The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences The Pritzker School of Medicine

Is this a Reynold's grantee: 
Yes

Advance Care Planning Curriculum

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

Advance care planning (ACP) is a critical component of quality end-of-life care, yet there is little formal training in medical school education.  This novel curriculum enables third-year medical students to practice communication skills and build confidence interviewing a patient about advance care planning, personal values and quality of life.  The curriculum consists of: a lecture, readings, demonstration video, and a mock interview with a senior “trained patient.”  Senior, volunteers were recruited from an independent senior building that is part of a retirement community.  "Trained patients" participate in a 1.5-hour training session preparing them for the interview and to evaluate students' clinical interviewing skills. Following the interview, students receive verbal feedback and written assessment of their skills from trained patients. Students also complete a self-assessment of skills survey, attend a debriefing session with faculty, and write a 250-word reflective essay about the encounter.  The Advance Care Planning online module developed by University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, POGOe product #19059, is a recommended component.

Educational objectives: 

After completing this curriculum, learners should be able to:

1. Define and differentiate among types of code status, health care proxies, and advance directives in Illinois.

2. Utilize effective communication techniques in completing an advance directive discussion with a patient.

3. Identify own biases and attitudes toward advance care planning.

Date posted: 
Mon, 09/29/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 09/29/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Advance Care Planning Curriculum. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

Self-Directed Learning Assignment on Cancer Screening in Older Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This self-directed learning assignment was created to complement the required 2-week ambulatory geriatrics curriculum for PGY1’s at the University of Chicago.  Learners are first asked to reflect on a previous patient encounter during which they struggled whether to recommend routine cancer screening.  Then they complete a required reading assignment.  Next, they are asked to choose a patient from their own continuity clinic panel and a type of cancer screening, and assess whether this would be appropriate for the particular patient based on their age, life expectancy, preferences, and goals of care.  They are also asked to elaborate on the benefits and risks of screening.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Learn what the cancer screening guideline recommendations are for colon, breast, and cervical cancer
  2. Learn how to estimate an older patient’s life expectancy
  3. Appreciate the benefits and risks of routine cancer screening
  4. Incorporate patient’s preference and goals of care into whether or not to recommend cancer screening in older patients
  5. Appreciate the challenges of recommending cancer screening in older patients
Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Walter LC and Covinsky KE. JAMA 2001;285(21):2750-6.

Date posted: 
Tue, 02/24/2015
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 02/24/2015
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Self-Directed Learning Assignment on Cancer Screening in Older Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2015 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

Decision-making in Multimorbid Patients

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This workshop is designed to introduce learners (medical students or residents) to the concept of multimorbidity and an approach to decision-making in this patient population based on the American Geriatrics Society’s Guiding Principles for the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity. The workshop has been delivered to groups ranging in size from 20-80 participants and can be delivered in a single 60-90 minute session or spread over two 45 minute sessions. The basic format includes a large group didactic lecture as introduction, small group breakout session to work through multimorbid patient cases, and a large group wrap-up to discuss and review key points. It has been successfully implemented with second year medical students about to transition to their clinical clerkships as well as academic and community hospital internal medicine residents.

Educational objectives: 

After completing this workshop, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of multimorbidity on the US health care system
  • Practice a 5 step approach to multimorbid patients
    • Elicit patient preferences
    • Consider evidence-based treatment options
    • Estimate prognosis
    • Determine clinical feasibility
    • Prioritize plan
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

None

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

None

Date posted: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 10/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . Decision-making in Multimorbid Patients. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

Interprofessional Team Encounter: Skills Self-Assessment and Reflective Writing Assignment for Internal Medicine Residents

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

Designed to pair with an interprofessional team encounter, this is a pre/post skills self-assessment and a reflective writing assignment documenting lessons learned about interprofessional team work by internal medicine residents during a geriatrics rotation. The assignment consists of observing an interprofessional team encounter with an APN, SW, PT, chaplain or pharmacist in a clinical setting which may include an outpatient clinic, inpatient consult service, hospice, nursing home or outpatient physical therapy. The pre/post skills self-assessment is linked to AAMC resident milestones for interprofessional team work. Residents' reflective writing assignments are included in their residency portfolios as documentation towards meeting an Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA).

 

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This educational module is designed so that interprofessional team members do not require additional training or special instructions to participate.

Date posted: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 08/27/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Interprofessional Team Encounter: Skills Self-Assessment and Reflective Writing Assignment for Internal Medicine Residents. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

Introduction to Geriatric Assessments: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS2

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

"Introduction to Geriatric Assessments" teaches second year medical students the fundamentals of a geriatric assessment through a 45 min. lecture and 6 simulated patient encounters followed by a 360 degree evaluation by student, preceptor and simulated patient (SP). The SP encounters involve administering common geriatric screening tests and address: depression (GDS), communicating with a caregiver (dementia), assessing physical function (gait assessment), assessing cognition (MMSE), health literacy and initiating an advance directives discussion. Students' clinical skills and discreet interviewing skills are assessed. Materials provided here include: a facilitator's guide, lecture slides with speaker's notes, a pocket reference card, and SP case information and instructions, door charts and evaluation instruments corresponding to each patient case. 

The Case Instructions are available to verified faculty members upon request according to our Restricted Access Policy. If interested, please send an email toEditor@POGOe.org.

Educational objectives: 

Following "Introduction to Geriatric Assessments," second year medical students will be able to:

  1. recognize and utilize screening tools for the assessment of common geriatric syndromes.
  2. demonstrate appropriate communication skills for interviewing a geriatric patient and/or caregiver. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This curriculum is part of  GATE ("Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments"), a longitudinal, competency-based curriculum for medical students, and was piloted in 2010 at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. The M1 curriculum teaches students how to obtain a functional history and understand independent living and assisted living environments. The M3 curriculum addresses geriatric care in the hospital, and M4 training examines care in the nursing home setting. GATE includes a comprehensive and integrated evaluation process measuring knowledge, attitudes and skills. GATE for M3 and M4 incorporates supplemental materials available on POGOe and developed by other Reynolds grantee institutions.

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , and . Introduction to Geriatric Assessments: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS2. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

Obtaining a Functional History: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS 1

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

"Obtaining a Functional History" is a curriculum for first year medical students consisting of a 1.5 hr didactic session on geriatric history-taking and includes a visit by an older adult community member who fields questions about his/her life story. Following the lecture, pairs of students visit an assigned "trained patient" living in an independent senior building that is part of a retirement community. The students conduct a geriatric functional history and home safety assessment (1.5 hrs.). (Volunteer "trained patients" were recruited for this project and participated in a 2 hr. training session to prepare them for this role. Sample training packet, training video and user's guide are included.) Students' interviewing skills are rated by "trained patients" and oral feedback is given to them as well. Students also complete a knowledge test and attitudes assessment pre and post-course, and write a 250 word reflective essay about their interviewing experience. Materials provided here include:  the lecture with speaker's notes, pre and post-tests, geriatric history-taking form, "trained patient" evaluation, and a sample "trained patient" training materials. An answer key is available upon request from Editor@POGOe.org.

Educational objectives: 

"Obtaining a Functional History"  addresses the AAMC Competencies below and teaches first year medical students how to:

1.  Assess and describe baseline and current functinal abilities (instumental activities of daily living, activities of daily living, and special senses) in an older paitent by collecting historical data from multiple sources and performing a confirmatory physical examination. (AAMC Competency #9)

2. Identify and assess safety risks in the home environment, and make recommendations to mitigate these. (AAMC Competency #11)

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

To provide students the opportunity to interview geriatric trained patients, arrangements were made with a local retirement community granting permission for independent senior to be recruited for this voluntary, medical student education training program. Residents participated in an on-site, 2-hour training session, led by the authors/geriatricians, on how to evaluate students' interviewing skills. A sample training packet is provided.

Piloted in Spring 2011 at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, GATE ("Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments") is a longitudinal, competency-based curriculum for medical students. The M2 curriculum is an introduction to geriatric assessments; the M3 curriculum addresses geriatric care in the hospital; and M4 training examines care in the nursing home setting.  GATE includes a comprehensive and integrated evaluation process measuring knowledge, attitudes and skills. Supplemental materials developed by other Reynolds grantee institutions and available on POGOe are incorporated in the GATE M3 and M4 curricula.

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Obtaining a Functional History: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS 1. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

PATCH (Palliative Access Through Care at Home) Match: Virtual Training in Geriatric Palliative Home Visits

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

PATCH Match is a competency-based, virtual training experience in geriatric palliative home care, accessible online and suitable for a wide range of health care professionals such as medical and nursing students, residents, fellows, and others. Through simulated home visits, PATCH Match aims to teach learners to recognize that visiting frail older adults in their homes provides a more comprehensive understanding of patients, and that palliative care can be delivered effectively on home visits. Learners visit up to 4 homebound elderly patients, and face decisions about assessment and treatment relating to issues in: dementia with acute agitation, dementia with pain, falls at home, and transitions of care (from hospital to home). 

Educational objectives: 

After "visiting" the PATIENT WITH DEMENTIA AND PAIN, learners should be able to:

  1. recognize atypical ways in which pain may present in patients with advanced dementia,
  2. assess pain in patients with advanced dementia,
  3. identify options for pain treatment in patients with advanced dementia, and
  4. discuss the caregivers' role in caring for patients with advanced dementia and pain.

After "visiting" the PATIENT WITH DEMENTIA AND AGITATION, learners should be able to:

  1. recognize that agitation can be a symptom of emotional or physical distress in patients with advanced dementia,
  2. explain how the environment can have a positive or negative effect on agitated patients with dementia,
  3. describe behavioral and communication strategies for managing agitation in patients with dementia.

After "visiting" the PATIENT WITH RECENT FALLS, learners should be able to:

  1. report common causes of falls at home,
  2. name components of a falls risk assessment,
  3. recognize that most falls are the result of multi-factorial causes,
  4. explain how medications may contribute significantly to falls, and
  5. identify strategies for falls prevention that maximize patients' function and minimize injury.

After "visiting" the patient recently discharged from the hospital (TRANSITION OF CARE), learners should be able to:

  1. recognize problems that occur in the transition from hospital discharge to home relating to medication use and communication about hospital care and follow up,
  2. explain the teach-back method of communicating with patients and families, and
  3. discuss how a multi-disciplinary team and social support system may be engaged during transitions from hospital to home
Date posted: 
Fri, 11/12/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 11/12/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . PATCH (Palliative Access Through Care at Home) Match: Virtual Training in Geriatric Palliative Home Visits. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

"It burns!" -- Assessment and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This self-directed learning exercise explores the assessment and management of neuropathic pain.  Through a case presentation and related readings, the student will identify appropriate strategies for assessing and treating common sources of neuropathic pain.  Knowledge questions are included to assess learner understanding.  A brief follow up discussion to go over answers to multiple choice questions is recommended. A workbook is provided. Some external materials are required; see the instructions below.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Recognize common presentations and symptoms of neuropathic pain
  2. Understand basic pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuropathic pain
  3. Identify chronic medical diagnoses associated with neuropathic pain
  4. Discuss the most effective therapies available for this type of pain
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

In order to complete this module, you will also need to access the following:

  • Article Jackson KC. Pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain. Pain Practice 2006;6(1):27-33.
  • Web module “Pathophysiology of Nociceptive and Neuropathic Pain” from the American Medical Association.
  • The answer key for this product will be provided to faculty members only. To request the answer key, send an email to Editor@POGOe.org titled "Request for Answer Key to Product #20723". Include your full name, your institution, your intended use of the product and any additional information relevant to the request. Also include your supervisor's full name, email address and phone number so that we may confirm your status as a faculty member.

This product is part of a series of 3 independent learning modules on pain for medical students.  Companion products:  Treating pain in persons with a history of addictions (#20723), and Addressing myths and managing side effects of opioid (#20724).  The workbook for this series can also be accessed at  http://champ.bsd.uchicago.edu/painControl/index.html

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 01/23/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 01/23/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
and . "It burns!" -- Assessment and Treatment of Neuropathic Pain. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

"I don't want my mother to take that!" -- Addressing myths and concerns and managing side effects of opioid medications

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This self-directed learning exercise explores common myths and misconceptions that patients, family members, and providers have regarding the use of opioids for pain. Through an unfolding case, the learner will identify ways to address these concerns and anticipate and treat common side effects of opioid medications. Multiple choice questions are included, and a brief follow up meeting with an instructor is recommended to go over the questions. A workbook is provided. Some external materials are required; see the instructions below.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Discuss common barriers to adequate pain management
  2. Describe common side effects of opioids and their treatment
  3. Demonstrate effective communication with patients and families to illicit and address concerns about opioids
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

In order to complete this module, you will also need to access the following:

  • Article Swegle JM and Logemann C. Management of common opioid-induced adverse effects. Amer Fam Phys 2006;74(8):1347-1354
  • Fast Fact "Why Patients Do Not Take Their Opioids, 2nd ed" from EPERC
  • The answer key for this product will be provided to faculty members only. To request the answer key, send an email to Editor@POGOe.org titled "Request for Answer Key to Product #20723". Include your full name, your institution, your intended use of the product and any additional information relevant to the request. Also include your supervisor's full name, email address and phone number so that we may confirm your status as a faculty member.

This product is part of a series of 3 independent learning modules on pain for medical students.  Companion products are "Assessment and treatment of neuropathic pain" (#20725) and "Treatment of Pain in Persons with a History of Addictions" (#20723). The workbook for this series can also be accessed at http://champ.bsd.uchicago.edu/painControl/index.html

Date posted: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
"I don't want my mother to take that!" -- Addressing myths and concerns and managing side effects of opioid medications. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

"Can you help me out doc?" - Treatment of Pain in Persons with a History of Addictions

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This self-directed learning exercise explores the approach to pain management in terminally ill patients with a history of substance abuse.  Through a video case presentation and related readings, the learners will identify challenges and optimal strategies for caring for this special population.  Four to five multiple choice test questions are included in this module.  A brief review and follow up with an instructor is recommended to go over the answers. A workbook is provided. Some external materials are required; see the instructions below.

Educational objectives: 

After completion of this module the student should be able to:

  1. Define addiction, physical dependence, pseudoaddiction, and tolerance
  2. Describe basic principles for prescribing controlled substances to patients with advanced illness and issues of addiction
  3. Recommend appropriate guidelines for clinical management of terminally ill patients with addiction
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

In order to complete this module, you will also need to access the following:

  • Video "Pain Management for a Patient with a History of Substance Abuse" from The Center for Palliative Care Education
  • Article Kirsh KL and Passik SD. Palliative care of the terminally ill drug addict. Cancer Investigation 2006;24:425-431.
  • The answer key for this product will be provided to faculty members only. To request the answer key, send an email to Editor@POGOe.org titled "Request for Answer Key to Product #20723". Include your full name, your institution, your intended use of the product and any additional information relevant to the request. Also include your supervisor's full name, email address and phone number so that we may confirm your status as a faculty member.

This product is part of a series of 3 independent learning modules on pain for medical students and other learners.  Companion products are "Addressing myths and managing side effects of opioid medications" (#20724) and "Assessment and treatment of neuropathic pain" (#20725).   The workbook for this series can also be accessed at http://champ.bsd.uchicago.edu/painControl/index.html

Date posted: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Wed, 12/08/2010
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
"Can you help me out doc?" - Treatment of Pain in Persons with a History of Addictions. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2010 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/1204

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