The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

Family Medicine

It Takes a Village: Interprofessional Geriatrics Case Conference

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Residency programs are grappling with the best ways to improve their curriculua to meet the requirements of the Next Accreditation System and ACGME Milestones.  Our review identified NAS requirements that align with established geriatrics care principles (e.g., transitions of care, interprofessional teamwork, managing complex patients, patient / caregiver communication).  Our internal medicine residency program transformed an existing monthly, hour long educational case conference into an an interdisciplinary team-based educational forum emphasizing key geriatrics care and interprofessional principles.  This educational product includes all tools and information necessary for this session to be successfully implemented and evaluated in other institutions.  

Materials and information includes:

  1. Outline / identification of interdisciplinary participants
  2. Forum structure and format 
  3. Content area examples
  4. Learner and curriculum evaluation tool. 

This session provides tools for learners to reach these training goals and requirements while integrating core geriatrics principles through use of team teaching with interprofessional colleagues.  Learners consistently reported an increase in knowledge gained in all targeted milestones with the most dramatic increases in milestones specific to systems-based practice and professionalism.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Integrate interprofessional colleagues into internal medicine residency education in a meaningful forum.
  2. Demonstrate how interprofessional collaboration and communication leads to higyh quality patient care through the use of practical patient cases with evidence to support key points drawn from the literature.
  3. Emphasize core geriatric syndromes and principles that are often overlooked or missed.

 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Please see the attached Instructor's Guide for full implementation details and guidelines for the session.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Abstract/Poster Presentation: Kuester J, Carnahan J, Duthie E, Rehm J, Denson S, Duthie E Jr, Integration of ACGME Milestones into Internal Medicine Residency Curriculum Through Teaching Care Geriatric Principles, American Geriatrics Society Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, 05/2014.

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/01/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/01/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
It Takes a Village: Interprofessional Geriatrics Case Conference. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

A Developmental Approach to Campus-Wide Interprofessional Education: From Exposure to Immersion using a Geriatric Case Study

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

This session will provide health professions students the opportunity to become immersed in a realistic interrprofessional (IP) care planning activity for an older adult.  The primary purpose of this session is to provide a health care specific experiential learning opportunity through which students may better understand the challenges of and develop skills for working with an interprofessional health care team.  The secondary purpose of the session is to provide an opportunity for students to better understand the roles of different health care professions early in their career.

Educational objectives: 

During this small group activity, student participants will:

1. Develop an interprofessional care plan by integrating their own discipline's plan with that of students from other professions.

2. Identify three types of professional competencies: (1) complementary individual professional competencies that are unique to a profession; (2) common clinical competencies that are held by more than one profession; and (3) interprofessional collaborative competencies such as team skills, communication skills, and an understanding of roles and responsibilities.

3. Use the SBAR tool to structure interprofessional communication and communicate essential information to team members about a patient.

4. Improve their orientation toward interprofessional team-based care as compared to multidisciplinary care.

Date posted: 
Tue, 08/18/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 08/18/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
A Developmental Approach to Campus-Wide Interprofessional Education: From Exposure to Immersion using a Geriatric Case Study. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

OSVEs (Objective Structured Video Examinations) may be used to teach principles of effective interdisciplinary team-based transitional care.  First introduced at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the mid-1990s, the OSVEs were used as brief “trigger videos” demonstrating ACGME competencies to which trainees would respond by completing multiple-choice or fill-in-the blank questions.  The Geriatric Transitions OSVE (GT-OSVE) replaces the individual, paper-based exercise with an experiential, team-based exercise focused on transitions of care.  The GT-OSVE also addresses interprofessional (IPE) competencies, including the importance of understanding the roles of other health care professionals.  A series of three GT-OSVE cases was developed with HRSA Geriatric Academic Career Award support (#K01HP20487) to meet an unmet need in care transitions education.  Most existing care transitions educational materials focus on the time of hospital discharge.  The three GT-OSVE cases focus instead on post-hospital transitional care in various settings, including the outpatient primary care clinic, skilled nursing facility and assisted living facility.  The GT-OSVE case presented here (“Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition”) is the first case in this series and addresses the first post-hospital primary care outpatient visit.  The GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” case is a required component of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) rotation for third-year family medicine residents at the University of Utah.  These residents work with clinical pharmacy residents and physician assistant students to complete the GT-OSVE exercise.  The GT-OSVE was designed to be applicable to health professions trainees ranging from novice (e.g. preclinical medical student) to advanced (e.g. senior medical resident), and to be equally relevant to both interdisciplinary teams and teams whose members are all of the same discipline.

Educational objectives: 

Upon completion of this material you will be able to: 

1. Understand best practices in post-hospital transitional care.
2. Acquire practical experience in formulating a high-quality, team-based transitions plan.
3. Discuss the contributions of other health professions trainees in formulating effective transitions.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Order of Resource Files


First, trainees should complete the pretest and self-efficacy survey.


Second, faculty facilitator(s) should consider emailing trainees the links to the online transitions and team functioning modules found in the optional advance preparation assignment document.  This content may be reviewed on each trainee’s own time prior to the didactic session.  The “Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training (GITT)” module is freely available; permission has been granted from the author of the “Transitions of Care:  Leaving the Hospital” module to use this module as an advance preparation assignment for the GT-OSVE.


Third, faculty should deliver the care transitions didactic presentation to trainees prior to the GT-OSVE exercise.  This didactic reinforces and expands upon the care transitions and team leadership content of the optional advance preparation assignment.


Fourth, on the day of the GT-OSVE exercise, faculty should ask each team member to discuss his or her role (e.g. resident, physician assistant, pharmacist, nurse, social worker).  A team leader (not necessarily the medical student or resident) should be identified.   Faculty should review the faculty and team leader instructions and discuss them with the team (see also “Facilitation Schema” below).  Trainees should then be provided with the hypothetical patient chart corresponding with Mr. John Coleman so that they have access to the same information as the resident physician depicted in the video.  Trainees should also be provided with the after-visit summary template that prompts them to consider Coleman’s “four pillars” of transitional care as well as barriers to transitional care.


Fifth, the video file, “Hospital to outpatient care transition,” should be shown.  The team leader should facilitate team discussion and should elicit the contributions of each team member.  After the team discussion, the team leader should present to faculty the transitions plan agreed upon by the team.  The faculty checklist of care transitions and team leadership domains should be used by faculty to help track the extent to which the team leader addresses key care transitions domains and identifies barriers to the transitions plan during his or her presentation of the transitions plan, and also the extent to which the team leader facilitates the transitions plan among the team. Finally, each trainee should complete the post-test and self-efficacy survey.


Practical implementation advice
The GT-OSVE case, “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition,” was designed to ease the scheduling demands often inherent in interdisciplinary education.   Since this GT-OSVE case presents a videotaped encounter with a standardized patient, programs do not need to compensate or schedule standardized patients.  Required materials include a computer with Internet access, PowerPoint slides, and hard copies of ancillary materials including pretest and posttest surveys, faculty and team leader instructions, hypothetical patient chart materials, after-visit summary template and faculty checklist.  Optional materials include the advance preparation assignment and a projector and screen, although the video case can be displayed on a laptop with small groups.  Trainees will require 40 minutes to review the online modules prior to GT-OSVE administration.  Faculty should allow approximately 60 minutes on the day of the GT-OSVE exercise to include the following activities: explanation of the GT-OSVE exercise (10 minutes), viewing of the “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” video case (10 to 15 minutes), team formulation of the transitions plan (10 minutes), presentation of the transitions plan by the team leader to faculty (5 minutes), faculty debrief and team discussion (10 minutes) and completion of the posttest survey (5 minutes).  At least one faculty member must be present to set up the video and hard copy materials, introduce the case and debrief trainees at the end of the session.  Whenever possible, faculty from additional disciplines should participate to enrich the feedback provided to trainees during the debriefing component.  Estimated faculty preparation time includes reviewing the online modules (40 minutes), PowerPoint slides and GT-OSVE case (60 minutes), and hard copy materials (30 minutes).

Strategies to avoid potential pitfalls
We have noticed several potential pitfalls when administering the GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” case.  First, depending on the personality of the trainees involved, one trainee sometimes dominates the team discussion.  In order to ensure that each trainee contributes to the transitions plan equitably, we created the after-visit summary template containing the “four pillars” of effective care transitions as well as a fifth component (barriers to an effective transition).  We ask each trainee to jot down notes on this after-visit summary template as they watch the GT-OSVE with the expectation that the team leader will elicit and integrate the contributions of each trainee.  This approach has reduced the tendency of one team member to dominate the discussion.  Second, we noticed that the 4 minute and 36 second pre-visit planning section section (from 0:00 to 4:36) and the 3 minute and 14 second post-visit planning section of the GT-OSVE “Hospital to Outpatient Care Transition” video (from 12:01-15:15), which depicts a resident physician modeling pre and post-visit planning with a medical assistant and a care manager, can prompt trainees with numerous items to include in the transitions plan.  As a result, we generally reserve the pre and post-visit planning sections of this GT-OSVE case for more novice teams of trainees, such as preclinical medical students, who are less likely than more advanced trainees to be familiar with the medical home setting.  This reduces the length of the video to 9 minutes and 10 seconds (4:37 – 12:00 and 15:16-17:03). Third, we noticed that stopping the video at 12:00 (just after the conversation with Mr. Coleman and his daughter-in-law) works well since, when trainees viewed the end of the clinical encounter (15:16 – 17:03) before discussing the case as a team, they provided feedback that the office visit was over and that parts of the transitions plan had already been presented in the video before they had an opportunity to formulate their own transitions plan.  We now play the last part of the clinical encounter (15:16-17:03) after the trainees present their transition plan.  This approach has worked well since the final segment demonstrates that even a carefully crafted transitions plan might not succeed if the patient is not fully engaged in the plan.  Finally, there may be instances in which more than one trainee from a single discipline is present (e.g. two physician assistant students).  When this occurs, we encourage the “duplicate” trainee to consider attending to aspects of the case they might not often address (e.g. nutritional, psychosocial, or functional issues).  We feel this approach helps increase trainees’ appreciation for the roles of other disciplines, even when trainees from other disciplines are not present, and also demonstrates that team members’ roles can often overlap.


Limitations of the resource and opportunities for improvement
The most important limitation of the GT-OSVE involves its videotaped format.  Although the videotaped standardized patient encounter ensures lack of variability in the case from session to session, we are unable to reproduce the spontaneity of live interactions between trainees and the standardized patient.  However, faculty can rewind the video to replay particularly noteworthy video clips and use this technique as a basis for discussion with their trainees.  The GT-OSVE could also serve as a training video to create a live OSCE session dedicated to care transitions.  We also recognize that the length of time (25 to 30 minutes) allotted for the team members to watch the video, formulate a transitions plan and present to a faculty preceptor may be longer than the time allotted during a real-world post-hospital primary care outpatient visit.  We mention in our faculty debrief to trainees that they may have less time to conduct real-world transitional care visits, and we emphasize that best practices in care transitions taught by the GT-OSVE case can be an organizing principle to help them structure what can otherwise be chaotic office visits following hospital discharge.  We also discuss in our faculty debrief to trainees the importance of other team members’ roles and working as a team to best meet the complex needs of vulnerable older adult patients in a timely fashion.

Permissions for Advance Preparation Assignment Materials

The GITT (Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Team Training) modules are freely available online from the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing.

The online module entitled "Transitions of Care:  Leaving the Hospital" is used with permission from Kathyrn Eubank, MD.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Publications
Farrell T, Brunker C (2015). GT-OSVE: A Method to Teach Effective Interdisciplinary Team-Based Post-Hospital Transitional Care [Web]. MedEdPORTAL Publications.  Available from: https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10129 http://dx.doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10129 - See more at: https://www.mededportal.org/publication/10129#sthash.R35yConZ.dpuf.


Farrell TW, Brunker C, Wong B, Luptak M, Supiano KP (2015). Health professions trainees' satisfaction with the Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE) and self-efficacy in care transitions domains [Abstract]. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 63(S1), S56.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2014). Tools you can use: geriatric structured video examination [Web]. John A. Hartford Foundation. Available from: http://www.jhartfound.org/blog/tools-you-can-use-geriatric-transitions-objective-structured-video-examination/


Presentations
Farrell TW. Health professions trainees' satisfaction with the Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE) and self-efficacy in care transitions domains. American Geriatrics Society 2015 Annual Scientific Meeting, National Harbor, MD.


Farrell TW, Brunker CP, Supiano KP (2015). The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE): an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and assessing best practices in transitional care. University of Utah Division of Geriatics: Research in Progress series.


Farrell TW and Brunker CB (2014). The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE): an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and assessing best practices in transitional care. Society for Social Work Leadership in Health Care (SSWLHC) 49th Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW (2014). Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). Department of Veterans Affairs National GEC Leads Virtual Conference.


Farrell TW and Brunker CB (2014). Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). HRSA Geriatric Academic Career Award: Quarterly Technical Assistance Call.


Farrell TW (2014).  Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit.


Luther B, Farrell TW, Wilson R (2014). Innovative methods of developing interprofessional education. University of Utah College of Nursing Care Management Workshop: Developing Skills of Change. Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW. Objective structured video examinations (OSVEs) focused on transitions of care. Presented at Education Product Showcase, American Geriatrics Society 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting. Grapevine, TX.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2013). Geriatric transitions objective structured video examination (OSVE). Marketplace II session, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation 11th Annual Grantee Meeting. Coronado, CA.


Farrell TW, Brunker CB (2012). Geriatric transitions objective structured video examination (OSVE). Presented at Marketplace I session, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation 10th Annual Meeting. St. Louis, MO.


Farrell TW (2012). Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit. Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW (2012).  Geriatrics Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  John A. Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence annual site visit.  Salt Lake City, UT.


Farrell TW and Nagoshi M (2012).  Interprofessional education products developed by the University of Utah and the University of Hawaii. 'Geri-West' consortium conference call.


Citations
US Department of Health and Human Services.  Multiple chronic conditions resource summary:  Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE).  Available at:  http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/mcc/educational...

 

 

 

 

Date posted: 
Thu, 10/06/2016
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 10/06/2016
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Each user is asked to indicate his or her name, degree, academic title, name of institution or organization, contact information, purpose for using OSVE videos, and disciplines of those using the videos.
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
The Geriatric Transitions Objective Structured Video Examination (GT-OSVE). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2016 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Multimorbidity Toolkit

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

In July 2012, the AGS published the Guiding Principles for the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity: An Approach for Clinicians to address the many challenges in providing optimal care for frail older adults with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity. The Guiding Principles outline an approach to managing patients with multimorbidity, one that is built on a firm understanding of the principles of evidence-based medicine, patient preferences and goals of care, clinically feasible methods for understanding prognosis, and the multi-factorial geriatric issues and syndromes that may be consequences of the combinations of diseases and conditions (e.g., polypharmacy).

The AGS has developed the Multimorbidity Toolkit with funding support from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). This Toolkit is meant to be used as a resource in understanding the Guiding Principles for the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity, and as a reference for clinicians in managing patients with multimorbidity.

Educational objectives: 

The learning objectives for this activity have been designed to address participant knowledge, competence, performance, and patient outcomes. At the conclusion of this program, participants should be able to:

  • Describe principles in applying clinical guidelines to patients with multimorbidity;
  • Discuss strategies for applying these principles in a clinical setting;
  • Identify barriers to the clinical application of these guiding principles and discuss solutions for overcoming these barriers.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Check out this associated product: Multiple Chronic Conditions: Geriatrics Evaluation and Management Strategies (MCC GEMS) App at http://pogoe.org/productid/21842  

Date posted: 
Thu, 06/11/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 06/11/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Multimorbidity Toolkit. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Multiple Chronic Conditions: Geriatrics Evaluation and Management Strategies (MCC GEMS) App

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
0
Abstract: 

With a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has developed the Multiple Chronic Conditions: Geriatrics Evaluation and Management Strategies App (MCC GEMS) to address one of the greatest challenges in clinical care of older adults: providing optimal care for frail elders with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity. 

Educational objectives: 

The MCC GEMS App will help guide the clinician through an approach to managing patients with multimorbidity, one that is built on a firm understanding of the principles of evidence-based medicine, patient preferences and goals of care, clinically feasible methods for understanding prognosis, and the multi-factorial geriatric issues and syndromes that may be consequences of the combinations of diseases and conditions (e.g., polypharmacy). This Approach is based on the AGS’s Guiding Principles for the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity: An Approach for Clinicians.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Login to www.GeriatricsCareOnline.org to view the accompanying online educational toolkit http://geriatricscareonline.org/toc/multimorbidity-toolkit/TK011.

Date posted: 
Thu, 06/11/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Thu, 06/11/2015
Product Viewing Instructions: 
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Multiple Chronic Conditions: Geriatrics Evaluation and Management Strategies (MCC GEMS) App. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

2015 Quick Reference App: Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Resident Geriatric Competencies

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Abstract: 

In 2010, the essential geriatric competencies for Internal Medicine (IM) and Family Medicine (FM) residents were published. To reinforce and disseminate these critical skills, we created a quick reference mobile application for IM and FM residents that addresses competencies in each of the seven key competency domains: Medication Management; Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Health; Complex or Chronic Illness; Palliative and End-of-Life Care; Hospital Patient Safety; Transitions of Care; and Ambulatory Care.

This application can be used as a comprehensive reference by learners of multiple levels and disciplines while caring for patients in a variety of settings, including inpatient wards, outpatient clinic, nursing homes and home visits. Various screening tools, criteria, mnemonics and guidelines supporting each competency are included in this concise guide to caring for aging adults.

To access the free app:

  1. Go to Geriatrics Quick Reference App on AgileMD
  2. Create a free AgileMD account  
  3. Download the free AgileMD application using your smartphone app store 
  4. Open the AgileMD app and login with the username and password you created
Educational objectives: 
After using this quick reference tool, learners will be able to:
1.) Select and apply evidence-based tools to screen for or assess geriatric syndromes.
2.) Asses for and manage issues affecting older adult health across seven key competency domains: Medication Management; Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Health; Complex or Chronic Illness; Palliative and End-of-Life Care; Hospital Patient Safety; Transitions of Care; and Ambulatory Care.
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

AGS 2015 Educational Showcase Product Swap

Date posted: 
Mon, 09/28/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 04/03/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
2015 Quick Reference App: Internal Medicine and Family Medicine Resident Geriatric Competencies. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Ethnogeriatrics: Language Translation Podcast

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is a podcast discussion on language translation that took place at the 2014 American Geriatric Society Annual Scientific Meeting in the Ethnogeriatrics Special Interest Group meeting.

Educational objectives: 

To provide instruction on the following two competencies:

1.  Demonstrate interviewing skills which promote culturally appropriate decision-making and mutual respect between health care providers and ethnic clients and their families in patient centered care through out the continuum of their lives, including end of life care.

2.  Communicate effectively and elicit information from elders of any ethnic background and their families, particularly those who speak little or no English, with appropriate use of interpreter services and information technology.

Date posted: 
Wed, 09/09/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 09/09/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Ethnogeriatrics: Language Translation Podcast. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Diabetes Management in Long Term Care

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Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Guidelines for managing diabetes in older adults and particularly the long-term care population have changed significantly over recent years.  Changes have included redefining HbA1c goals based on patient comorbidities and function.  Additional emphasis has been placed on discontinuing the use of sliding scale insulin in the long-term care population.  The current guidelines are reviewed, and a practical approach to the day-to-day management of diabetes in long-term care is outlined.

Educational objectives: 

1. To review recommended HbA1c goals determined by patient comorbidities.

2. To review recommendations regarding the use of sliding scale insulin in LTC patients.

3. To outline a practical approach to the day-to-day management of diabetes in the long-term care setting.

Date posted: 
Tue, 05/26/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Sun, 04/01/2018
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Diabetes Management in Long Term Care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

Patient Complexity and Interprofessional Team Care

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Patient Complexity and Interprofessional Team Care is a geriatrics block rotation mini-course designed to improve medicine trainee’s understanding of health care teams.  It was developed in the setting of a new model of care collaboration for vulnerable seniors, Geriatric Resources for Assessment and Care of Elders.  The course is a blended curriculum offered during a 4-week residency block rotation in geriatrics. It is composed of a web-based, audio, PowerPoint lecture to introduce the Minnesota Complexity Assessment Method (MCAM) tool and application of the tool using paper cases.  The tool is then applied to actual patients discussed at an interprofessional team meeting of the GRACE care management program.

Educational objectives: 

Given a screening of the patient medical record, attendance at the patient’s GRACE interprofessional team meeting and completion of the Minnesota Complexity Assessment Method (MCAM) tool, the health professional trainee will identify patient situation complexity and describe ways that interprofessional team care members address patient care.

Given a printed Likert scale questionnaire, the resident will indicate positive change in degree of agreement with beliefs about interprofessional teams.

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 
Educational Strategies for Addressing Complex Patient Care Symposium
Aida Wen, MD, Todd James, MD, Miho Bautista, MD
October 21, 2013, 2013 Reynolds Grantee 11th Annual Meeting  in Coronado, CA

 

“Beliefs of Medicine Residents Regarding Interdisciplinary Teams,”  Poster presentation American Geriatrics Society Scientific Meeting, Grapevine, TX, May 2-5, 2013

Citation:  James, TC, Westmoreland, GR, Counsell SR. Beliefs of Medicine Residents Regarding Interdisciplinary Teams. J Am Geriatr Soc 2013; 61: Suppl s1; s157 (abstr C87).  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.122...

 

The poster described the 12-item physician survey to assess post-graduate medicine resident beliefs regarding interdisciplinary teams.  Resident responses demonstrated that interdisciplinary team participation is perceived as worthwhile. Yet, residents were uncertain about when their patient needed a team. There was significant agreement for having physicians as leaders of teams, and yet there was not clear agreement on team goals. Survey results support development of curricula for medicine residents geared toward teaching when a team approach is indicated and clarifying roles of various team members.

 

“Complexity and Interdisciplinary Team Care” Curriculum Presentation at Reynolds Grantee 9th Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, October 23 – 26, 2012

 

“Using a Complexity Tool with Geriatric Patients Teaches Residents Roles of Interprofessional Teams,” Buzz Session Presentation, InterProfessional Care for the 21st Century: Redefining Education and Care conference, Jefferson InterProfessional Education Center, Philadelphia, PA, May 18 – 19, 2012

 

“A New Strategy for Teaching Residents Roles of Interprofessional Teams” Poster Presentation at American Geriatrics Society Scientific Meeting, Seattle, WA, May 3 – 5, 2012.

Citation: James TC, Westmoreland GR, Arenson S, Counsell SR. A New Strategy for Teaching Residents Roles of Interprofessional Teams. .  J Am Geriatr Soc 2012; 60: Suppl s4;  s45 (abstr A84). http://www.americangeriatrics.org/files/documents/...

 

 “Academic Roles and Scholarly Activities” presentation, Faculty Forum, Indiana University Geriatrics, Indianapolis, IN, January 23, 2012

 

“Pilot Testing of a New Curriculum on Patient Complexity and Interdisciplinary Team Care” Poster Presentation at Collaborating Across Borders III, Tuscon, AZ, November 19 – 21, 2011.

 

 

 

Date posted: 
Wed, 04/03/2019
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 04/03/2019
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Patient Complexity and Interprofessional Team Care. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2019 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

"The Psychologist's Role in Assessment and Therapy"

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This resident education module was developed to educate residents on what other team members do.  The content was organized around the IM-FM geriatric competencies and IM Milestones.  This focus of this module is to explain the psychologist's role in assessment and therapy.

Educational objectives: 
1.Contrast skills/approaches of psychologists from those of other mental health professionals
2.Describe psychologist’s role in evaluating persons with cognitive, emotional, functional problems
3.List mental health problems and adjustment difficulties for which psychologists can be therapeutically helpful
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

This module was showcased at the 2014 Reynolds Grantee Meeting marketplace.

Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
"The Psychologist's Role in Assessment and Therapy". POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/201

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