The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Medical Ethics

Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 88

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Caring Across the Continuum: An Aging Virtual Patient Series. Case Four: Mrs. Porter Age 88 - Introduction to Palliative Care. This case, the fourth in a four-part series about the virtual patient, Mrs. Porter, introduces the learner to palliative care and hospice concepts and is set in an Acute Care for the Elderly (ACE) Unit.  Mrs. Porter has become less mobile, weak and is depressed. She has become more confused and has unintentionally lost 12 pounds since her last visit with Dr. Pat three months ago. Concepts included in this case are conducting a functional and nutritional assessment; setting goals of care; conducting a family conference; discussing Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders; discussing a hospice referral;  and, recognition of the interprofessional practitioners’ contributions to patient care.The case concludes with a home hospice care order for Mrs. Porter. The learner is asked to write a discharge summary for Geriatric Failure to Thrive, taking into account all the details in the case example of Mrs. Porter's family meeting with the interprofessional team.

Educational objectives: 

On completion of Case Four: Mrs. Porter Age 88, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the clinical presentation of malnutrition
  2. Identify common contributing factors of malnutrition in older adults
  3. Define palliative care
  4. Identify at least three characteristics of palliative care
  5. Define general hospice criteria and criteria for failure to thrive/debility
  6. Demonstrate the ability to express the relative risks and benefits of treatment options
  7. Identify the key steps in conducting a family meeting;
  8. Describe strategies for working with families when there is disagreement or indecision
  9. Document a complete summary of the family conference
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product is one part of a short series consisting of the following products:

As an innovative, virtual learning series, this web-based series of cases spans the 21-year relationship of care between geriatrician Dr. Patricia Thompson and her patient, Mrs. Alice Porter. This virtual learning experience for medical students, based on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) competencies, is designed to pique interest and enhance knowledge and skills in the care of older adults. The web-based learning environment provides students the unique opportunity to observe and interact with Mrs. Porter, in an ongoing doctor-patient relationship, outside of the traditional classroom setting. The series exposes students to the importance of continuity of patient care, since each case correlates to a different year of medical school education. As the medical student advances in their curriculum, Mrs. Porter continues to age, requiring more complex care and further application of critical thinking skills from the student. Each case has a unique focus that targets key geriatric and/or palliative concepts appropriate to the level of the student that can easily be embedded into existing medical school courses.

The virtual cases allow students to explore approaches to the patient; observe model clinician-patient interactions; choose practice techniques; offer health promotion, palliative counseling, and patient counseling; and contemplate complex ethical decisions regarding the care of the patient in an innocuous, self-paced, virtual environment. The embedded natural language system in each case offers an opportunity to pose real-world questions and problems to the learner, with the goal of eliciting critical thinking skills and reflective learning.

The series offers a readily available complementary assignment to the classroom and clinical experience. The self-paced case studies contain video animation, an interactive electronic medical record, Geriatric Gems and Palliative Pearls, natural language style critical thinking, clinical reasoning and clinical judgment learning activities, and evidence-based expert explanations. Evaluative tools include a pre and post quiz and rubric-scored natural language short answer and essay questions. The natural language system provides hints to the students and evaluates their responses based on the information they provide. Student actions and choices are captured for formative evaluation, as well as to provide student feedback.

The virtual patient system is a web-based application that runs on Windows Server, running IIS with ASP enabled within IIS. The project database is Microsoft Access.

The first time you explore a case, you will need to register. There is a "Register" button at the bottom of the login form. Click this button to register or to have your password sent to the email address you entered when you registered.

On the popup registration form, you will need to enter an ID and a password. Your ID can be anything you wish. You can use the same User ID and password for any of the four cases. All of the other fields are optional. (The email field is optional. If you don't enter an email address when you register, the system can't send you your password and/or ID if you forget them.)

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Using a Virtual Patient to Teach the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to Medical Students. Poster presented February 24, 2012 at the AGHE Annual Meeting and Educational Leadership Conference.

Instructional Design and Management of a Virtual World: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Project Demonstration presented February 3, 2011 at The University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education Interprofessional Health Science Education Conference.

Design and Management in a Virtual Environment: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Presented October 25, 2010 at the Ninth Annual Reynolds Grantee Meeting.

Date posted: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 88. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Theme-Based Journal

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

These reflective journal activities encourage students to take a holistic approach to assessing their experiences encountered with aging patients. Through the questions posed in each journal activity, students are challenged to reflect on their patient interaction in their clinical rotations with compassion and empathy for the patient experience. The goal is for each student to develop a more patient-centered health care practice. 

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Summarize thoughts, reflections, and experiences as related to the geriatric rotation experience.
  2. Express core geriatric learning principles through reflective and thoughtful writing.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of one’s own perspective when caring for aging patients.  
  4. Demonstrate an awareness of the value of the interprofessional team when caring for aging patients.  
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The journal can be used alone or in combination with the TEXAS Medical Clerkship Program.

The estimated completion time is per journal activity. 

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/24/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Theme-Based Journal. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Although health care practitioners have a legal and ethical duty to identify and intervene in suspected cases of elder abuse and mistreatment, the existing lack of knowledge and perceived barriers to reporting often interferes with this duty. The goal of the elder abuse and mistreatment learning modules is to provide case-based training to health care professionals. The training consists of two presentation modules with embedded speaker notes. Module One: Identifying Elder Abuse, focuses on the descriptions, signs and symptoms of elder abuse and mistreatment. Module Two: Screening and Intervening, concentrates on screening for elder abuse and mistreatment and provides guidance for intervention. Combined, these modules provide a basic understanding of elder abuse and mistreatment to assist health care practitioners in identifying and reporting this prominent public health problem. 

Educational objectives: 

After reviewing these modules, participants will be able to:                      

  1. Describe three types of elder abuse.
  2. List five signs and symptoms that raise suspicion of elder abuse.
  3. Identify three factors for elder abuse and neglect.
  4. Determine the steps to screen for elder abuse.
  5. Describe three interventions for victims of elder abuse.
  6. Discuss three interventions for stressed caregivers.
  7. List common community resources available to elders and their families. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Many of the slides within these presentations contain animations. It would be advisable to closely review slides prior to presenting to an audience. Embedded speaker notes are an additional feature of the presentations. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Selected Citations:

  1. Dyer CB, Hyman DJ, Festa NA, Pavlik VN:  The Profile of Texas Adult Protective Services Clients with Multiple Reports.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 22, 1999.
  2. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Festa NA:  Elder Mistreatment:  Analysis of Allegation Types and Variables Associated with Multiple Allegations from a Statewide Database.  Selected for
  3. Presentation at the Presidential Poster Session at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Nashville, TN, May 20, 2000.Dyer CB, Toronjo C, Pavlik VN, Keith M, Silverman E:  How do Adult Protective Service
  4. Specialists Recognize Valid Self neglect.  Presented at the Gerontological Society Meeting, Washington D.C., November 19, 2000.
  5. Harrell R, Toronjo C, Dyer CB:  How do Geriatricians Diagnose Elder Abuse and Neglect?  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  6. Heath J, Dyer CB, Mosqueda L:  Partnering With Adult Protective Service Agencies for Educational Experiences in Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Chicago, IL, May 10, 2001.
  7. Pavlik VN, Barth J, Khan F, Phung M, Lo M, Turner R, Hyman DJ, Dyer CB:  Abnormal Nutritional Markers in Elder Mistreatment Patients.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 17, 2001.
  8. Dyer CB, Pavlik VN, Mitchell B, Hyman DJ, Poythress EL:  Neurospychiatric Testing in Elders with Self-Neglect.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., May 11, 2002.
  9. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, Ma, November 24, 2002.
  10. Dyer CB:  Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Elder Abuse.  Presented at the Gerontological Society of America’s 55th Annual Scientific Meeting, Boston, MA, November 24, 2002.
  11. R Hariharan, SG Nash, VN Pavlik, J King, CB Dyer: Medical Complexities Among Elderly Abused and Neglected Patients. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  12. CB Dyer, VN Pavlik, T Regev, M Vogel, DJ Hyman, B Mitchell, EL Poythress: Outcomes of Interdisciplinary Geriatric Assessment and Intervention in Unresolved Elder Mistreatment Cases. Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Baltimore, MD, May 14th-18th, 2003.
  13. Poythress E, Tremaine B, Dyer CB: Self-Neglecters Who Live in Squalor. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  14. Dyer CB, Pavlik V, Delgado M, Regev C, Vogel B, Tremaine B: Characterizing Victims of Financial Exploitation. Presented at the Gerontological Society of America's 56th Annual Scientific Meeting, San Diego, CA, November 21st-25th, 2003.
  15. Patel A, Fisher CJW, Dyer CB: Characterizing Sexual Abuse in Older Adults. Presented at the  American Geriatrics Society Meeting, Las Vegas, Na, May 20, 2004.
  16. Kim L, Nieves L, Dyer CB:  Do Medical Examines Determine Elder Mistreatment as a Cause of Death?  Presented at the American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 14, 2005.
  17. Dyer CB, Nieves LE, Delossantos O, Barth J, Poythress EL, Vogel M, Tremaine B, Neycheril A, Harlan J, Kim L: The Cognitive, Functional and Social Profiles of 500 Cases of Elder Mistreatment.  Presented at the American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 11, 2005.
  18. Dyer CB, Kim LC: "Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, & Exploitation" Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefeld, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston, and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  19. Dyer CB,Kim LC: “Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation”, Current Geriatric Diagnosis & Treatment, Landefield, Palmer, Johnson, Johnston and Lyons eds. McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  20. Mehta MM, Dyer CB:  “A Practical Approach to Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation”, Practice of Geriatrics, 4th Edition, 2007.
  21. Brandl B, Dyer CB, Heisler CJ, Otto J, Stiegel L, Thomas R: Elder Abuse Detection and Intervention: A Collaborative Approach.  2006 Springer.

Selected Presentations:

  1. “ Elder Mistreatment: Identification, Treatment and the Prevention of Premature Death” Principles of Geriatric Care: A Certificate Program for Health Care Professionals,Houston, TX Feb 21, 2012
  2. “The Medical Signs of Abuse and Neglect”. Elder Justice Care Seminar, National Advocacy Center, Columbia, SC, January 5, 2011.
Date posted: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/19/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Elder Abuse and Mistreatment: A Two-Part Training Program. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

After reading this issue of Elder Care, you should be able to…

  1. Identify reasons why clinicians fail to report elder abuse to Adult Protective Service (APS) agencies
  2. State current recommendations about screening for elder abuse
  3. Report suspected elder abuse to APS and know what to expect in terms of a response from APS.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as

  1. content is not changed,
  2. no one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. the reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatric Education Center."
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly. (Available at www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu/EduProducts/ElderCareProviderSheets.cfm)

Date posted: 
Wed, 02/29/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 05/10/2021
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Elder Abuse: Clinician Reporting. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Elder Abuse and Neglect Mandated Reporter Card - California

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

Template for a half-page card including: Elder abuse and neglect types and definitions in California, Mandated reporter requirement under CA WIC Code, Instructions on how to make a report of suspected abuse or neglect and Sample of reporting agencies.

Educational objectives: 
  • Recognize that anyone with full or intermittent responsibility for care or custody of an elder or dependent adult is mandated to report suspected Elder and Dependent Adult Abuse in California
  • Identify the types of abuse and neglect that require a mandated report in CA
  • Identify and compare Adult Protective Services and Long-term Care Ombudsman as agencies that will help consult about a situation, accept reports, and investigate alleged mistreatment

 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

For additional training materials on abuse and neglect, visit the Training Institute section of the website of the Center of Excellence on Elder Abuse & Neglect at UC Irvine http://www.centeronelderabuse.org

Date posted: 
Mon, 05/13/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 05/13/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Abuse and Neglect Mandated Reporter Card - California. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Ethics and Spiritual Care at the End of Life

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

In our increasingly complex medical system, physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as patients and their family members, often face difficult decisions regarding end-of-life care.  In addition to being emotionally challenging, such decisions involve complex ethical considerations. Furthermore, physicians are increasingly recognizing the importance of spiritual care at all stages of treatment, but particularly when patients are facing death. For many patients, spiritual and religious beliefs and convictions play an important role in addressing end-of-life issues and informing ethically difficult decisions. This symposium will bring together physicians, healthcare providers, chaplains and spiritual care providers, and interested members of the community to examine key themes in both clinical ethics and spiritual care at the end-of-life.

Educational objectives: 
  • Gain knowledge of relevant ethical principles regarding end-of-life treatment decisions (e.g., understanding distinctions between ordinary/proportionate and extraordinary/disproportionate health care interventions.).
  • Physicians will appreciate the trends in this medical literature as it applies to their own clinical practice, and make recommendations accordingly.
  • Physicians will become more adept at discussing spiritual issues with a patient in a clinical context.
  • Physicians will understand the need for a spiritual history, and gain practical tools to use in gathering this history in a clinical setting with their elderly patients.
  • Physicians and other health professionals will enhance their cultural competence by including religious and spiritual dimensions in their consideration of cultural factors that affect and influence patients' experience of illness and medical decision making.
Date posted: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . Ethics and Spiritual Care at the End of Life. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Interdisciplinary Team Training for Learners on an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation Service

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This tool is a double-sided pocket card intended to familiarize various learners with the many different functional impairments with which hospitalized elderly patients are vulnerable.  Specifically, the tool includes a set of twelve critically important areas which should receive thoughtful consideration when performing an inpatient geriatrics consultation, as well as a subset of questions for each area of functional impairment which should be sequentially addressed. This tool was developed in conjunction with the interdisciplinary team members on a well established Acute Care for Elders Consult Service in an urban, academic safety-net setting (Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN), with the secondary goal of assisting learners in identifying the roles of each member of the ACE interdisciplinary team and using these team members to help answer the questions on the pocket card when the team meets to discuss the patient. While this pocket card intends to provide the foundational elements of care recommended in most patients who receive ACE consultation, there clearly may be other appropriate recommendations to apply as every patient is a unique individual, and this card is furthermore applicable to any inpatient setting where care is delivered to the elderly, with or without the presence of an ACE team.

Educational objectives: 

By using this pocket card during daily interdisciplinary teaching rounds on a one-week Acute Care for Elders Consult Service rotation, the learner will demonstrate proficiency in the following two objectives:

  1. To recognize 12 of the most common geriatric syndromes and complex care needs of the typical patient seen in Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation, including goals of care & advance care planning.
  2. To be able to independently derive an appropriate list of recommendations for each of the identified syndromes and complex care needs recognized in each patient seen, incorporating the unique contributions of the members of the team.

"Proficiency" is demonstrated by the learner being able to use this pocket card as a guide to formulate appropriate assessments and plans for each patient seen in ACE consultation, taking into account the recommendations of the interdisciplinary team members which include social work, case management, nursing, physical & occupational therapy, and pharmacy.  It is further intended that learners will keep this pocket card for use when developing care plans for elderly patients in other non-geriatric venues.  Learners that will benefit from using this pocket card include medical students, family medicine and internal medicine interns and residents, medicine-pediatrics residents, geriatric fellows, and nurse practitioner / pharmacy / therapy students.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This interdisciplinary team teaching tool was developed by 3 current GACA recipients (Bowman, Nazir and James) in collaboration with one of their mentors (Westmoreland).  It was a joint process closely developed with the suggestions of nursing, therapy, pharmacy, and social work members of our team, in addition to the recommendations and guidance of the 4 authoring physicians.

The tool has been printed double-sided in color on 9 1/2 X 13 inch size paper, has been laminated for permanence and distributed to various areas of our hospital, in particular to the places where teaching rounds are conducted and where housestaff enter their notes daily into the EMR. It has also been made available to other IUSM teaching hospitals with ACE consult services who host medical trainees of varying disciplines. A non-laminated form has also been widely disseminated in the orientation materials distributed at the start of the rotation for all resident and fellow learners. The intention is that once folded it can serve as a pocket-sized tool for future reference even after the learner has rotated off the ACE service. 

Learners are strongly encouraged to carry this pocket card with them especially when seeing new hospital consults on ACE interdisciplinary teaching rounds. When encountering a learner who has difficulty synthesizing an assessment and plan based upon the patient's functional syndromes, he/she is openly encouraged to look at the card and use it as a guide for developing the plan of care. Through the use of this tool we have strived to assist new learners in "thinking like a geriatrician." A downstream effect of this tool is that we have been able to streamline the sometimes lengthy and repetitious discussions that take place during interdisciplinary teaching rounds, without compromising overall teaching time and quality (such as not having to remind learners daily to assess for tethers or prn medications given overnight). Through this process, we have found that our learners are more proactive, teaching rounds are not only more productive and conducive to learning, but most importantly there is more time for bedside teaching with the other team members leading the way because we don't spend as much time sitting at a table prompting learners to think about these issues - they have already proactively started thinking about them before rounds even begin.

This tool has been reviewed locally by IUSM senior faculty who are also mentors of authors Bowman, Nazir and James. Also closely reivewed in collaboration with all the non-physician members of our interdisciplinary team, without whom this product would not have been possible.

Date posted: 
Wed, 08/31/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 08/31/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Interdisciplinary Team Training for Learners on an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) Consultation Service. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: Best Practice Recommendations

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is the third of three slide presentations with accompanying audio lectures by Keela Herr, PhD, RN, FAAN, AGSF, of the University of Iowa College of Nursing. 

Dr. Herr was sponsored by The University of Minnesota Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the American Academy of Pain Medicine/Pfizer Visiting Professorship in Pain Medicine to consult with faculty and students and present three formal lectures on the following topics:

  • Pain and Aging
  • Recognizing and Assessing Pain in Cognitively Impaired Older Adults
  • Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults.
Educational objectives: 
  • Recognizing factors impacting pharmacological pain management in older adults.
  • Discuss best practice recommendations for pharmacologic management of persistent pain in older adults.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

The University of Iowa College of Nursing's John A Hartford Foundation Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence's Evidence Based Guidelines

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/30/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Pharmacologic Management of Persistent Pain in Older Adults: Best Practice Recommendations. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Texas Tech Medcast Reynolds Geriatric Step 2CK Test Prep Series 10-11: No. 36--Insulin vs. Autonomy

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

The Step2CK Test Prep Series was created by fourth-year students at the Texas Tech School of Medicine in Lubbock as a project of the fourth-year geriatrics rotation. It was developed as part of the Reynolds Geriatrics Podcast series, which is supported by an Aging and Quality of Life grant from the D.W. Reynolds Foundation. The episodes in this series are based on questions that have geriatrics content and patient vignettes from the 2010 Step 2CK Sample Exam. For more information on the series, go to http://www.ttuhsc.edu/som/fammed/ttmedcast/gerseri....

Educational objectives: 

This episode is based on Question 36 on page 35 of the 2010 Step2CK Sample Exam. Learning Objectives - the third-year medical student studying for the Step2CK exam should be able to:

  • Understand when an AMA (Against Medical Advice) form is necessary
  • Define a legal guardian
  • Know the utility of asking a psychiatrist if a patient is capable of making choices for themselves
  • Explain the medical value of autonomy
  • Understand when to choose the value of autonomy over that of beneficence
Date posted: 
Tue, 08/02/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 01/22/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , and . Texas Tech Medcast Reynolds Geriatric Step 2CK Test Prep Series 10-11: No. 36--Insulin vs. Autonomy. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Driving and the Older Adult

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Sponsors: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Driving and the Older Adult: is one of a continuing series of practical, evidence based, Provider Fact Sheets which summarize key geriatric topics and provide clinically useful assessments and interventions. Initially developed for remote, rural clinical sites, they are useful for students and health care professionals from many fields and across a very broad range of health care settings.

Educational objectives: 

Objectives:

  1. State whether or not patients with dementia can pass a driving road test
  2. List 3 key steps to be taken when evaluating the driving safety of older adults
  3. Look up your state’s laws regarding requirements for reporting unsafe drivers
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Subscribers to POGOe are free to reprint Elder Care on their own stationery or in other publications without obtaining specific permission, so long as

  1. content is not changed,
  2. no one is charged a fee to use or read the publication,
  3. authors and their affiliated institutions are noted without change, and
  4. the reprint includes the following statement: “Reprinted courtesy of the Arizona Reynolds Program of Applied Geriatrics and the Arizona Geriatric Education Center."

Elder Care Provider Sheets can also be accessed at http://www.reynolds.med.arizona.edu/EduProducts/ElderCareProviderSheets.cfm.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
The Elder Care provider sheets are occasionally published in the Arizona Geriatrics Society Journal, which is published twice yearly.
Date posted: 
Fri, 06/30/2017
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/30/2017
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Elder Care: A Resource for Interprofessional Providers: Driving and the Older Adult. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2017 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/209

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