The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Preventive Medicine

Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Introduction: Frailty is a diagnosable and treatable medical condition. It is a common syndrome in older adults, characterized by: physiological decline, marked vulnerability to adverse health outcomes, increased healthcare utilization, disability, high risk of falls, multiple comorbidities, and mortality. Our goal was to create a case-based educational resource in frailty for medical and other healthcare students.

Methods: A multidisciplinary team at the Miami VAHS, Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical Center, designed and implemented an 8-module educational resource on frailty: An Introduction and 7 cases covering screening, diagnosis, management, and comorbidities. This curriculum was used and evaluated by 4th-year medical students from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Evaluation included a pre-/post-test and a curriculum evaluation with questions on content, learning objectives, value of the learning, and multimedia module usability. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used with unilateral Monte Carlo significance to compare pre-/post-test performance, significant at p<.05.

Results: Fifty-one students completed 4 modules and the pre-/post-test from November 2020 to March 2021. Students’ post-test performance demonstrated significant improvement (p<.05) in knowledge of frailty. Fifty-five percent agreed the multimedia educational activity enhanced their knowledge of frailty and will include frailty assessment in their future practices. The combined “Good + Excellent” rating from evaluations of content linked to learning objectives ranged from 82.3-94.2%. Overall, written comments were positive regarding multimedia usability.

Conclusion: These case-based modules on frailty were highly rated and positively critiqued by students. Pre-/post-test evaluations demonstrated an increase in knowledge of frailty.

Keywords

Frailty, sarcopenia, comorbidities, multimedia, case-based learning

Educational objectives: 

There are twelve (12) learning objectives for the seven (7) cases; two learning objectives repeat for multiple cases. The number(s) in parentheses at the end of each learning objective below designates the cases in which the learning objective applies. All learning objectives start with the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe.”

  1. Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools (1)
  2. Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions (1)
  3. Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional (2 through 7)
  4. Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination (2)
  5. As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team (2, 3, 6, 7)
  6. Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains (3)
  7. Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care (4)
  8. Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases (5)
  9. Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions (5)
  10. Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function (6)
  11. The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis (7)
  12. The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer (7)
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

 

Facilitator’s Guide

Understanding Frailty: Screening, Diagnosis and Management

Authors

Lubna A. Nasr, MD

Department of Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

Bruce W. Carter Miami VAMC, Miami, FL, USA

Raquel Aparicio-Ugarriza, PhD

ImFINE Research Group. Faculty of Physical Activity and Sport Science-INEF

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Douglas Salguero, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA.

Michael J. Mintzer, MD, AGSF

Director and Associate Director for Education & Evaluation

Miami Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Miami, FL, USA

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank:

Rose van Zuilen, PhD, and Corinne B. Ferrari for their help in reviewing the modules and including this frailty training as a component of the MS4 geriatrics clerkship

 

Overview

Frailty is a term widely used in clinical medicine but often ill-defined. The primary purpose of these modules is to teach learners the definition, screening modalities and diagnostic methods for frailty. In addition, the secondary purpose to is display healthcare issues of older adults commonly associated with frailty. These include comorbid conditions, social disruptions, end-of-life care, etc.

This training is composed of eight PowerPoint narrated and animated presentations. PowerPoint was chosen because of its ubiquitous availability to virtually all learners. The introduction presents the basics of frailty definition, screening and diagnosis. The subsequent seven case-based modules ask students to apply their knowledge. We recommend that learners complete a minimum of four modules starting with the introduction and ending with Case 7; learners are free to choose two modules from cases 1 through 6 and are welcome to complete all these optional cases. Finally, case 7 is the most complicated and longest module; if a learner uses the fully narrated and animated features, it will run approximately 25-minutes. To meet individual needs, learners have the option to disable audio (narration and dialog) on some or all of the screens. (These PowerPoint-based modules do not provide the option of varying the speed of audio tracks as in some programs). Most students can complete the minimum of 4 modules in 60-75 minutes; all the modules can be completed in 2-2.5 hours. The list of module titles is included in Learning Objectives below.

All cases use a standardized template. Navigation instructions are included in the Introduction; all cases follow the same instructions. Learners must start with the Introduction followed by cases in numerical sequence; cases become more complex with progression. In evaluating this curriculum, we used: Introduction, followed by Case 1, Case 5 and Case 7. Students can return to the Introduction module at anytime to review terms and definitions.

Materials and Supplies

Access to a computer with Microsoft PowerPoint or other compatible software is required. Headphones or earbuds may be needed if learning is occurring in a congregate environment or because of learner preference. This training requires no other special instructions, materials or supplies. The PowerPoint presentations can be easily uploaded to the school’s learning management system for assignment to learners.

Learning Objectives

Learning objectives are included in each case. These objectives also act as a “preview” for the content within the animated and interactive modules. The introduction has no learning objectives because it is a “definition of terms” module for frailty, sarcopenia, and frailty screening, diagnosis and management. These topics are specifically addressed within the learning objectives of the cases. There are 12 unique learning objectives. Some of the learning objectives appear in more than one case. This is intentional. It allows learners to apply their learning to a new clinical circumstance or a new domain of care. The learning objectives follow the statement, “After viewing this module, learners will be able to describe:” and are listed here by case:

Case 1: Mild Frailty

  • Frailty can be diagnosed using accepted criteria and available tools
  • Frailty can be managed with literature-based interventions that include exercise, nutritional support and optimized treatment of comorbid conditions

Case 2: Moderate Frailty and Falling

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with a reduction in socialization that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains as well as care coordination
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 3: Frailty and Cognitive Symptoms

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with cognitive deterioration that is often remediable with optimized care across all domains
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 4: Severe Frailty, Dependency and Palliative Care

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with dependency and the need to recommend palliative care

Case 5: Frailty and Depression

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty is often associated with depression because both are common diseases
  • Depression can affect frailty by amplifying the symptoms of co-morbid conditions

Case 6: Frailty and Major Neurocognitive Disorder

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • Frailty coexisting with cognitive impairment need to be recognized early because of their mutual deleterious impact on function
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Case 7: Frailty and Cancer

  • Frailty is a multifactorial illness with contributions from many domains of well-being: medical, psychological, social and functional
  • The need to customized cancer care in frail patients based on comorbidities, function and prognosis
  • The importance of the social domain in care planning for patients with frailty and cancer
  • As is often the case in caring for patients with complex disease, it takes a team

Evaluation

During this curriculum evaluation, we used identical pre- and post-tests, containing seven questions with twenty correct answers, to measure learning. This pre-/post-test is available upon request. All questions were effective in discriminating an increase in learning. Learner comments on content, presentation and usability of the modules were overwhelmingly positive.

Use of These Modules

These modules are free for use for all teachers, instructors and trainers. They can be used as produced and be incorporated into an existing curriculum, in part or in full. When these frailty modules are used or included in another curriculum, questions from the pre-/post-test may be adapted for assessments of students’ learning. As with all student assessments, these questions would likely require revision after several years of use. If adapted versions of this curriculum, or parts of this curriculum, are published, attribution to original authors must be included and these new materials must be equally accessible to teachers, instructors and trainers as are the original materials. These materials may not be used or adapted for commercial purposes. (See Creative Commons criteria: CC BY-NC-SA [Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike]).

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/11/2021
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 06/09/2021
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Frailty Interactive Cases and A Facilitator’s Guide. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2021 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Aging and Immunity: The Important Role of Vaccines

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Immune function wanes in all adults—whether healthy or sick—as they age into their fifth decade and beyond. Their bodies become less adept at recognizing and stopping pathogens, and the ability to develop and maintain immunity declines. Also known as  immunosenescence, age-related decline in immunity significantly contributes to the susceptibility of older adults to serious conditions, including influenza, pneumonia, and shingles.

Patients often believe that by living a healthy lifestyle, they can avoid illness and disease. While exercising, getting recommended screenings, and eating right are important for staying healthy, they alone do not prevent older adults from acquiring vaccine-preventable diseases. For older adults who feel, and generally are, healthy, it can be difficult to recognize that immunosenescence is occurring or what impact it may have. Underappreciation for immunosenescence could at least partially explain why adult vaccines remain significantly underutilized, despite their ability to stimulate and heighten immune response and boost waning immunity in older adults. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, in 2015, only 57% of Americans aged 65 years or older received a tetanus vaccine in the prior 10 years, 64% had received a pneumococcal vaccine, and only 34% had ever received a herpes zoster vaccine. Among adults 50 years and
older, four vaccine-preventable diseases alone—influenza, herpes zoster, pneumococcal disease, and pertussis—cost the United States more than $26 billion annually.

Ensuring that adult patients receive recommended vaccines is an important way to prevent unnecessary infections and reduce health care costs. Health care professionals play a key role in this process, specifically, they should:

  • Assess their adult patient’s immunization status
  • Strongly recommend vaccination at every opportunity using the 4R approach: Recommend, Repeat, Remind, Review
  • Have a program that supports in-practice vaccine administration
  • Refer patients to a health care professional who administers vaccines if you do not
  • Document vaccine administration and submit to the immunization registry

Vaccination is a critical component of protecting the health of individuals as they age. Providing a strong recommendation for vaccination at each encounter increases the likelihood of an individual accepting a vaccine, reducing the risk for debilitating illness, and protecting quality of life.

Educational objectives: 
  • Provide healthcare professionals with an understanding of the biological impact of aging on immunity,
  • Provide information to support the value of vaccination by exploring herpes zoster in depth and the role that age-related decline in immunity plays in this vaccine-preventable illness,
  • Offer practical tips and strategies for supporting aging patients’ health and overcoming barriers that may contribute to low rates of adult vaccination.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
Date posted: 
Mon, 08/06/2018
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 07/19/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Aging and Immunity: The Important Role of Vaccines. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2018 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education - Interprofessional Team-Based Training, Assignments & Grading

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

The Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education (SAGE) program consists of an educational curriculum and community based outreach program aimed at increasing student opportunities for early exposure to older adults and issues of geriatrics. The program strives to create meaningful relationships for the interprofessional teams of students while gaining knowledge about today’s senior population and their needs. The educational component involves health care profession students interacting with each other and their senior mentor through structured assignments delivered in the home environment.

Student teams are paired in groups of 3-4 healthcare profession students. The student teams are then matched with a community-dwelling senior who receives services from Meals on Wheels or a senior volunteer from the local community. The program includes 6 visits over a 2 year period providing students an opportunity to apply their classroom education in the context and care of an older adult. Students practice and demonstrate basic clinical skills; including taking histories, interviewing, conducting examinations and cognitive assessments, and advising clients on nutrition, home safety, community resources and advance care planning.     

Educational objectives: 
  • Health professions students will develop competency with older adults;
  • Strengthen health care students clinical applications of medical education through an Interprofessional team experience in the SAGE Program;
  • Health professions students learn from each other and appreciate each others professions.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

SAGE Presentations

Marquez-Hall, S. (2015). Interprofessional practice: Seniors assisting in geriatric education. A round table presentation at the Interprofessional Practice Symposium, University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, TX.

Marquez-Hall, S. Lane, Y. (2014) seniors assisting in geriatric education (SAGE): Reynolds program address the lack of training in geriatrics and provides a model for interprofessional education. Jefferson Center for Interprofessional Education Annual Conference, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA.

SAGE Poster Presentations:

Marquez-Hall, S., Pitts-Lane, Y. Knebl, J., (2015). Seniors assisting in geriatric education (SAGE): Reynolds program addresses the lack of training in geriatrics and provides a model for interprofessional education. Poster presentation at Research Appreciation Day, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX.

Marquez-Hall, S., Lane, Y., Smith, R. (2014) Survey of medical students in a geriatric training program. Poster presentation at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Baltimore, MD.

SAGE Awards:

2013 Mae Cora Peterson Senior Spirit Award in recognition of the Seniors Assisting in Geriatrics Education (SAGE) Program, Senior Citizens of Tarrant County, Texas.

2011 AACOM Excellence in Communications Award. Second Place - Best Community Service Program-Serving Fewer Than 1,000. SAGE Program; University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine.  

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/13/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/13/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Seniors Assisting in Geriatric Education - Interprofessional Team-Based Training, Assignments & Grading. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Interdisciplinary Health Profession Module Videos

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Care teams often don't know how to effectively and efficiently collaborate when addressing a patient’s health. Depending on a patient’s needs, team leadership can shift at any given moment from one person to another. Because of this constant jockeying and adaptation, educating learners about their own interprofessional relationships is becoming incredibly important. These videos and the corresponding text supplements provide a context for interprofessional team members to discover more about what it takes to become a member of another profession. This knowledge, combined with their own experiences and clinical practice, will assist in preparing learners for the next-generation of team-based healthcare.

Educational objectives: 

After watching these short 2-3 minute videos, interprofessional teams will be able to contextualize their own relationship within the group dynamic, understand the educational requirements that go into other disciplines, and formulate an effective team-based learning approach for future activities.

Date posted: 
Tue, 09/27/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 09/27/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interdisciplinary Health Profession Module Videos. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

VirginiaGeriatrics.Org

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The VirginiaGeriatrics.Org website consists of 6 primary resources and a secondary list of resources for further research. These primary resources include a video archive of the geriatric grand round lecture series, interactive pre-clinical basic science geriatric case studies for medical students, more advanced geriatric case studies for clinical residents, a quick consult guide for geriatric consults, an "ask the expert" discussion resource, and various educational materials related to the Virginia Geriatrics Society Conference. Additionally, spread through the website are external educational resources to complement the core material. Finally, there are some resources for patients and families that may be interested in contacting clinics and/or geriatricians.

Educational objectives: 

Listed through 6 primary education sections (Grand Rounds, Med Student Materials, Resident Materials, Quick Consults, Ask the Expert, etc)

Date posted: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/22/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
VirginiaGeriatrics.Org. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Fall Risk Education & Assessment

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Each year, one in every three adults ages 65 or older falls and 2 million are treated in emergency departments for fall-related injuries. The risk of falling increases with each decade of life. The long-term consequences of fall injuries, such as hip fractures and traumatic brain injuries (TBI), can impact the health and independence of older adults. However, falls are not necessarily an inevitable part of aging. In fact, many falls can be prevented. All healthcare professionals can take actions to protect older adults.

The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTSHC) Reynolds Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas (IGET-IT) Program has developed a Fall Risk Assessment and Education module as part of the Interprofessional Communication Improvement Modules (ICIM) Elder Safety series. The ICIM Elder Safety modules were created in collaboration with the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) and are supported, in part, by a grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. The goal of the Elder Safety ICIMs is to provide innovative and sustainable programs to improve the ability of physicians to work with other health disciplines in teams to provide better care for geriatric patients. The care of older adults can be very complex and studies have shown that a team approach can be most effective in leading to quality outcomes.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

  • Describe risk factors associated with falls in older adults using a comprehensive fall risk assessment.
  • Identify examination components to assess for fall risk.
  • Describe how neurocognitive features can contribute to the risk of falls.
  • Identify four essential tests to assess neurocognitive features.
  • Describe how sensory factors impact the risk of falls.
  • Identify exams to assess sensory factors.
  • Identify the prescription, nonprescription, nutritional supplements, and food/drug interactions that are most frequently associated with an increased fall risk.
  • Discuss polypharmacy and its impact on fall risk.
  • Examine the evidence behind nutritional supplements that may help reduce fractures from falls.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Gimpel, J., & Dowling, D.J. (2014, August). Watch Your Step: An Osteopathic Approach to Patient Fall Prevention and Intervention. Presented at the Pennsylvania Osteopathic Family Physicians Society Annual Convention, Hershey, PA.

Marquez Hall, S. (2016, May). Assessment Tool for Elder Safety on the Topics of Falls Risk and Elder Mistreatment. Presented at American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting Education Product Showcase, Long Beach, CA.

Date posted: 
Wed, 10/05/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 10/05/2016
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Select your activities and add them to your cart. In the cart, click Proceed to Checkout. You will be prompted to create a new account or log in to your existing one. Once your account is created, you will be directed back to complete your registration.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Geriatric Education and Training in Texas: Fall Risk Education & Assessment. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Gait Velocity Assessment Toolkit

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Gait Velocity is a marker of functional and cognitive status in older adults.  Slow gait speed has been associated with poor clinical outcomes such as cognitive decline, falls and hospitalization. This toolkit provides  instructions on how to perform a gait speed or gait velocity assessment.  It includes START and STOP labels, labels for the Timed Zone, and instructions on how to interprete and apply the results.  The examiner will need to measure and mark a walkway, and supply a stopwatch or watch with a second hand. By following these simple steps, gait velocity assessment can become a routine practice for clinicians who care for older adults.

Educational objectives: 

1. Describe how to perform and interpret gait velocity assessment in older adults.

2. Discuss the clinical implications of slow gait speed

Date posted: 
Fri, 10/09/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 04/13/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Gait Velocity Assessment Toolkit. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Geriatric Fast Facts Quizzes

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

Geriatric Fast Facts (GFFs) [www.geriatricfastfacts.com] is a mobile enabled website which contains 1-2 page concise, peer-reviewed evidence-based educational summaries on key geriatrics topics to increase medical knowledge.

GFF Quizzes are quick, online assessment tools paired with GFF content, to be used by learners at the point of care to assess knowledge of geriatric content aligned with ACGME Milestones.  Design elements include quiz content searchable by topic, links to corresponding GFFs, MCQ/ short answer question formats and ability to include images. Learners enter brief demographic information to start (institution, email of self and up to 1 other) allowing annotated score results, displayed immediately after quiz completion, to be sent to themselves and one other individual (faculty, program director). These quick quizzes, available on hand held mobile devices at the point of care, linked to GFF content provide learners and program directors information of learner knowledge assessment linked to ACGME Milestones.

Educational objectives: 

The Geriatric Fast Fact (GFF) quizzes, available on hand held mobile devices at the point of care, linked to GFF content will provide learners and program directors information of learner knowledge assessment linked to ACGME Milestones.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The Geriatric Fast Facts (GFF) and GFF Quizzes may be viewed and accessed by the URL address geriatricfastfacts.com. The site may be then saved to the home screen to allow functionality as an "app".

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Quick Quizzes:  Geriatrics Right in Your Hand & at the Point of Care.  Denson K, Simpson D, Padua K, and the GET Collaboratives at the Medical College of Wisconsin & Aurora Health Care, American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD, 05/2015

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/08/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/08/2015
Product Viewing Instructions: 
The Geriatric Fast Facts (GFF) and GFF Quizzes may be viewed by the URL address geriatricfastfacts.com. The site may be then saved to the home screen to allow functionality as an "app"
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatric Fast Facts Quizzes. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

"TMI"... (Too Many Interpretations): Mr. Moore's Medication Misadventures!

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This two hour interprofessional curriculum brings together fourth year medical students and third year pharmacy students in a hands-on, interactive small group session. Learners are given a guide briefly describing the case and delineating five health care members and their roles and expertise in Mr. Moore's healthcare team (Mr. Moore's partner, the outpatient pharmacist, the inpatient intern, etc). A pair of interprofessional facilitators guide learners through the case, utilizing different healthcare team members' roles and expertise to explore methods of medication organization and systemic barriers to accurate and safe discharge medication reconciliation. Learners discover and discuss discrepancies in high-risk medications, gain an appreciation of systems hurdles for patients and healthcare providers during transitions of care, complete an exercise in writing discharge medication instructions, and brainstorm action items to personally employ to overcome systemic hurdles for safer discharge medication reconciliation.

Educational objectives: 

By the end of the two-hour session, learners will work collaboratively to:

  1. Describe the roles and expertise of three health professions that can collaborate to reconcile medications and enhance safety of medication orders at the time of hospital discharge. 
  2. List three potential communication barriers between health professionals involved in discharge planning that contribute to medication errors in vulnerable older adults.
  3. Identify key components of discharge medication lists and instructions to communicate information safely to patients, caregivers, primary care providers and others on the healthcare team.
Date posted: 
Tue, 08/30/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/30/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
"TMI"... (Too Many Interpretations): Mr. Moore's Medication Misadventures!. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

Interprofessional Grand Rounds

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, together with the Rutgers University School of Nursing, and Rutgers School of Health Related Professions, piloted an interactive, team-based “Interprofessional Grand Rounds” as an instructional strategy to promote interprofessional care plan development and enhance understanding of roles and responsibilities across disciplines.  A total of 235 nursing, physical therapy, respiratory therapy, and medical students collaborated in small groups to problem-solve a complex, multi-faceted case presented with video elements to facilitate gait analysis.  Students answered case study questions using an innovative scratch-off ticket technique.  A team of interdisciplinary faculty facilitated the case-based group discussions. 

Educational objectives: 
  • Explain the importance of effective team communication in a healthcare setting
  • Stimulate team skills in respectful communication and cooperation by creating collaborative interprofessional groups
  • Report increased knowledge of other health care professions and individual confidence in taking an active role as a member of an interprofessional team
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Students were seated in small groups of 5 to 7 students representing different health care professions.  This design created a collaborative atmosphere and allowed open communication among the students from all professions.

  • Chairs in clusters (no tables)
  • Mixture of team members from each health care profession
  • Typical team composition: 3 to 5 Medical Students, 1 Nursing student, 1 to 2  Physical Therapy students, and 1 Respiratory Therapy student
Date posted: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/12/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Grand Rounds. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/227

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