The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Neurology

Dementia & Delirium TBL

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This program is a team based learning program we use with our third year medical students in our longitudinal integrated curriculum. Both the facilitator and student version are included. The IRAT and GRAT cover broad areas of dementia and delirium including the diagnosis of postoperative delirium in a patient with dementia, interventions to prevent & treat delirium, outcomes of delirium, the pharmacologic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, distinguishing mild cognitive impairment from Alzheimer’s disease, and the principles of comprehensive care for dementia patients. The application exercise is a case which requires synthesis and analysis as a team and requires considerations in comprehensive care of the patient.

Educational objectives: 

After completing this material you will be able to:

  1. Diagnose postoperative delirium in a patient with dementia.
  2. Describe interventions to prevent & treat delirium.
  3. Describe outcomes of delirium.
  4. Understand the pharmacologic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.
  5. Differentiate mild cognitive impairment from Alzheimer’s disease.
  6. Apply principles of comprehensive care for dementia patients.
Date posted: 
Mon, 06/13/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 06/13/2016
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Dementia & Delirium TBL. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Hearing Loss in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

This PowerPoint video and audio discusses the pathophysiology, evaluation and treatment of hearing loss. Communicating with patients with hearing loss will be taught, all in less than 6 minutes.

Educational objectives: 

Understand the causes of hearing loss

Be able to better communicate with patients who have hearing loss

Date posted: 
Mon, 06/30/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 03/16/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Hearing Loss in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Brief Cognitive Screening in Older Adults

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This module provides an overview of a variety of brief cognitive screening measures that exist in the public domain and can easily be integrated in care settings that serve older adults. The online module is designed to be an interactive didactic experience, which includes short videos, reflection questions, and experiential exercises.

Although this module is best implemented as a group activity with partners (particularly Section 3, which includes role play as both clinician and patient), it can be adapted and completed individually as well.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Discuss the purpose of evidence based brief cognitive screening instruments
  2. Review pros and cons of five brief screens
  3. Practice administration and scoring of brief cognitive screens.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The entire course for Brief Cognitive Screening for Older Adults is hosted on the Oklahoma Geriatric Education Center (Ok-GEC) website through the Donald W. Reynolds Dept of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC). http://www.ouhsc.edu/okgec/documents/Sorocco_Online_Courses/BriefCognitiveScreenCourse.pdf and consists of three sections:

  1. Intro to Brief Cognitive Screens for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar and two open-ended reflection questions (Survey Monkey link).
  2. Selecting a Brief Cognitive Screen for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar, links to download and review 5 brief cognitive screening tools, and reflective question (Survey Monkey link).
  3. Experience Using a Brief Cognitive Screen for Older Adults: Includes link to webinar, an experiential exercise of provider/patient role play (you will need to find a partner for this exercise) with instrument of choice (from the links provided in Section 2) to practice administration and scoring, reflective question, and final learner and course assessments (Survey Monkey link).
Date posted: 
Tue, 09/23/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 05/01/2015
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Please view course at: http://www.ouhsc.edu/okgec/documents/Sorocco_Online_Courses/BriefCognitiveScreenCourse.pdf
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Brief Cognitive Screening in Older Adults. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Informed Consent Model for Code Status Discussion

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The "Informed Consent Model for Code Status Discussion" educational product is a competency-based interactive experience designed to educate participants regarding the components of an effective code status discussion and improve their skills in conducting these critical discussions. The program highlights studies outlining the efficacy of CPR in a variety of clinical settings, provides an efficient and effective outline for code status discussions, affords participants an opportunity to examine how they currently conduct these discussions, and provides a carefully devised example of phrases participants can use to provide patients with information to facilitate informed decision making regarding code status.

Educational objectives: 

After participation in the training experience, the participant will be able to:
1. Explain the percent survival to hospital discharge after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for a variety of clinical situations.
2. List at least 3 phrases to avoid and alternative phrases to use when discussing code status with adults with advanced illness and limited prognosis.
3. Conduct an effective goals-of-care discussion regarding code status.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Effectiveness and Significance

The presentation has been well received in small groups and in large conference settings. The educational session was one of the highest rated presentations at the Utah State Advance Care Planning and POLST Conference that was attended by over 50 health professionals representing numerous disciplines. The educational session has also been shared in small groups with the Internal Medicine Interns (n=39) at the University of Utah during their 2011-2012 geriatrics rotation. 17 interns completed a voluntary, confidential pre- and post-experience survey, which assessed their self-efficacy regarding code status utilizing a 5-point Likert scale for measurement (1= strongly disagree, 2=disagree, 3=neutral, 4=agree, 5=strongly agree). Prior to the educational session, interns had a “neutral” response to the statement “I feel comfortable conducting a code status discussion” (mean Likert Score of 3.18 SD 1.07); after the educational session interns' Likert scores for the same statement improved to 4.59 SD 0.5.

 

Lessons Learned

Health professionals are expected to discuss code status with patients but many of them do not feel prepared for these discussions. Language used in these discussions can have unwanted consequences.

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/07/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 09/05/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Informed Consent Model for Code Status Discussion. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

It's My Old Back, Again: An Approach to Diagnosing and Managing Back Pain in the Older Adult.

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Assessing and treating pain in older adults is of critical importance for nearly all health care providers. Back pain is a common, costly, disabling, yet under-addressed condition in this population. Specifically, musculoskeletal conditions, such as back pain - the focus of this educational module - are the leading causes of pain as adults age. This self-directed, web-based, interactive educational module addresses the evaluation and management of back pain in older adults. The audience for this module is anyone who provides care (both out-patient and in-patient) for older adults with back pain.

Educational objectives: 

1) Summarize the prevalence and impact of back pain in older persons.

2) Describe how to clinically evaluate back pain including a detailed examination.

3) List the differential diagnosis of back pain in older persons.

4) Explain how to manage the most common etiologies of back pain in older adults.

4) Summarize the risks, benefits and guidelines for specific pharmacologic management of back pain in older adults and how to minimize and monitor for adverse effects.

5) Summarize the various non-pharmacological approaches to managing back pain.

6) Describe which situations are appropriate for referral to more specialized care.

Date posted: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . It's My Old Back, Again: An Approach to Diagnosing and Managing Back Pain in the Older Adult. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Delirium: Prevention and Management in Hospitalized Elders

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

This course is intended for interdisciplinary members of the healthcare team in the hospital setting to improve knowledge of issues surrounding delirium in the elderly hospitalized patient. This 23-question module focuses on the evidence behind the recognition, prevention, and management of delirium in the geriatric patient.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion the learner will be able to:

1. Use the Confusion Assessment Method to screen for delirium.

2. Understand features that differentiate delirium from dementia.

3. Name at least  five risk factors for delirium and techniques that target each risk factor to prevent the development of delirium.

4. Name at least three drugs that should be avoided in the geriatric patient.

5. Understand basic principles to the management of delirium, including work-up, behavioral management, and pharmacologic management.

6. Understand the importance of documentation of delirium and ways to improve transitions of care.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This program will consist of 23 multiple choice questions on delirium in the geriatric patient in the hospital setting. The module will begin with two questions every other day in a single email from the website, www.qstream.com. This website will facilitate the delivery of questions and answers to the participant. You must log in to the website from the link posted above.

  •  If a question is answered incorrectly, the participant will receive the same question 5 days later.
  •  If a question is answered correctly, the participant will receive the same question 14 days later.
  •  If the participant answers the question correctly two times in a row, the question is then retired from the program and  is no longer repeated.
  •  The participant will complete the program when all 23 questions are retired (each question is answered correctly twice in  a row).  However, CE credit may be given when the program is 80% completed.

Given these parameters, it is estimated that the participant will complete the program in less than three months.

Participants may receive credit or contact hours ONLY by completing 80% of the questions in a module AND completing the end of module survey in LESS than four months time of enrollment.

Date posted: 
Wed, 11/13/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 11/13/2013
Product Viewing Instructions: 
You must register for the class and create a username
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Delirium: Prevention and Management in Hospitalized Elders. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Communicating with Patients who have Dementia

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Communicating with Patients who have Dementia is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. List 3 verbal strategies that can improve communication with patients who have dementia
  2. List 3 non-verbal strategies that can improve communication with patients who have dementia
  3. List 3 things to avoid when talking to patients who have dementia
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as

  1. content is not changed,
  2. no one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. the reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatric Education Center."

For more information on this series, go to http://www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu/EduProducts/El...

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.

Date posted: 
Tue, 10/29/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 03/06/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Communicating with Patients who have Dementia. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

SAGE Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

The UT Southwestern SAGE Urinary Incontinence module is a comprehensive core curriculum on UI in the elderly which can be incorporated into existing UME courses at both the pre-clinical and clinical levels. After completion of the program, medical students will have been trained in the basic evaluation and treatment of UI in the elderly. The program and learning platforms are created in sequential modules so that components can be utilized in different courses (anatomy, physiology, pharmacology) and for different levels of learners (clinical cases for 3rd and 4th year students). Modules also lend themselves to be utilized as clinical correlations in basic science courses.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of the UI modules, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the anatomy and physiology of the continence mechanism.
  • Discuss the age-related changes in the anatomy and physiology of the lower urinary tract (LUT) which increase the risk of UI.
  • Evaluate and diagnose the cause of a patient's urinary incontinence.
  • Create a treatment and management plan for a patient with urinary incontinence.
  • Describe how medications can cause UI and also understand complications from medications used to treat UI.
Date posted: 
Tue, 01/29/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 04/30/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . SAGE Urinary Incontinence in the Elderly. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Improving Antipsychotic Appropriateness in Dementia Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This website includes information and resources to help clinicians, providers, and consumers better understand how to manage problem behaviors and psychosis in people with dementia using evidence-based approaches. This includes brief lectures, written content, quick reference guides for clinicians and providers, and information for families or patients on the risks and benefits of antipsychotics for people with dementia (a.k.a. Alzheimer’s disease and others). You can also request laminated quick reference guides to use in your practice, which can help you put the strategies you learn about into action.

Educational objectives: 
On completion, the learner will be able to:
  1. List appropriate initial assessments to help determine the causes of problem behaviors or psychosis in dementia.
  2. Apply non-drug strategies to manage problem behaviors or psychosis in dementia.
  3. Assess delirium signs and symptoms using a delirium screening tool.
  4. Determine when an antipsychotic might be appropriate or inappropriate in a person with dementia, depending on symptoms and the type of dementia.
  5. Select an optimal antipsychotic for a patient with dementia based on efficacy, side effects, and patient comorbidities.
  6. Recognize antipsychotic side effects in a person with dementia.
  7. Discuss the risks and benefits of antipsychotics with patients and families using a shared decision making information sheet as a guide.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This program is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (R18 HS19355-01).

The quick reference guides were reviewed by healthcare practitioners and direct care providers during development. The family guide was reviewed by the New Readers of Iowa and Alzheimer's Association support group participants.

Viewing the videos requires a broadband Internet connection, sound capability, and one of the following supported browsers, with JavaScript enabled:

  • Internet Explorer 7 or later on Windows with Flash version 11.1 or later
  • Chrome 15 or later, Firefox 8 or later, or Opera 10.5 or later on Windows
  • Firefox 8 or later, or Safari 5 or later on Mac OS X
  • iPad 1 or later

Viewing and printing the products and the evidence-based reviews requires Adobe Reader.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
  1. Carnahan R, Gryzlak B, Weckmann M, Kelly M, Reist J, Smith M, Lenoch S, Daly J, Levy B, Seydel L, Schultz S. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists Annual Meeting, Tampa, FL; April 29-May 2, 2012. 
  2. Carnahan R, Abrams MA, Weckmann M, Savage B, Daly J, Kelly M, Levy B, Mulhausen P, Reist J, Seydel L, Smith M, Raether R, Abrams E, Holland R, Schultz S. Development of a reader-friendly patient and family guide to facilitate shared decision making on antipsychotic use in dementia. Presented at the Health Literacy Iowa and New Readers of Iowa Conference, Des Moines, IA; April 13-14, 2012.
  3. Carnahan R, Gryzlak B, Weckmann M, Kelly M, Reist J, Smith M, Lenoch S, Daly J, Levy B, Seydel L, Uhlenkamp L, Schultz S. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living Quality Symposium, Houston, TX; Feb 23-24, 2012.
  4. Weckmann M, Daly J, Gryzlak B, Kelly M, Lenoch S, Levy B, Reist J, Schultz S, Seydel L, Smith M, Carnahan R. Decisional aides to train non-psychiatrists in evidence based use of antipsychotics in dementia. Poster presented at the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Annual Meeting. Phoenix, AZ; November 16-20, 2011.

This product has also been the subject of oral presentations at the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry 2012 annual meeting, the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists 2011 annual meeting, and a number of regional, state, and local conferences.

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 03/01/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , , , , and . Improving Antipsychotic Appropriateness in Dementia Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Although health care practitioners have a legal and ethical duty to identify and intervene in suspected cases of elder abuse and mistreatment, the existing lack of knowledge and perceived barriers to reporting often interferes with this duty. The goal of the elder abuse and mistreatment learning modules is to provide case-based training to health care professionals. The training consists of two presentation modules with embedded speaker notes. Module One: Identifying Elder Abuse, focuses on the descriptions, signs and symptoms of elder abuse and mistreatment. Module Two: Screening and Intervening, concentrates on screening for elder abuse and mistreatment and provides guidance for intervention. Combined, these modules provide a basic understanding of elder abuse and mistreatment to assist health care practitioners in identifying and reporting this prominent public health problem. 

Educational objectives: 

After reviewing these modules, participants will be able to:                      

  1. Describe three types of elder abuse.
  2. List five signs and symptoms that raise suspicion of elder abuse.
  3. Identify three factors for elder abuse and neglect.
  4. Determine the steps to screen for elder abuse.
  5. Describe three interventions for victims of elder abuse.
  6. Discuss three interventions for stressed caregivers.
  7. List common community resources available to elders and their families. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Many of the slides within these presentations contain animations. It would be advisable to closely review slides prior to presenting to an audience. Embedded speaker notes are an additional feature of the presentations. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Selected Citations:

  1. Dyer CB, Hyman DJ, Festa NA, Pavlik VN:  The Profile of Texas Adult Protective Services Clients with Multiple Reports.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 22, 1999.
  2. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Festa NA:  Elder Mistreatment:  Analysis of Allegation Types and Variables Associated with Multiple Allegations from a Statewide Database.  Selected for
  3. Presentation at the Presidential Poster Session at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Nashville, TN, May 20, 2000.Dyer CB, Toronjo C, Pavlik VN, Keith M, Silverman E:  How do Adult Protective Service
  4. Specialists Recognize Valid Self neglect.  Presented at the Gerontological Society Meeting, Washington D.C., November 19, 2000.
  5. Harrell R, Toronjo C, Dyer CB:  How do Geriatricians Diagnose Elder Abuse and Neglect?  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  6. Heath J, Dyer CB, Mosqueda L:  Partnering With Adult Protective Service Agencies for Educational Experiences in Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  7. Pavlik VN, Barth J, Khan F, Phung M, Lo M, Turner R, Hyman DJ, Dyer CB:  Abnormal Nutritional Markers in Elder Mistreatment Patients.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 17, 2001.
  8. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Mitchell B, Hyman DJ, Poythress EL:  Neurospychiatric Testing in Elders with Self-Neglect.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., May 11, 2002.
  9. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, Ma, November 24, 2002.
  10. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, MA, November 24, 2002.
  11. R Hariharan, SG Nash, VN Pavlik, J King, CB Dyer: Medical Complexities Among Elderly Abused and Neglected Patients. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  12. CB Dyer, VN Pavlik, T Regev, M Vogel, DJ Hyman, B Mitchell, EL Poythress: Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Unresolved Elder Mistreatment Cases. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  13. Poythress E, Tremaine B, Dyer CB: Self-Neglecters Who Live in Squalor. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  14. Dyer CB, Pavlik V, Delgado M, Regev C, Vogel B, Tremaine B: Characterizing Victims of Financial Exploitation. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  15. Patel A, Fisher CJW, Dyer CB: Characterizing Sexual Abuse in Older Adults. Presented at the  American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Las Vegas, Na, May 20, 2004.
  16. Kim L, Nieves L, Dyer CB:  Do Medical Examines Determine Elder Mistreatment as a Cause of Death?  Presented at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 14, 2005.
  17. Dyer CB, Nieves LE, Delossantos O, Barth J, Poythress EL, Vogel M, Tremaine B, Neycheril A, Harlan J, Kim L: The Cognitive, Functional and Social Profiles of 500 Cases of Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 11, 2005.
  18. Dyer CB, Kim LC: "Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, & Exploitation" Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefeld, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston, and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  19. Dyer CB,Kim LC: “Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation”, Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefield, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  20. Mehta MM, Dyer CB:  “A Practical Approach to Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation”, Practice of Geriatrics, 4th Edition, 2007.
  21. Brandl B, Dyer CB, Heisler CJ, Otto J, Stiegel L, Thomas R: Elder Abuse Detection and Intervention: A Collaborative Approach.  2006 Springer.

Selected Presentations:

  1. “ Elder Mistreatment: Identification, Treatment and the Prevention of Premature Death” Principles of Geriatric Care: A Certificate Program for Health Care Professionals,Houston, TX Feb 21, 2012
  2. “The Medical Signs of Abuse and Neglect”. Elder Justice Care Seminar, National Advocacy Center, Columbia, SC, January 5, 2011.
Date posted: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/212

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