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Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Introduction: Frailty is a diagnosable and treatable medical condition. It is a common syndrome in older adults, characterized by: physiological decline, marked vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, increased healthcare utilization, disability, high risk of falls, multiple comorbidities, and mortality. Our goal was to create a case-based educational resource in frailty for medical and other healthcare students.

Methods: A multidisciplinary team at the Miami VAHS, Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, designed and implemented an 8-module educational resource on frailty: An Introduction and 7 cases covering screening, diagnosis, management, and comorbidities. This curriculum was used and evaluated by 4th-year medical students from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Evaluation included a pre-/post-test and a curriculum evaluation with questions on content, learning objectives, value of the learning, and multimedia module usability. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used with unilateral Monte Carlo significance to compare pre-/post-test performance, significant at p<.05.

Results: Fifty-one students completed 4 modules and the pre-/post-test from November 2020 to March 2021. Students’ post-test performance demonstrated significant improvement (p<.05) in knowledge of frailty. Fifty-five percent agreed the multimedia educational activity enhanced their knowledge of frailty and will include frailty assessment in their future practices. The combined “Good + Excellent” rating from evaluations of content linked to learning objectives ranged from 82.3-94.2%. Overall, written comments were positive regarding multimedia usability.

Conclusion: These case-based modules on frailty were highly rated and positively critiqued by students. Pre-/post-test evaluations demonstrated an increase in knowledge of frailty.

Keywords

Frailty, sarcopenia, comorbidities, multimedia, case-based learning

Educational objectives: 

There are twelve (12) learning objectives for the seven (7) cases; two learning objectives repeat for multiple cases. The number(s) in parentheses at the end of each learning objective below designates the cases in which the learning objective applies. All learning objectives start with the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe.”

  1. Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools (1)
  2. Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions (1)
  3. Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional (2 through 7)
  4. Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination (2)
  5. As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team (2, 3, 6, 7)
  6. Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains (3)
  7. Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care (4)
  8. Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases (5)
  9. Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions (5)
  10. Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function (6)
  11. The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis (7)
  12. The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer (7)
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

 

Facilitator’s Guide

Understanding Frailty: Screening, Diagnosis and Management

Authors

Lubna A. Nasr, MD

Department of Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Bruce W. Carter Miami VAMC, Miami, FL, USA

Raquel Aparicio-Ugarriza, PhD

ImFINE Research Group. Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science-INEF

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Douglas Salguero, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA.

Michael J. Mintzer, MD, AGSF

Director and Associate Director for Education & Evaluation

Miami Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Miami, FL, USA

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank:

Rose van Zuilen, PhD, and Corinne B. Ferrari for their help in reviewing the modules and including this frailty training as a component of the MS4 geriatrics clerkship

 

Overview

Frailty is a term widely used in clinical medicine but often ill-defined. The primary purpose of these modules is to teach learners the definition, screening modalities and diagnostic methods for frailty. In addition, the secondary purpose to is display healthcare issues of older adults commonly associated with frailty. These include comorbid conditions, social disruptions, end-of-life care, etc.

This training is composed of eight PowerPoint narrated and animated presentations. PowerPoint was chosen because of its ubiquitous availability to virtually all learners. The introduction presents the basics of frailty definition, screening and diagnosis. The subsequent seven case-based modules ask students to apply their knowledge. We recommend that learners complete a minimum of four modules starting with the introduction and ending with Case 7; learners are free to choose two modules from cases 1 through 6 and are welcome to complete all these optional cases. Finally, case 7 is the most complicated and longest module; if a learner uses the fully narrated and animated features, it will run approximately 25-minutes. To meet individual needs, learners have the option to disable audio (narration and dialog) on some or all of the screens. (These PowerPoint-based modules do not provide the option of varying the speed of audio tracks as in some programs). Most students can complete the minimum of 4 modules in 60-75 minutes; all the modules can be completed in 2-2.5 hours. The list of module titles is included in Learning Objectives below.

All cases use a standardized template. Navigation instructions are included in the Introduction; all cases follow the same instructions. Learners must start with the Introduction followed by cases in numerical sequence; cases become more complex with progression. In evaluating this curriculum, we used: Introduction, followed by Case 1, Case 5 and Case 7. Students can return to the Introduction module at anytime to review terms and definitions.

Materials and Supplies

Access to a computer with Microsoft PowerPoint or other compatible software is required. Headphones or earbuds may be needed if learning is occurring in a congregate environment or because of learner preference. This training requires no other special instructions, materials or supplies. The PowerPoint presentations can be easily uploaded to the school’s learning management system for assignment to learners.

Learning Objectives

Learning objectives are included in each case. These objectives also act as a “preview” for the content within the animated and interactive modules. The introduction has no learning objectives because it is a “definition of terms” module for frailty, sarcopenia, and frailty screening, diagnosis and management. These topics are specifically addressed within the learning objectives of the cases. There are 12 unique learning objectives. Some of the learning objectives appear in more than one case. This is intentional. It allows learners to apply their learning to a new clinical circumstance or a new domain of care. The learning objectives follow the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe:” and are listed here by case:

Case 1: Mild Frailty

  • Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools
  • Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise, nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions

Case 2: Moderate Frailty and Falling

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 3: Frailty and Cognitive Symptoms

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 4: Severe Frailty, Dependency and Palliative Care

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care

Case 5: Frailty and Depression

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases
  • Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions

Case 6: Frailty and Major Neurocognitive Disorder

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 7: Frailty and Cancer

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis
  • The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Evaluation

During this curriculum evaluation, we used identical pre- and post-tests, containing seven questions with twenty correct answers, to measure learning. This pre-/post-test is available upon request. All questions were effective in discriminating an increase in learning. Learner comments on content, presentation and usability of the modules were overwhelmingly positive.

Use of These Modules

These modules are free for use for all teachers, instructors and trainers. They can be used as produced and be incorporated into an existing curriculum, in part or in full. When these frailty modules are used or included in another curriculum, questions from the pre-/post-test may be adapted for assessments of students’ learning. As with all student assessments, these questions would likely require revision after several years of use. If adapted versions of this curriculum, or parts of this curriculum, are published, attribution to original authors must be included and these new materials must be equally accessible to teachers, instructors and trainers as are the original materials. These materials may not be used or adapted for commercial purposes. (See Creative Commons criteria: CC BY-NC-SA [Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike]).

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/11/2021
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 06/09/2021
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2021 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Sexual Health in Older Adults, Part 2, Common Concerns, Chronic Diseases, and Sexually Transmitted Infections

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Sexual Health in Older Adults, part 2,  is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Define widower syndrome
  2. Regularly ask older adults about sexual performance concerns
  3. Consider that sexually transmitted infections can occur in older adults and test for them when indicated
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the University of Arizona Center on Aging" 
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415.

Also available online.

Date posted: 
Mon, 09/14/2020
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 09/14/2020
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Sexual Health in Older Adults, Part 2, Common Concerns, Chronic Diseases, and Sexually Transmitted Infections. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2020 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Sexual Health: Tips for Taking a Geriatric Sexual History

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Sexual Health: Tips for Taking a Geriatric Sexual History is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 
  1. State the percentage of older adult who are sexually active
  2. Identify common problems in older adults that can interfere with sexual activity
  3. Use one of the standard question models to take a sexual history
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Fri, 11/15/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/14/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Sexual Health: Tips for Taking a Geriatric Sexual History. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Opioids in Older Adults: Initiating Therapy

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Opioids in Older Adults: Initiating Therapy is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Explain the potential benefits and risks of opioid therapy in older adults
  2. Properly evaluate a patient for opioid prescription, include goals or care and reasons not to prescribe opioids
  3. Recommend other approach to pain treatment, and adjunctive approaches to pain treatment, when considering opioid therapy for older adults
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Mon, 11/11/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/14/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Opioids in Older Adults: Initiating Therapy. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Religion and End of Life Part 2: Respecting a Patient’s Religious Values Near the End of Life

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Religion and End of Life Part 2: Respecting a Patient’s Religious Values Near the End of Life is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Appropriately greet family members coming to visit or stay with dying patients’
  2. Facilitate timely completion of death certificates, particularly for patients whose religions dictate burial soon after death
  3. Avoid prescribing medications
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 07/16/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Religion and End of Life Part 2: Respecting a Patient’s Religious Values Near the End of Life. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Religion and End of Life Part 1: How Different Religions View the End of Life

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Religion and End of Life Part 1: How Different Religions View the End of Life is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. State the basic approaches for how a patient’s body should be handled near and after death for patients of different religions
  2. Discuss those approaches, with families of patients who are dying
  3. Consult hospital clergy when uncertain about death rituals for a particular patient’s religion.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 07/16/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Religion and End of Life Part 1: How Different Religions View the End of Life. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. List the common causes of urinary catheter blockage
  2. Evaluate patients with a blocked catheter to determine the cause
  3. Take steps to manage and eliminate catheter blockage
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 06/25/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Chronic Urinary Catheters - Troubleshooting Blockage. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Ageism

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

ELDER CARE A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Ageism is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Explain what ageism is
  2. Explain how ageism can negative influence social and health outcomes for older adults
  3. Explain ways that clinicians can reduce their own feelings and actions that promote ageism
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and

The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 06/25/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Ageism. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Decreasing Polypharmacy: The Art of Deprescribing

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Decreasing Polypharmacy: The Art of Deprescribing is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Identify the drugs most likely to cause adverse drug effects in older adults
  2. Explain how to use the depresciribing protocol
  3. Describe a typical tapering protocol for drugs that might have withdrawal symptoms
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Fri, 07/19/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 04/29/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Decreasing Polypharmacy: The Art of Deprescribing. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Recognizing Dehydration in Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Recognizing Dehydration in Older Adults is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Identify key risk factors for dehydration in older adults
  2. Identify ways to diagnose dehydration in older adults
  3. Make appropriate recommendations about fluid intake in older adults
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as:

  1. Content is not changed,
  2. No one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. Authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. The reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program”.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Nelson, D. and Medina-Walpole, A. (2010, December), Elder care provider fact sheets. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(12), 2414-2415. Also available online.

Date posted: 
Wed, 07/17/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 04/29/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Recognizing Dehydration in Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/249

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