The Portal of Geriatrics Online Education

11 SCC: Identify safety risks in home

11. Identify and assess safety risks in the home environment, and make recommendations to mitigate these.

Interprofessional Team Care Symposium for Medical Students

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

The successful medical care of adults with multiple medical, functional and social problems requires the expertise of multiple health disciplines working together effectively. Physicians must be aware of the skills of the interprofessional health disciplines and learn how to work effectively in teams. This product describes a two hour, interactive intensive introduction to the training and roles of the interprofessional health care team members taught by faculty from nursing, physical therapy, occupation therapy, speech therapy, pharmacy, audiology, nutrition, social work and medicine. The format is a fast moving, interactive health team fair based on a case of an older adult recovering from a stroke. 

After a brief introduction and review of the stroke case, medical students in groups of 5-8 move from station to station in 10-15 minute intervals. At each station, faculty from a health care discipline describe their educational background and discuss how they will assist the students to manage the stroke case. At the last station students receive a case summary and a packet of descriptions summarizing each of the health care disciplines. 

 

Educational objectives: 

Participating medical students will be able to:

  1. Describe the training required to enter eight different health professions.
  2. List one or more clinical problems that might benefit from collaboration with eight different health professions.
  3. Apply the knowledge of the clinical skills of other health disciplines to provide care to an older adult recovering from a stroke.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This curriculum requires:

Recruitment of teaching faculty from allied health colleges or hospital departments.

A large, open space, such as might be used for a research poster session (e.g., large entry hall way) or multiple small classrooms that are close to each other as might be used for medical student small gorup learning communities.

Two hours of curriculum time for 50-80 students; for larger class sizes the session will need to be repeated two or three times to accomodate everyone.

Date posted: 
Tue, 07/15/2014
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 07/15/2014
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, and . Interprofessional Team Care Symposium for Medical Students. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2014 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Standardized Interdisciplinary Team Meeting Case

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This Standardized Interdisciplinary Team Meeting scenario was developed as part of a multi-station, standardized patient assessment. The student’s performance is measured by checklists filled out by the standardized team members and by the evaluation of responses to written questions on the interstation exercise. It is designed to be the second of two consecutive stations used to assess interdisciplinary team skills. The case materials for the first station (Ted Lee) are described separately. In this station the student must meet with Leslie Mitchell, Medical Social Worker and Jamie Jones, RN for an interdisciplinary team meeting. The social worker believes that the best disposition is for the patient to be sent to an SNF Rehabilitation Unit for further physical and occupational therapy. The nurse believes that Mr. Lee will refuse to go to an SNF facility because he perceives it to be a nursing home and recommends that the patient be kept in the hospital until he is strong enough to go home with home care physical therapy. The student’s task is to help the team create a discharge plan for Mr. Lee.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  1. Actively participate in an interdisciplinary team meeting.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

See the first of two consecutive stations used to assess interdisciplinary team skills at Standardized Patient: Ted Lee.

Date posted: 
Fri, 07/12/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 07/12/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , and . Standardized Interdisciplinary Team Meeting Case. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 67

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

Caring Across the Continuum: An Aging Virtual Patient Series.  Case One: Mrs. Porter Age 67 - Introduction to Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment. This case, the first in a four-part series about the virtual patient, Mrs. Porter, highlights the main components of a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA), set in an outpatient ambulatory setting. Mrs. Porter, age 67 in this case, is visiting Dr. Pat for the first time. Dr. Pat conducts a thorough social, physical and mental evaluation of Mrs. Porter. The skill of active listening is illustrated to emphasize the importance of taking a thorough patient history during the CGA. The Geriatric Gems in the case provide in-depth information and resources about a variety of geriatric health topics. The Gems in Case One include Smoking and Older Adults; Geriatric Functional Assessment; Immunization Guidelines for Older Adults; Elder Abuse and Mistreatment; Falls; and, Incontinence. The case concludes with a critical thinking activity inviting the learner to discuss the major differences between a CGA and standard adult medical exam. 

Educational objectives: 

On completion of Case One: Mrs. Porter Age 67, students will be able to:

  1. Define and describe select components of a comprehensive geriatric assessment
  2. Describe the differences between a routine medical evaluation and an evaluation of an older adult
  3. Summarize concepts presented within the case through descriptive patient study
  4. Address the following Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) geriatric competencies:
    1. Assess falls, balance, and gait of the virtual patient
    2. Assess functional abilities.
  5. Generate a problem list and recommendations for Mrs. Porter
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

This product is one part of a short series consisting of the following products:

As an innovative, virtual learning series, this web-based series of cases spans the 21-year relationship of care between geriatrician Dr. Patricia Thompson and her patient, Mrs. Alice Porter. This virtual learning experience for medical students, based on the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) competencies, is designed to pique interest and enhance knowledge and skills in the care of older adults. The web-based learning environment provides students the unique opportunity to observe and interact with Mrs. Porter, in an ongoing doctor-patient relationship, outside of the traditional classroom setting. The series exposes students to the importance of continuity of patient care, since each case correlates to a different year of medical school education. As the medical student advances in their curriculum, Mrs. Porter continues to age, requiring more complex care and further application of critical thinking skills from the student. Each case has a unique focus that targets key geriatric and/or palliative concepts appropriate to the level of the student that can easily be embedded into existing medical school courses.

The virtual cases allow students to explore approaches to the patient; observe model clinician-patient interactions; choose practice techniques; offer health promotion, palliative counseling, and patient counseling; and contemplate complex ethical decisions regarding the care of the patient in an innocuous, self-paced, virtual environment. The embedded natural language system in each case offers an opportunity to pose real-world questions and problems to the learner, with the goal of eliciting critical thinking skills and reflective learning.

The series offers a readily available complementary assignment to the classroom and clinical experience. The self-paced case studies contain video animation, an interactive electronic medical record, Geriatric Gems and Palliative Pearls, natural language style critical thinking, clinical reasoning and clinical judgment learning activities, and evidence-based expert explanations. Evaluative tools include a pre and post quiz and rubric-scored natural language short answer and essay questions. The natural language system provides hints to the students and evaluates their responses based on the information they provide. Student actions and choices are captured for formative evaluation, as well as to provide student feedback.

The virtual patient system is a web-based application that runs on Windows Server, running IIS with ASP enabled within IIS. The project database is Microsoft Access.

The first time you explore a case, you will need to register. There is a "Register" button at the bottom of the login form. Click this button to register or to have your password sent to the email address you entered when you registered.

On the popup registration form, you will need to enter an ID and a password. Your ID can be anything you wish. You can use the same User ID and password for any of the four cases. All of the other fields are optional. (The email field is optional. If you don't enter an email address when you register, the system can't send you your password and/or ID if you forget them.)

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Using a Virtual Patient to Teach the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment to Medical Students. Poster presented February 24, 2012 at the AGHE Annual Meeting and Educational Leadership Conference.

Instructional Design and Management of a Virtual World: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Project Demonstration presented February 3, 2011 at The University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education Interprofessional Health Science Education Conference.

Instructional Design and Management in a Virtual Environment: A Second Life for Geriatric Education. Presented October 25, 2010 at the Ninth Annual Reynolds Grantee Meeting.

Date posted: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 02/15/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Caring Across the Continuum: Mrs. Porter Age 67. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Intended Learner Audiences: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
999
Abstract: 

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home Flexible Clinical Experience is a weeklong elective rotation for the third year medical student and offers an introduction to the care of the older adult provided at home and along the trajectory of disease from health care maintenance and prevention to end-of-life. Medical students are scheduled for home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. Students also experience a home visit with elder protective services and other members of the inter-professional home care team. In addition, students spend time with a palliative care physician and make home visits with hospice staff. The students receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care and are required to complete independent learning assignments. Students receive feedback from the inter-professional team, nurse practitioners and attending physicians on knowledge and professionalism.

Educational objectives: 

On completion, the learner will be able to:

  • Identify the role of interprofessional staff in the care of an elderly patient at home
  • Describe the role of elder protective services in the community
  • Perform and document an assessment of fall risk and safety evaluation in the home
  • Demonstrate medication reconciliation with home medications
  • Explain the roles of palliative care and hospice in caring for frail older adults
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Flexible Clinical Experience Program

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home experience was developed within the framework of the new MS3 Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, first implemented in the current academic year (2012-2013). Students are required to select 4 FCE courses from approximately 80 faculty-designed experiences. These one to two week electives emphasize one-on-one interaction between the student and teacher. The methods employed include working in the inpatient and outpatient settings under supervision of physicians, oral and written case presentations, and education in specialized testing procedures used in the specialty.

The following list of overall program objectives provides course design flexibility while maintaining curricula continuity.

  • Allow for career exploration and or development, and planning for senior study
  • Allow exposure to evolving and cutting-edge branches of medicine, and to the growing importance of coordinated, patient-centered care models
  • Provide an opportunity to work with recognized experts in different fields of medicine and allied sciences
  • Provide exposure to novel concepts or systems of care not normally available within the core clinical experience
  • Allow for student designed innovative experiences within the guidelines for this elective

FCE Educational Methodologies & Student Assessment (background)

The Care of the Older Adult in the Home FCE provides the third year medical student the opportunity to experience care provided by multiple team members. Students are scheduled to participate in home visits with a geriatrician and geriatric nurse practitioner. They also are scheduled to go on home visits with additional members of the inter-professional team, such as physical therapy or a visiting nurse. The FCE includes time with a palliative care physician and going on home visits with members of the hospice team. In addition, students go on a home visit with elder protective services. Students are given a reading list and independent assignments, including a reflective essay. They receive didactics on home care and end-of-life care. Assessment criteria are based on attendance, case history and presentations, participation in home visits and didactics, feedback from inter-professional team and attending physicians on competence, knowledge, and professionalism.

***********

Included Documents

Course Description

The course description is formatted as a Flexible Clinical Experience (FCE) course handout for students to download for their portfolios. All FCEs include supervisor (preceptor), sponsoring department, description of activities, learning objectives, assessment and evaluation methods, and offered dates.

Independent Learning Assignments

The assignments list is the self-directed component for the experience.

SAMPLE Schedule

The student schedule is dependent on the resources (professionals and facilities) that are available during particular terms through the academic year. An actual schedule for one student, this sample demonstrates the variety of exposures for the student.

 

Date posted: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 01/11/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , and . Care of the Older Adult in the Home: Flexible Clinical Experience. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Geriatrics: A Resource Guide for Primary Care (iBook available on iTunes)

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Other Learning Resource Type: 
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
2
Abstract: 

This FREE interactive iBook is intended to cover the most common geriatric topics seen in primary care. The first edition covers: Geriatric Assessment, Polypharmacy, Falls, Dementia, Delirium, and Frailty. The iBook includes presentations, podcasts, videos, links to evidence-based resources and board review questions. The target audience includes physicians, residents, medical students, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants.

Educational objectives: 

Overview of common topics seen in primary care including: Geriatric Assessment, Polypharmacy, Falls, Dementia, Delirium, and Frailty.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Download from iTunes FREE. This iBook can only be viewed using iBooks2 on an iPad. iOS5 is required.

Date posted: 
Tue, 01/29/2013
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Tue, 01/29/2013
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
Geriatrics: A Resource Guide for Primary Care (iBook available on iTunes). POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2013 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

ElderQuest

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
3
Abstract: 

ElderQuest is an interactive 3-D videogame aimed at helping medical students learn the AAMC geriatric competencies. The first 5-mission playpack of a single-player game has been completed, during which the player starts a journey to save the Grey Sage and the Kingdom from various hazards. Game content reinforces medication management, cognitive disorders, falls, self-care capacity and atypical presentation of disease. Key members of the geriatrics team are integrated into the game and storyline in order to illustrate the interprofessional team-based model for geriatric care. Educational metrics measuring geriatrics content and learner performance are mapped to specific AAMC competency areas and programmed to generate in-game feedback to the player as they accomplish each mission. An example screenshot of a player debriefing screen is provided. A survey to evaluate student acceptance of video gaming as a learning tool has been developed and is also provided.

Educational objectives: 
  1. Use first-person interactive game play,  competition  and immediate player feedback to acquire competition geriatrics content knowledge and guide self-improvement.
  2. Apply AAMC geriatric competencies related to medication management, cognitive disorders, falls, self-care capacity and atypical presentation of disease to game challenges
  3. Improve retention of geriatrics content knowledge acquired about AAMC geriatric competencies. Improve retention of geriatrics content knowledge acquired about AAMC geriatric competenImprove retention of and proficiency in AAMC geriatric competencies linked to game play success. 
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Live internet access by a computer with traditional keys and a mouse is required to 1) access the website which hosts the game and 2) execute game commands. You must download and install the free Unity game engine in order to play.

Measurement of specific student performance data other than general in-game debriefing screens for the player, such as item performance and time spent in game,  requires contracting with the game developer, Brainstorm Rising, LLC, for a site-specific database. Game progress may be saved at the end of any mission by the player. The game may be played multiple times in multiple sessions for as long as desired. In-game help is available for geriatrics content knowledge related to the game. 

Publications from, presentations from, and/or citations to this product: 

Pomidor A, Pomidor B, Granville L, Brummel-Smith K, Baker S. ElderQuest: Video Game Fun with the AAMC Competencies. Poster presented at the 2011 American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, May 12, 2011, National Harbor, MD. 

2011 American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting, National Harbor, MD.  Model Geriatric Programs: Geriatric Education Materials and Methods Swap. “ElderQuest: Video Game Fun with the AAMC Competencies” May 12, 2011. 

Harris S. Video Games as Medical Education Tools.  AAMC Reporter. June 2011. https://www.aamc.org/newsroom/reporter/june2011/250894/games.html Acc

Accessed , accessed  

 

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
ElderQuest. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Interdisciplinary Teaching Safe Transitions Case-Based Session

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

This is an initial introduction for medical interns to the goals of safe discharge from the hospital and the role of the interdisciplinary team in facilitating transitions of care. This session includes: Case 1 - Overview of discharge planning; during this session, each team member will introduce her/himself, Case 2 - Discharge to home of elderly patient with multiple needs, and Case 3 - Uninsured patient - new diabetic (if have time to go over). The overall format should be one of a mock-interdisciplinary team meeting with interns reviewing the cases, asking questions, and interdisciplinary team members adding information and expertise. Each case will be discussed for approximately 10 minutes and will have attending internal medicine physician moderating to assist in ensuring the key points are discussed.

 

Educational objectives: 

At the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the importance of a safe discharge from the hospital.
  2. Identify the complexities of creating a safe transition of care out of hospital to home or facility.
  3. Identify high risk discharge issues.
  4. Discuss entry criteria and scope of care provided by the potential sites of care for hospital discharge.
  5. Identify the health professionals involved in facilitating a safe discharge and their respective roles in the process.
  6. Describe the interdisciplinary discharge process and value its role in facilitating a safe discharge.
  7. Describe the importance of communication with patient and family members in care transitions.
Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

Requires interdisciplinary discharge team member involvement - ie: RN, SW, Pharmacist. Can also add PT/OT.

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Interdisciplinary Teaching Safe Transitions Case-Based Session. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Obtaining a Functional History: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS 1

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Abstract: 

"Obtaining a Functional History" is a curriculum for first year medical students consisting of a 1.5 hr didactic session on geriatric history-taking and includes a visit by an older adult community member who fields questions about his/her life story. Following the lecture, pairs of students visit an assigned "trained patient" living in an independent senior building that is part of a retirement community. The students conduct a geriatric functional history and home safety assessment (1.5 hrs.). (Volunteer "trained patients" were recruited for this project and participated in a 2 hr. training session to prepare them for this role. Sample training packet, training video and user's guide are included.) Students' interviewing skills are rated by "trained patients" and oral feedback is given to them as well. Students also complete a knowledge test and attitudes assessment pre and post-course, and write a 250 word reflective essay about their interviewing experience. Materials provided here include:  the lecture with speaker's notes, pre and post-tests, geriatric history-taking form, "trained patient" evaluation, and a sample "trained patient" training materials. An answer key is available upon request from Editor@POGOe.org.

Educational objectives: 

"Obtaining a Functional History"  addresses the AAMC Competencies below and teaches first year medical students how to:

1.  Assess and describe baseline and current functinal abilities (instumental activities of daily living, activities of daily living, and special senses) in an older paitent by collecting historical data from multiple sources and performing a confirmatory physical examination. (AAMC Competency #9)

2. Identify and assess safety risks in the home environment, and make recommendations to mitigate these. (AAMC Competency #11)

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

To provide students the opportunity to interview geriatric trained patients, arrangements were made with a local retirement community granting permission for independent senior to be recruited for this voluntary, medical student education training program. Residents participated in an on-site, 2-hour training session, led by the authors/geriatricians, on how to evaluate students' interviewing skills. A sample training packet is provided.

Piloted in Spring 2011 at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, GATE ("Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments") is a longitudinal, competency-based curriculum for medical students. The M2 curriculum is an introduction to geriatric assessments; the M3 curriculum addresses geriatric care in the hospital; and M4 training examines care in the nursing home setting.  GATE includes a comprehensive and integrated evaluation process measuring knowledge, attitudes and skills. Supplemental materials developed by other Reynolds grantee institutions and available on POGOe are incorporated in the GATE M3 and M4 curricula.

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , and . Obtaining a Functional History: Geriatrics and Aging through Transitional Environments (GATE) Curriculum for MS 1. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Geriatric Emergency Medicine Online Curriculum (GEM-OC) 5 - ED Workflow and Dispo Decision-Making

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is Module Five of an online five-module curriculum. The modules, which are based on national geriatric emergency medicine competencies, cover a broad range of geriatric topics through an interactive teaching format. They require learners to review and analyze patient information, interpersonal interactions, laboratory and imaging results, diagnoses and treatment plans. This module teaches about workflow in the Emergency Department and disposition decision-making.

Educational objectives: 

At the end of this Module, you will be able to:

1) Assess and describe baseline and current functional abilities in an older adult by collecting historical data from multiple sources, making sure to include instrumental activities of daily living and activities of daily living, and performing a confirmatory hearing and vision examination.

2) Develop a preliminary management plan for patients presenting with functional deficits including adaptive interventions and involvement of interdisciplinary team members from appropriate disciplines, such as social work, nursing, rehabilitation, nutrition and pharmacy.

3) Identify and assess safety risks in the home environment, and make recommendations to mitigate these.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

For best viewing results, please:

  • Set your monitor resolution to 1024x768
  • Launch in either Internet Explorer 6 or higher, Firefox 2 or higher or Safari 3.2.1 or higher
  • Avoid using browser navigation. Use only the navigation provided within the course.

 

Date posted: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Fri, 06/08/2012
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Geriatric Emergency Medicine Online Curriculum (GEM-OC) 5 - ED Workflow and Dispo Decision-Making. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2012 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Geriatric Emergency Medicine Online Curriculum (GEM-OC) 4 - Assessing Falls and ADLs

:  
Date Posted: 
12/31/1969
Date Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
12/31/1969
Product Information
Estimated time to complete: 
1
Abstract: 

This is Module Four of an online five-module curriculum. The modules, which are based on national geriatric emergency medicine competencies, cover a broad range of geriatric topics through an interactive teaching format. They require learners to review and analyze patient information, interpersonal interactions, laboratory and imaging results, diagnoses and treatment plans. This module teaches about assessing falls and activities of daily living (ADLs).

Educational objectives: 

At the end of this Module, you will be able to:

1) Identify and assess safety risks in the home environment, and make recommendations to mitigate these.

2) Ask all patients >65 years of age, or their caregivers, about falls in the last year, watch the patient rise from a chair and walk (or transfer), then record or interpret the findings.

3) Communicate the key components of a safe discharge plan (e.g., accurate medication list, plan for follow-up), including comparing/contrasting potential sites for discharge.

4) In a patient who has fallen, construct a differential diagnosis and evaluation plan that addresses the multiple etiologies identified  by history, physical examination and functional assessment.

5) Understand the role of physical and occupational therapy services for elderly patients with falls. Emphasize and encourage interdisciplinary patient care.

Additional information/Special implementation requirements or guidelines: 

For best viewing results, please:

  • Set your monitor resolution to 1024x768
  • Launch in either Internet Explorer 6 or higher, Firefox 2 or higher or Safari 3.2.1 or higher
  • Avoid using browser navigation. Use only the navigation provided within the course.

 

Date posted: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Date Submitted or Reviewed/Updated for Clinical Accuracy: 
Mon, 10/24/2011
Contact Person/Corresponding Author:



Suggested Citation:
, , , , , and . Geriatric Emergency Medicine Online Curriculum (GEM-OC) 4 - Assessing Falls and ADLs. POGOe - Portal of Geriatrics Online Education; 2011 Available from: https://pogoe.org/taxonomy/term/102

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - 11 SCC: Identify safety risks in home