07/15/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 07/15/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Medical Student Curriculum: Cognitive & Behavioral Disorders Domain. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/287

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