The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Palliative Care

Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 88

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Caring Across the Continuum: An Aging Virtual Patient Series. Case Four: Mrs. Porter Age 88 - Introduction to Palliative Care. This case, the fourth in a four-part series about the virtual patient, Mrs. Porter, introduces the learner to palliative care and hospice concepts and is set in an Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) Unit.  Mrs. Porter has become less mobile, weak and is depressed. She has become more confused and has unintentionally lost 12 pounds since her last visit with Dr. Pat three months ago. Concepts included in this case are conducting a functional and nutritional assessment; setting goals of care; conducting a family conference; discussing Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders; discussing a hospice referral;  and, recognition of the interprofessional practitioners’ contributions to patient care.The case concludes with a home hospice care order for Mrs. Porter. The learner is asked to write a discharge summary for Geriatric Failure to Thrive, taking into account all the details in the case example of Mrs. Porter's family meeting with the interprofessional team.

Educational objectives: 

On completion of Case Four: Mrs. Porter Age 88, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the clinical presentation of malnutrition
  2. Identify common contributing factors of malnutrition in older adults
  3. Define palliative care
  4. Identify at least three characteristics of palliative care
  5. Define general hospice criteria and criteria for failure to thrive/debility
  6. Demonstrate the ability to express the relative risks and benefits of treatment options
  7. Identify the key steps in conducting a family meeting;
  8. Describe strategies for working with families when there is disagreement or indecision
  9. Document a complete summary of the family conference
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product is one part of a short series consisting of the following products:

As an innovative, virtual learning series, this web-based series of cases spans the 21-year relationship of care between geriatrician Dr. Patricia Thompson and her patient, Mrs. Alice Porter. This virtual learning experience for medical students, based on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) competencies, is designed to pique interest and enhance knowledge and skills in the care of older adults. The web-based learning environment provides students the unique opportunity to observe and interact with Mrs. Porter, in an ongoing doctor-patient relationship, outside of the traditional classroom setting. The series exposes students to the importance of continuity of patient care, since each case correlates to a different year of medical school education. As the medical student advances in their curriculum, Mrs. Porter continues to age, requiring more complex care and further application of critical thinking skills from the student. Each case has a unique focus that targets key geriatric and/or palliative concepts appropriate to the level of the student that can easily be embedded into existing medical school courses.

The virtual cases allow students to explore approaches to the patient; observe model clinician-patient interactions; choose practice techniques; offer health promotion, palliative counseling, and patient counseling; and contemplate complex ethical decisions regarding the care of the patient in an innocuous, self-paced, virtual environment. The embedded natural language system in each case offers an opportunity to pose real-world questions and problems to the learner, with the goal of eliciting critical thinking skills and reflective learning.

The series offers a readily available complementary assignment to the classroom and clinical experience. The self-paced case studies contain video animation, an interactive electronic medical record, Geriatric Gems and Palliative Pearls, natural language style critical thinking, clinical reasoning and clinical judgment learning activities, and evidence-based expert explanations. Evaluative tools include a pre and post quiz and rubric-scored natural language short answer and essay questions. The natural language system provides hints to the students and evaluates their responses based on the information they provide. Student actions and choices are captured for formative evaluation, as well as to provide student feedback.

The virtual patient system is a web-based application that runs on Windows Server, running IIS with ASP enabled within IIS. The project database is Microsoft Access.

The first time you explore a case, you will need to register. There is a "Register" button at the bottom of the login form. Click this button to register or to have your password sent to the email address you entered when you registered.

On the popup registration form, you will need to enter an ID and a password. Your ID can be anything you wish. You can use the same User ID and password for any of the four cases. All of the other fields are optional. (The email field is optional. If you don't enter an email address when you register, the system can't send you your password and/or ID if you forget them.)

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Using a Virtual Patient to Teach the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to Medical Students. Poster presented February 24, 2012 at the AGHE Annual Meeting and Educational Leadership Conference.

Instructional Design and Management of a Virtual World: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Project Demonstration presented February 3, 2011 at The University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education Interprofessional Health Science Education Conference.

Design and Management in a Virtual Environment: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Presented October 25, 2010 at the Ninth Annual Reynolds Grantee Meeting.

Date posted: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 88. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home Flexible Clinical Experience is a weeklong elective rotation for the third year medical student and offers an introduction to the care of the older adult provided at home and along the trajectory of disease from health care maintenance and prevention to end-of-life. Medical students are scheduled for home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. Students also experience a home visit with elder protective services and other members of the inter-professional home care team. In addition, students spend time with a palliative care physician and make home visits with hospice staff. The students receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care and are required to complete independent learning assignments. Students receive feedback from the inter-professional team, nurse practitioners and attending physicians on knowledge and professionalism.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  • Identify the role of interprofessional staff in the care of an elderly patient at home
  • Describe the role of elder protective services in the community
  • Perform and document an assessment of fall risk and safety evaluation in the home
  • Demonstrate medication reconciliation with home medications
  • Explain the roles of palliative care and hospice in caring for frail older adults
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Flexible Clinical Experience Program

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home experience was developed within the framework of the new MS3 Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, first implemented in the current academic year (2012-2013). Students are required to select 4 FCE courses from approximately 80 faculty-designed experiences. These one to two week electives emphasize one-on-one interaction between the student and teacher. The methods employed include working in the inpatient and outpatient settings under supervision of physicians, oral and written case presentations, and education in specialized testing procedures used in the specialty.

The following list of overall program objectives provides course design flexibility while maintaining curricula continuity.

  • Allow for career exploration and or development, and planning for senior study
  • Allow exposure to evolving and cutting-edge branches of medicine, and to the growing importance of coordinated, patient-centered care models
  • Provide an opportunity to work with recognized experts in different fields of medicine and allied sciences
  • Provide exposure to novel concepts or systems of care not normally available within the core clinical experience
  • Allow for student designed innovative experiences within the guidelines for this elective

FCE Educational Methodologies & Student Assessment (background)

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home FCE provides the third year medical student the opportunity to experience care provided by multiple team members. Students are scheduled to participate in home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. They also are scheduled to go on home visits with additional members of the inter-professional team, such as physical therapy or a visiting nurse. The FCE includes time with a palliative care physician and going on home visits with members of the hospice team. In addition, students go on a home visit with elder protective services. Students are given a reading list and independent assignments, including a reflective essay. They receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care. Assessment criteria are based on attendance, case history and presentations, participation in home visits and didactics, feedback from inter-professional team and attending physicians on competence, knowledge, and professionalism.

***********

Included Documents

Course Description

The course description is formatted as a Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) course handout for students to download for their portfolios. All FCEs include supervisor (preceptor), sponsoring department, description of activities, learning objectives, assessment and evaluation methods, and offered dates.

Independent Learning Assignments

The assignments list is the self-directed component for the experience.

SAMPLE Schedule

The student schedule is dependent on the resources (professionals and facilities) that are available during particular terms through the academic year. An actual schedule for one student, this sample demonstrates the variety of exposures for the student.

 

Date posted: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Theme-Based Journal

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

These reflective journal activities encourage students to take a holistic approach to assessing their experiences encountered with aging patients. Through the questions posed in each journal activity, students are challenged to reflect on their patient interaction in their clinical rotations with compassion and empathy for the patient experience. The goal is for each student to develop a more patient-centered health care practice. 

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Summarize thoughts, reflections, and experiences as related to the geriatric rotation experience.
  2. Express core geriatric learning principles through reflective and thoughtful writing.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of one’s own perspective when caring for aging patients.  
  4. Demonstrate an awareness of the value of the interprofessional team when caring for aging patients.  
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The journal can be used alone or in combination with the TEXAS Medical Clerkship Program.

The estimated completion time is per journal activity. 

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Theme-Based Journal. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Clinical Teaching Vignette (Preceptor Version)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This clinical vignette is designed to evaluate medical student skills in specific areas of geriatric and palliative medicine. It is separated into four days. Student complete one day of the vignette each day, beginning with Monday and finishing Thursday. Discussion of responses to vignette questions with preceptors is encouraged, and preceptors are asked to review students' answers, provide feedback and sign off on each day's questions. Topics covered include risk factors and prevention of falls in older adults; BEERS Criteria application to a patient case; pain management for an older adult; and, health communication and delivery of bad news to a patient.

 
Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Identify risk factors of falls and describe approaches to reduce falls.
  2. Identify signs and symptoms of delirium and recognize common causes of delirium.
  3. Outline a pain management plan including an initial opioid drug regimen.
  4. Generate a 6-step approach based on SPIKES to use when discussing the bad news.  
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This vignette can be used alone or in combination with the TEXAS Medical Clerkship Program. The estimated completion time is per day of vignette activity.

The vignette was developed by Amy L Holthouser, MD and adapted with premission by Shannon Pearce, DNP, Grace Varas, OD, and Jennifer Larson, MSE

This product was reviewed by UT Health.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Larson, J.A., Young, K., Pearce, S., Varas, G., Ostwald, S., Murphy, K., Holthouser, A., & Dyer, C. (2012, November). Use of a Clinical Vignette to Bridge Experiential Differences on a Geriatric and Palliative Clinical Rotation.  Poster session presented at   The Gerontological Society of America's 65th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Clinical Teaching Vignette (Preceptor Version). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Improving Antipsychotic Appropriateness in Dementia Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This website includes information and resources to help clinicians, providers, and consumers better understand how to manage problem behaviors and psychosis in people with dementia using evidence-based approaches. This includes brief lectures, written content, quick reference guides for clinicians and providers, and information for families or patients on the risks and benefits of antipsychotics for people with dementia (a.k.a. Alzheimer’s disease and others). You can also request laminated quick reference guides to use in your practice, which can help you put the strategies you learn about into action.

Educational objectives: 
On completion, the learner will be able to:
  1. List appropriate initial assessments to help determine the causes of problem behaviors or psychosis in dementia.
  2. Apply non-drug strategies to manage problem behaviors or psychosis in dementia.
  3. Assess delirium signs and symptoms using a delirium screening tool.
  4. Determine when an antipsychotic might be appropriate or inappropriate in a person with dementia, depending on symptoms and the type of dementia.
  5. Select an optimal antipsychotic for a patient with dementia based on efficacy, side effects, and patient comorbidities.
  6. Recognize antipsychotic side effects in a person with dementia.
  7. Discuss the risks and benefits of antipsychotics with patients and families using a shared decision making information sheet as a guide.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This program is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (R18 HS19355-01).

The quick reference guides were reviewed by healthcare practitioners and direct care providers during development. The family guide was reviewed by the New Readers of Iowa and Alzheimer's Association support group participants.

Viewing the videos requires a broadband Internet connection, sound capability, and one of the following supported browsers, with JavaScript enabled:

  • Internet Explorer 7 or later on Windows with Flash version 11.1 or later
  • Chrome 15 or later, Firefox 8 or later, or Opera 10.5 or later on Windows
  • Firefox 8 or later, or Safari 5 or later on Mac OS X
  • iPad 1 or later

Viewing and printing the products and the evidence-based reviews requires Adobe Reader.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
  1. Carnahan R, Gryzlak B, Weckmann M, Kelly M, Reist J, Smith M, Lenoch S, Daly J, Levy B, Seydel L, Schultz S. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists Annual Meeting, Tampa, FL; April 29-May 2, 2012. 
  2. Carnahan R, Abrams MA, Weckmann M, Savage B, Daly J, Kelly M, Levy B, Mulhausen P, Reist J, Seydel L, Smith M, Raether R, Abrams E, Holland R, Schultz S. Development of a reader-friendly patient and family guide to facilitate shared decision making on antipsychotic use in dementia. Presented at the Health Literacy Iowa and New Readers of Iowa Conference, Des Moines, IA; April 13-14, 2012.
  3. Carnahan R, Gryzlak B, Weckmann M, Kelly M, Reist J, Smith M, Lenoch S, Daly J, Levy B, Seydel L, Uhlenkamp L, Schultz S. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living Quality Symposium, Houston, TX; Feb 23-24, 2012.
  4. Weckmann M, Daly J, Gryzlak B, Kelly M, Lenoch S, Levy B, Reist J, Schultz S, Seydel L, Smith M, Carnahan R. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Annual Meeting. Phoenix, AZ; November 16-20, 2011.

This product has also been the subject of oral presentations at the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry 2012 annual meeting, the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists 2011 annual meeting, and a number of regional, state, and local conferences.

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 03/01/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , , and . Improving Antipsychotic Appropriateness in Dementia Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Alliance for Geriatric Education in Specialties Curriculum

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Alliance for Geriatrics Education in Specialties (AGES) consists of 8 interactive core curriculum modules: iatrogenic injury, delirium, dementia, polypharmacy, transitions of care, basics of geriatrics assessment and levels of care, physiology of aging, palliative care communication and medications. These 8 modules have been designed to teach specialty faculty, at all levels of their career, how to increase effectiveness and quality of care for their older adult patients. In 2009, the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill conducted a needs assessment to evaluate the potential for improvement of UNC Healthcare System specialty/subspecialty faculty regarding geriatrics care through training. Based on the assessment results, the AGES curriculum was developed, implemented, evaluated, and now available for use through POGOe. The AGES curriculum can be taught as an entire course or each module can be taught as a separate training session. The UNC Healthcare System is currently using all 8 modules for training its non-geriatrician specialty faculty. Each of the 8 module PowerPoint presentations will take approximately 60 minutes per training session. *This curriculum may also be applicable to internists and family medicine practitioners.

Educational objectives: 

Objectives by Module

Module 1:    The Physiology of Aging

•          Learners will be able to describe the normal changes that occur with aging

•          Learners will be able to identify the common age-related changes that occur in the following systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, hematology/immune, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurologic, musculoskeletal, and reproductive

 

Module 2:    Dementia

•          Learners will be able to define dementia

•          Learners will be able to name risk factors/causes for dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss why delirium and depression are predictors/red flags for dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss assessment tools/strategies for identifying dementia

•          Learners will be able to name at least 5 types of dementia

•          Learners will be able to discuss the treatment options for dementia

 

Module 3:    Delirium

•          Learners will be able to define delirium and describe its cardinal features and underlying pathophysiology

•          Learners will be able to recognize that delirium is common, under-diagnosed, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality

•          Learners will be able to, regarding delirium, identify ways to: 

»      prevent

»      diagnose

»      evaluate

»      manage

•          Learners will be able to teach key concepts in < 1 minute

•          Learners will be able to define delirium and describe its cardinal features and underlying pathophysiology

 

Module 4:    Transitions of Care

•          Learners will be able to define transitional care

•          Learners will be able to identify barriers to providing improved transitional care to patients

 

Module 5:    Basics of Geriatric Assessment & Levels of Care

•          Learners will be able to illustrate the importance of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial assessments for older adults

•          Learners will be able to describe Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs)

•          Learners will be able to demonstrate gait assessment and falls risk assessment with an older adult

•          Learners will be able to demonstrate cognitive and depression screening with an older adult

 

Module 6:    Iatrogenic Injury

•          Learners will be able to list the most common types of iatrogenic injuries

•          Learners will be able to identify the most common cause of nosocomial fever in the hospital

•          Learners will be able to identify the reasons for use of restraints and how to avoid using them

•          Learners will be able to list the appropriate use of urinary catheters

 

Module 7:    Palliative Care Communications

•          Learners will be able to address Palliative Care misconceptions: What, Why, Where, Who

•          Learners will be able to review outcomes of Palliative Care

•          Learners will be able to present general communication strategies

•          Learners will be able to discuss pain assessment and management principles for older adults

 

Module 8:    Polypharmacy

•          Learners will be able to identify risk factors for Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) in older adults

•          Learners will be able to identify the physiologic changes associated with normal aging that influence pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics

•          Learners will be able to recognize ADEs when an older adult presents with a new clinical condition or complaint

•          Learners will be able to avoid potentially harmful medications for older adults

•          Learners will be able to utilize strategies for shortening medication lists and carefully introducing new medications

 

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/29/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/29/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , and . Alliance for Geriatric Education in Specialties Curriculum. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

An Interactive Curriculum on Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This is a 2.5 hour curriculum for medical students in their clerkships on pressure ulcers. The medical students completed an online module to gain basic understanding of pressure ulcers - descriptive techniques and classification. This online module included a knowledge based pre-test. The faculty identified SNF patients with a variety of pressure ulcers - different stages and sites. The faculty conducted clinical rounds on these patients with medical students to practice pressure ulcer description, risk factors, staging and prevention. Subsequently medical students completed a post test to measure their progress towards the objectives. They also completed a program evalution survey.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Identify risk factors for pressure ulcer development
  2. Name the sites at risk for pressure ulcer development
  3. Describe pressure ulcers
  4. Stage pressure ulcers
  5. Enlist pressure ulcer prevention methods
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

20 minutes to complete online module.

Limit bedside rounds to 4 students at a time with faculty members to promote better learning and clear viewing of the pressure ulcers.

This curriculum has been reviewed by geriatrics fellows and faculty at DUMC and visiting faculty participating in the Reynolds Faculty Development program.

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 08/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . An Interactive Curriculum on Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Although health care practitioners have a legal and ethical duty to identify and intervene in suspected cases of elder abuse and mistreatment, the existing lack of knowledge and perceived barriers to reporting often interferes with this duty. The goal of the elder abuse and mistreatment learning modules is to provide case-based training to health care professionals. The training consists of two presentation modules with embedded speaker notes. Module One: Identifying Elder Abuse, focuses on the descriptions, signs and symptoms of elder abuse and mistreatment. Module Two: Screening and Intervening, concentrates on screening for elder abuse and mistreatment and provides guidance for intervention. Combined, these modules provide a basic understanding of elder abuse and mistreatment to assist health care practitioners in identifying and reporting this prominent public health problem. 

Educational objectives: 

After reviewing these modules, participants will be able to:                      

  1. Describe three types of elder abuse.
  2. List five signs and symptoms that raise suspicion of elder abuse.
  3. Identify three factors for elder abuse and neglect.
  4. Determine the steps to screen for elder abuse.
  5. Describe three interventions for victims of elder abuse.
  6. Discuss three interventions for stressed caregivers.
  7. List common community resources available to elders and their families. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Many of the slides within these presentations contain animations. It would be advisable to closely review slides prior to presenting to an audience. Embedded speaker notes are an additional feature of the presentations. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Selected Citations:

  1. Dyer CB, Hyman DJ, Festa NA, Pavlik VN:  The Profile of Texas Adult Protective Services Clients with Multiple Reports.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 22, 1999.
  2. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Festa NA:  Elder Mistreatment:  Analysis of Allegation Types and Variables Associated with Multiple Allegations from a Statewide Database.  Selected for
  3. Presentation at the Presidential Poster Session at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Nashville, TN, May 20, 2000.Dyer CB, Toronjo C, Pavlik VN, Keith M, Silverman E:  How do Adult Protective Service
  4. Specialists Recognize Valid Self neglect.  Presented at the Gerontological Society Meeting, Washington D.C., November 19, 2000.
  5. Harrell R, Toronjo C, Dyer CB:  How do Geriatricians Diagnose Elder Abuse and Neglect?  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  6. Heath J, Dyer CB, Mosqueda L:  Partnering With Adult Protective Service Agencies for Educational Experiences in Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  7. Pavlik VN, Barth J, Khan F, Phung M, Lo M, Turner R, Hyman DJ, Dyer CB:  Abnormal Nutritional Markers in Elder Mistreatment Patients.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 17, 2001.
  8. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Mitchell B, Hyman DJ, Poythress EL:  Neurospychiatric Testing in Elders with Self-Neglect.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., May 11, 2002.
  9. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, Ma, November 24, 2002.
  10. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, MA, November 24, 2002.
  11. R Hariharan, SG Nash, VN Pavlik, J King, CB Dyer: Medical Complexities Among Elderly Abused and Neglected Patients. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  12. CB Dyer, VN Pavlik, T Regev, M Vogel, DJ Hyman, B Mitchell, EL Poythress: Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Unresolved Elder Mistreatment Cases. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  13. Poythress E, Tremaine B, Dyer CB: Self-Neglecters Who Live in Squalor. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  14. Dyer CB, Pavlik V, Delgado M, Regev C, Vogel B, Tremaine B: Characterizing Victims of Financial Exploitation. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  15. Patel A, Fisher CJW, Dyer CB: Characterizing Sexual Abuse in Older Adults. Presented at the  American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Las Vegas, Na, May 20, 2004.
  16. Kim L, Nieves L, Dyer CB:  Do Medical Examines Determine Elder Mistreatment as a Cause of Death?  Presented at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 14, 2005.
  17. Dyer CB, Nieves LE, Delossantos O, Barth J, Poythress EL, Vogel M, Tremaine B, Neycheril A, Harlan J, Kim L: The Cognitive, Functional and Social Profiles of 500 Cases of Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 11, 2005.
  18. Dyer CB, Kim LC: "Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, & Exploitation" Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefeld, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston, and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  19. Dyer CB,Kim LC: “Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation”, Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefield, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  20. Mehta MM, Dyer CB:  “A Practical Approach to Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation”, Practice of Geriatrics, 4th Edition, 2007.
  21. Brandl B, Dyer CB, Heisler CJ, Otto J, Stiegel L, Thomas R: Elder Abuse Detection and Intervention: A Collaborative Approach.  2006 Springer.

Selected Presentations:

  1. “ Elder Mistreatment: Identification, Treatment and the Prevention of Premature Death” Principles of Geriatric Care: A Certificate Program for Health Care Professionals,Houston, TX Feb 21, 2012
  2. “The Medical Signs of Abuse and Neglect”. Elder Justice Care Seminar, National Advocacy Center, Columbia, SC, January 5, 2011.
Date posted: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Building a Palliative Care Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is a PPT presentation given to the NJ Hospital Association's Council on End-of-life and Palliative Care. This presentation looks at the tools needed to start a Palliative Care Program in various settings. From this presentation, the reader will learn how to make an inventory of their own needs as well as those of the facility where they are intending to begin the program. There is a step-by-step approach delineated as to how to assess your stakeholders and address their needs. Once the program has been considered, the reader will learn how to make the appropriate "pitch" to the administrators and stakeholders of the facility to appeal to the monetary as well as humanitarian aspects of care. The reader will also learn about sources of funding and how to make a program that is sustainable and will become a staple in the institution.

Date posted: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Building a Palliative Care Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

Polypharmacy Pocket Card

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This pocket card on "Polypharmacy" was developed as a supplement to teaching polypharmacy to ward teams in the inpatient setting; however, it applies to patients in all care settings across the continuum. It includes both an overview of polypharmacy concepts such as risk factors and consequences, as well as immediately applicable tools such as clinical considerations in older adults, the Beer's Criteria, and the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI).

Educational objectives: 

With use of this pocket card, learners should be able to:

  1. Diagnose polypharmacy occurence in patients of all ages
  2. Explain the adverse consequences associated with polypharmacy
  3. Manage patients' medication lists by stopping and starting medications appropriately
  4. Apply validated resources to decrease polypharmacy such as the Beers Citeria and the MAI
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Uses:

  1. The card is most commonly discussed and handed to learners in real time evalutaion of medication reconciliation and order writing during admission day rounds.
  2. The card has been used in the manner of "educational detailing" for raising awareness of polypharmacy and giving tools for immediate intervention.
  3. The card has been used by trainees to teach other trainees about polypharmacy as they move onto other services.
  4. The card is used as a supplement to polypharmacy lectures given to medical students, house officers, and fellows in different teaching venues.

This pocket card can also be accessed at http://www.gerisage.com/pocket_cards/Polypharmacy.pdf

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/15/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 05/29/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Polypharmacy Pocket Card. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/219

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